• For posts related to budget, finanace, legalities, distro, and marketing (including festivals) please post in Film Biz.
    Rule of thumb:
    Filmmaking for directors (creative)
    Film Biz for producers (buisness)

crew Why is it so difficult to find collaborators for a project?

Nate North

Business Member
indieBIZ
I have to assume that I'm not the only one on an independent film form that wants to make an independent film. If you've ever tried making one, you know that it's nearly impossible to have any type of success without a larger group involved. My question is, why are people uninterested in joining teams or groups? As a lone individual, your fate is sealed, if 1000 of us worked together, there is no question we'd get something published. I bought a product yesterday. 12 people got together and worked full time on it for 3 years. It was great, I paid full price for it. They now have funding for the next product, and everyone is happy and headed for a profitable carreer in the industry.

Here's the clip I watched about their team and project. It's just a simple top down shooter, innovation level 0. It was great, no issues, everyone is happy.


I live in a small town, and neighborhood garage bands are common. People get together and practice for years, travelling 50 miles to a practice spot, to split up 200 dollars a gig, once they are good enough. They spend thousands each on equipment, and hundreds of hours just getting to that point, and everyone shows up for that.

If people are as passionate about making film as they say they are, why is the willingness to team up and commit so fractional in filmmaking, compared to music, which is arguably hundreds of times easier to succeed at (at least in terms of getting a set written and playing it for an audience)? Do you think it would be strange to watch 6 people collaborate and spend for years to build a lemonade stand, and then go over to a skyscraper construction forum and find everyone trying to do it solo with no money?
 
Believe it or not? I think that's why MOST of US come here to Indietalk... LOL. Many of us have had experiences like mine above and it gets old. Sometimes you just want to talk film and unfortunately... Even with more and more people making films [sic] there doesn't seem to be a whole hell of a lot of people to have those discussions with.

It would NOT surprise me ONE BIT if most of the members here that regularly contribute could work together on a project. To even be willing to have discussions like these shows a lot of us where each others' heads are at. Which I think... Is why we TRY to help as much as we can via the forum.

I think it would be amazing to work with MANY of the members I see here who post. And? I think it would be a great experience. But until we can figure out how to make films without leaving our respective digs or how to make sure everyone gets paid?

I guess we just keep on keeping on.
 
That's why today? If I were going to make a film? I would do my best to make sure everyone gets paid. I don't want to try to pass MY passion onto others to get them to work for nothing. I don't want to promise them that I'll take them all with me if I succeed. It's just not realistic. In fact? I know plenty of films that have been made by small groups of people over the years only to end up having everyone eventually pissed off at each other because in the end?

There was no reciprocity.
I agree with you and Mlesemann. You should pay "something." Otherwise, people start peeling away, and you get the resentment that you refer to.

You don't have to answer, but I'm guessing you're talking about N. California group that J.C. was a part of. And, in New Mexico, you probably ran into John Grace a few times.

I'm in the middle of two features, right now. Post production (and one more shoot day) on EVIL DWELLS WITHIN, and shooting DRONE DOWN, starting this Sunday. For the latter, I'm paying people $70 per day, which is all we have. I'm being given a 10K budget, with 3K going to bigfoot, and the rest going to costumes, props, food, and the cast & crew. I just multiplied the number of people by how many shooting days, and divided the remaining budget. Actually, the divided number was $57, but I'll make up some difference (possibly out of my own pocket) to get everyone to $70. I'm keeping the days under 12 hours, because of the small amount. Everyone seems appreciative of me doing what I can to pay them something.
 

Alcove Audio

Business Member
indieBIZ
I've been keeping out of this one, and have not read every single post in detail.

There are a lot of dreamers out there. They have dreams of a hit record/video, or an acting career, or making the next "Star Wars" that revolutionizes the film industry. But for 99% of then that's all they remain - dreams. They fall apart when reality smacks them in the face.

Then there are those who may have some talent but are completely self centered. Their egos get in the way and they eventually self destruct.

Unknowns tale of two directors getting deals and not taking anyone along with them is just a big example of a recurring problem. When I was starting out in audio post I did a lot of freebees to gain experience. I knew going in that there would be no money and nothing would ever come of the "deferred" pay. But they never even came through with a DVD of the finished project, nor did my name ever appear in their IMDB or film site - or even in the fornicating credits! So forgive me if I don't have any faith in your promises.

"What do I get out of it?" is always the issue. My studio and my equipment cost A LOT of money. My skills and my experience come from fighting it out down here in the trenches doing actual work. You contacted me because you liked the sound of my work. Well, I DESERVE to be paid for my efforts. Oh, it's your passion project? Well, it's not my passion project. I guess that your passion doesn't extend to coughing up just a little cash to get the job done right. Why should I believe your promises when nobody else has lived up to their word?

So "Show me the money!" because "Money talks, and bullshit walks." I'll save my passion for paying clients, my personal projects and the bedroom.

Sorry about my little diatribe, but this is the reality for many of us hired guns.

Peace,

Uncle Bob

205-2054284_grumpy-old-man-puppet-lol-funny-comedian-walter.png
 
I ran into this problem a lot in my film classes. I always did my best to try to compensate for this, but its incredibly tiring to operate a camera, do lighting, and direct. I learned the hard way that even doing this on a 2 minute short was too much for me. This was just doing class projects too.

The few projects I did outside of class where I worked as crew I did my best to make sure I did some clean up on our crude sets during breaks. Huge time saver for when everyone's spent after the shoots almost done and want to go home and sleep.
 
As a lone individual, your fate is sealed, if 1000 of us worked together, there is no question we'd get something published.
Hey Nate, have you taken a look at "Decentraland" by any chance? It sounds like your project has some similarities in it's concept and just wondered if you've considered using a similar business model to get your project going.

Decentraland uses blockchain technology to allow users to share virtual assets and create their own worlds by purchasing virtual real estate and customising it with assets for others to use and interact with. MANA is the virtual currency used within the game and it facilitates payments of all kinds from buying in-game features to paying developers for their work.

I'm just thinking that what you really need is reource, and what your potential resource needs, is an incentive. In the absence of actual money, that incentive could come in the form of a virtual cryptocurrency payment, native to Savepoint, which effectively gives them shares in the project should it become succesful. To me, it's a lot better than an assurance of deferred pay or the promise of future mutual benefit as they would have something tangible in the form of a cryptocurrency in their e-wallet. Ok, the coins would be worthless initially, but so was MANA at one time, now it has a market cap of $1.5bn and all the developers involved in the initial setup would have had a hefty share of those tokens.

I don't know how familiar you are with blockchain tech but you seem pretty computer proficient so I don't think it's beyond your capabilities with a little help. For the purpose of your project, you wouldn't need to 'create' your own cryptocurrency from scratch, there's a lot of existing open-source code for crypto 'tokens' which just utilise existing blockchains like the Ethereum network. Lots of people are out there now just customising these existing codes to create their own tokens and then hope they create enough hype to get people buying them and push the price up before selling the massive shares they gave themselves at the start. Not suggesting that's what you should do, but the fact there are people making big money out of projects with no inherent use-case, there's no reason why you couldn't do it with a legitimate project like Savepoint to help get it off the ground.

Might not be for you or what you envision for your project but thought it worth suggesting. There's a lot of gaming crypto setups like MANA, Enjin and Sandbox who are doing extremely well from it so jumping on the crypto hype train might be an option to get people on board if you can "sell" them your vision for the project.
 
Hey everybody, first time for me to join this conversation.

You should know that I'm one of the people that has joined the Save Point project so far and for the last week I have been working closely with Nate, as we are trying to get this thing moving.

From reading all your replies I believe you all understand that it is an enormously difficult job to get it off the ground with only a hand full of people, as there are so many things to be done: writing, directing, music, animation, 3D art, scene art, character art, foley & sound design, programming and of course the development of the PIPELINE (I know this seems to be a controversial word around here πŸ˜… ).

So you can see that much help is needed, as you already know.



First, as there seems to be some confusion, let me try to explain in my own way what Save Point is:

I would say Save Point is what you would consider a TV show (although it will be running on YouTube most likely).

The twist: It is INFINITE and CHOICE BASED.

That's basically the gist of it.



Diving deeper: As it is infinite and choice based there will naturally be branching storylines.


Annotation 2021-08-14 112232.jpg


...and so on.



Also just to clarify: Save Point has kind of it's own vocabulary for some things, because it makes more sense for this project, let me show you.

Cell = A single YouTube video = The story between choices.

Chapter = What you would call a single TV Episode (consisting of multiple cells) = A conclusive story that is part of a larger story (like with TV episodes)

Game = One full life = The time we spend with a character before he/she dies or resets the Save Point (which allows you to go back in time), Nate has already posted a perfect example from Rick and Morty here.

Cell < Chapter < Game

I hope this way it makes more sense to everyone, if not let me know.



People here said that everyone wants to work on THEIR project, not someone elses.

First of all, people like me (a composer) don't have their own project. I actively search for other peoples projects I can be a part of and where I can learn and expand my experience and portfolio. There should be many people like that I assume (animators, artists, composers, programmers etc.).

Second of all, the unique thing with Save Point is that you will be working on your own project at some point.
Like I explained there will be so many different storylines, that we will need multiple directors, producers, writers and everything else to create THEIR story and THEIR version of the universe.
You will be able to take the story wherever you want.



I also believe most of you, as you are all in the film industry, will be able to understand Nate's frustration. I for one do.
As a composer it is so hard to find a good project to work on (even though that's already my full time job), and I feel like Save Point is something I can finally be excited about!

I share Nate's frustration because I know how it feels to want to work on something, that just not enough people take as seriously as you do.



And that's also a big thing that draws me towards this project: Nate's commitment.

I have been chatting with him for a week, and some more weeks via text before that and I can honestly say that he is 1) kinda crazy but in a good way, and 2) as committed as it gets.
Once you get to know him this will become evident very quickly.

He asked me some days ago if I thought he was fully committed to the project, and it took me a while to respond because I didn't know how to express how insanely committed I think he is.

So if there's one thing I'm certain of, it's that this project won't fail because he abandons it in some way, that will simply NOT happen.



As for payment, if it were possible everyone would be on the payroll. Right now it's not. I'm not getting paid at the moment either.
Money is not the primary reason I take on a project (as is the case with even very accomplished composers, especially in gaming), I want to learn, work on something that gets me excited, and expand my protfolio in the process.

There is a ton to learn here and I think it's an awesome way to do some creative work.

And I am CERTAIN that Save Point will succeed, it's just a matter of time and manpower.



My closing argument:

If you are interested in doing some meaningful creative work, are dedicated and really mean it, this is your chance. Nate got me excited and to a point where I care about the project. As I see it we have a chance to work on something awesome here.

Thanks for bearing with me, this was a long one. :)
 
Last edited:

Nate North

Business Member
indieBIZ
Hey Nate, have you taken a look at "Decentraland" by any chance? It sounds like your project has some similarities in it's concept and just wondered if you've considered using a similar business model to get your project going.

Decentraland uses blockchain technology to allow users to share virtual assets and create their own worlds by purchasing virtual real estate and customising it with assets for others to use and interact with. MANA is the virtual currency used within the game and it facilitates payments of all kinds from buying in-game features to paying developers for their work.

I'm just thinking that what you really need is reource, and what your potential resource needs, is an incentive. In the absence of actual money, that incentive could come in the form of a virtual cryptocurrency payment, native to Savepoint, which effectively gives them shares in the project should it become succesful. To me, it's a lot better than an assurance of deferred pay or the promise of future mutual benefit as they would have something tangible in the form of a cryptocurrency in their e-wallet. Ok, the coins would be worthless initially, but so was MANA at one time, now it has a market cap of $1.5bn and all the developers involved in the initial setup would have had a hefty share of those tokens.

I don't know how familiar you are with blockchain tech but you seem pretty computer proficient so I don't think it's beyond your capabilities with a little help. For the purpose of your project, you wouldn't need to 'create' your own cryptocurrency from scratch, there's a lot of existing open-source code for crypto 'tokens' which just utilise existing blockchains like the Ethereum network. Lots of people are out there now just customising these existing codes to create their own tokens and then hope they create enough hype to get people buying them and push the price up before selling the massive shares they gave themselves at the start. Not suggesting that's what you should do, but the fact there are people making big money out of projects with no inherent use-case, there's no reason why you couldn't do it with a legitimate project like Savepoint to help get it off the ground.

Might not be for you or what you envision for your project but thought it worth suggesting. There's a lot of gaming crypto setups like MANA, Enjin and Sandbox who are doing extremely well from it so jumping on the crypto hype train might be an option to get people on board if you can "sell" them your vision for the project.
We've actually been considering something along these lines. It's an international project, so international currency is a good fit. I definitely appreciate the reply. I'm not particularly well versed in crypto markets and technology, mainly because for me money is a tertiary interest at best, but I can absolutely see your point, and I'd welcome the opportunity to talk with you about it. This actually sounds like a practical and well thought out idea. You can feel free to join us on the discord if you feel like you could spare the time to help me better understand the potential and implementation here. An issue that's caused me problems in terms of raising investment for Save Point is intrinsic to the unique aspects of the project. When you have something that's designed to expand semi exponentially, there's a built in issue where stock I distributed would face systemic inflation. I guess that's happened with a lot of crypto, and no one seems worse off for it. Perhaps I'm not seeing this thing clearly. I've talked to people about investment, but was unable to get past the expansion issue. I'll give an example, and if I'm lucky, you can show me where the flaw in my logic is. Since this is an open platform intended to serve as a home to many creators, each chapter director essentially owning their own business, if I take 100k in investment for 10% I've effectively sold 10% of the income that every filmmaker to come would earn, ongoing forever. It might sound like a lot of money to get for a fledgling company with no track record, and it is, however, it would essentially double the tax rate on all of them for life. I couldn't accept 100 grand in return for that, because those businesses won't belong to me exactly. I could mortgage my own future, but don't feel comfortable mortgaging theirs. TBH I haven't spent as much time considering the mechanics of all of that end as I should have. It's been quite an undertaking just figuring out the production end, and how to present such a large scale idea to the public. One concept I did have was to use SP's natively huge art output to continuously generate NFT tokens. Gas fees being what they are, I haven't been able to invest in getting that started. There's also a constant issue so far where it's a chicken and egg, cart and horse type problem. We don't have enough funding to even begin the process of getting funding.
 

Nate North

Business Member
indieBIZ
Sounds a bit like Black Mirror, Bandersnatch
Save point will be exactly like Bandersnatch, just hundreds of times larger and more interesting, lol

The branching plotlines thing is actually quite old, having it's heyday in the 1980s with CYOA books, but in every case including Bandersnatch, there were hard limitations on the growth of the branches

Something I've been trying to communicate here and there is that cost per segment has been the main limitation of this artform, always. When I talk about this pipeline, and about how speed and efficiency is so key, that's what it's all about.

Something we all know about here is the prohibitive cost of live film. If you don't have millions of dollars, it's a serious problem to create even an hour of television at a level where networks will be interested. With animation, it's less expensive, but it would still be a roadblock to creating something as large in scope as we are envisioning here.

To "Pivot" again, a big part of Save Point is the creation of this vast modular asset library (already underway) that allows nearly drag and drop creation of scenes at a certain level. I'll briefly describe a simple use case. Let's say it takes 10 hours of labor to create 3 jungle scenes, and another 20 to render them. Each scene is large enough to move a camera around in, producing many different shots. Add colorist layers, etc, and you can get a lot of different scenes. Now that work gets baked down to simple alpha channel PNG files, and organized by camera angle, asset type, location, etc. It can be accessed by a searchable database.

Maybe a few more teams come along and build jungle scenes, and after a few hundred hours of work (that's worldwide) we have 20 jungle scenes with 100's of variations possible.

From that time on, every person that needs to create a jungle scene can simply use an existing location, or even mix and match. At that point the work required to finish that scene with 3 jungle locations goes down from 30 hours to a few minutes.

Sound like a lot of files? It will be, but they would grow organically over time. In example, I personally have logged about 4,800 files already, working alone over the course of 6 months. This project is designed so that eventually thousands of people could collaborate on it over decades.

By compressing time in this way, we can snowball development speed as the pyramid expands, and reach a point where constructing an animated "cell" could take place in a single day, an hour or two in simpler cases such as a conversation in a single location. All resources developed under the SP system are communal, and can be used freely within the system. Chapters can be owned by individual teams, but the assets cannot. The value you build within the system is based around storytelling, expansion, creativity, and just being the first to market with a new idea.

Comp 1 (0;00;00;00)_45.jpg

Comp 1 (0;00;00;00)_34.jpg

Comp 1 (0;00;00;00)_30.jpg
 
Last edited:

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
He asked me some days ago if I thought he was fully committed to the project, and it took me a while to respond because I didn't know how to express how insanely committed I think he is.

So if there's one thing I'm certain of, it's that this project won't fail because he abandons it in some way, that will simply NOT happen.
There's no doubt he's committed! His strong suit isn't marketing, and we get that. The team seems to know exactly what they are working on. He should utilize you guys more for marketing. Dancing around terms does not exactly help the message.

of the PIPELINE (I know this seems to be a controversial word around here πŸ˜… ).
It's not controversial. He was telling us he used the word at least five times so we should understand his project, before he even told us it was a game. NOW we get it. All of it.
 
So if there's one thing I'm certain of, it's that this project won't fail because he abandons it in some way, that will simply NOT happen.

While I do predict it will die because everyone else abandons it.... I sure hope I'm wrong. I wish him the best of luck but I've seen projects with enough similarities to believe it will die. It's the death that comes to most ideas that aren't catchy enough or run by leaders who can't lead their way out of a wet paper bag to ever get to a tipping point. Metaphorically speaking, these kinds of projects need an army, not the occasional weekend warrior.

My closing argument

Look, this isn't aimed directly at you, but referencing limited social proof with a push to garner additional followers is very pyramid scheme like.

If you are indeed a legitimate person, I wish you the best of luck with it. I have a few friends who are composers so I know how tough it can be. Too many composers get scammed into giving away their work for free without any consideration. I genuinely hope you get benefit as much from your contribution of the project as you put in.

At least a silver lining; It hasn't changed from being a computer game is this week. I suppose, celebrate the small victories.
 
Look, this isn't aimed directly at you, but referencing limited social proof with a push to garner additional followers is very pyramid scheme like.

If you are indeed a legitimate person, I wish you the best of luck with it. I have a few friends who are composers so I know how tough it can be. Too many composers get scammed into giving away their work for free without any consideration. I genuinely hope you get benefit as much from your contribution of the project as you put in
I honestly don't get why in the world you would call Save Point or even me for that matter a scam or some pyramid scheme...

I hope you understand that you are talking to real people with real feelings on these forums, not that I would be hurt by such comments, but some people might, and I hope you will choose your words more carefully then.

It has nothing to do with being scammed into giving my work away for free, I can assure you.
Nate has offered me the bit of money he has left, and knowing what position that would put him in, I refused.

Some people simply want to work on something meaningful from time to time, including me.

While I do predict it will die because everyone else abandons it....
Well that's why we hope to get more people on board. Although I'm sure he would continue even if it were just him.
And fortunately the idea is good too.
 
I don't think Nate is a scammer and I certainly don't think the people who buy into his vision are scammers. I think Nate is massively – perhaps pathologically – ambitious. And ambition is very seductive and powerful in this industry, amongst indie filmmakers who hold such big dreams but such limited possibilities in terms of realising them. Save Point sounds like it could be a really interesting existentialist game-come-movie CYOA working across YouTube – obviously, Nate's ambitions are more ambitious than that and he wants to change storytelling forever.

Personally, I think ambition is Nate's enemy. I think 'wanting to change storytelling' rather than 'wanting to tell a story' is dangerous simply for the reason that it's almost impossible. I would rather have more limited ambitions that I can fulfil in my lifetime, but that's just me.

I guess I have one last observation: 10 years or so ago, Nate came to this forum and he was hugely ambitious. He had this great project – Deathworld – that he wanted to convince people to give up their lives (as they knew them) for and join him on the journey. And he definitely got a few people on board. There were a few people like Laios who really bought into his vision, became evangelists themselves. But there were also a few old-timers from this board (people who I felt like I knew pretty well) who dreamed his dream. And we had this exact conversation; almost the same thread separated by a decade.

Anyway, when I hear people saying that Nate won't give up, I guess I think back to Deathworld. Because there is no Deathworld film. I don't know if Nate gave up or whether things went wrong outside his control or whether there's a copy of Deathworld locked in a vault somewhere! But I do know that a lot of people (Nate very much included, to the highest degree) poured their heart and soul into that project and at the end? No movie, no money, no career enhancement. So I guess that would be the note of caution I would sound and I only sound it because Nate's dreams are so damn big! If he just wanted to cobble together a microbudget feature film like the rest of us, I wouldn't care enough to join in with this thread.

On that note, who's going to option the movie rights to this thread? I'll start the bidding at $1.
 
Last edited:

Nate North

Business Member
indieBIZ
ok, I have a lot on my plate, but that needs and deserves a reply. Honestly all of these posts deserve a reply, and I've been falling behind as I try to accomplish so much with so little, perhaps a recurring theme.

Personally, I think ambition is Nate's enemy. I think 'wanting to change storytelling' rather than 'wanting to tell a story' is dangerous simply for the reason that it's almost impossible. I would rather have more limited ambitions that I can fulfil in my lifetime, but that's just me.

I think there has been at least half of a misunderstanding here. I do see where you'd get that from my discussions, and I haven't spoken much on this topic to date. Save Point's storytelling may surprise you in the following ways -

1, At the outset, a lot of it is going to be boilerplate classic adventure, drama, scifi, fantasy stuff. I'm not looking to reinvent every wheel on the car at once. It's not going to be copy paste or anything like that, but essentially the plan is to stick to tried and true storytelling approaches in the early years, and branch out into the fantastical and innovative once we feel like we're on solid ground. There is an attempt at grounded practicality here, and from your statements, I feel like I haven't spent enough time getting that aspect across.

2. We're going to keep it pretty simple early on, and the user end technology extremely simple. You should have thought provoking choices to make, and they should lead to logical if often surprising outcomes. I do envision some grandiose possibilities, but I also see the need for stability to come first. Early adventures are likely to be quite recognizable, exploring mysterious islands, winning a sports competition, a closed room mystery in the style of "and then there were none", etc. If I ever said I planned to change storytelling forever, I misspoke. I agree with you that it's a goal too ambitious to achieve. I can create a newish format here that allows old stories to be told in new ways, but at the end of the day, the driver wins the race, the guy gets the girl, and the detective finds the murderer. Not 100% sure what caused the perception that I was going to go overboard shaking things up. You'll likely get some antihero and multiverse tales out of me eventually, but I'll walk before I try to fly.

3. I kind of feel like both of those were the same points, lol

I guess I have one last observation: 10 years or so ago, Nate came to this forum and he was hugely ambitious. He had this great project – Deathworld – that he wanted to convince people to give up their lives (as they knew them) for and join him on the journey. And he definitely got a few people on board. There were a few people like Laios who really bought into his vision, became evangelists themselves. But there were also a few old-timers from this board (people who I felt like I knew pretty well) who dreamed his dream. And we had this exact conversation; almost the same thread separated by a decade.

I understand this comment, but I can shoot some holes in it with little effort.

1. You learn from your mistakes. If we don't get back up after a defeat and try something different, what value was that education?

2. These projects couldn't be more different. let's say you tried to start a zoo on a barge in Zimbabwe one year, and it failed. That's in no way evidence that starting a cheeseburger restaurant that delivered to a college would also fail. I think real failure comes when people overgeneralize their experience, and lack the courage to get back on their feet and modify their approach.

3. Deathworld wasn't a total loss, and you're wrong that no one advanced from it. I personally learned a great deal. It also broke me financially. that wasn't great. I can't write that novella here and now, but what basically happened was that I had 2 seperate business agreements that were supposed to provide funding for the project, and we were unfortunate enough to have both fall through almost simultaneously. The causes were external, and not related to any of us at the mansion. One company I was dealing with was bought out by another company and my contract with them disintegrated during the administration restructuring. The other contract was lost because the guy providing it was victimized by an actual con man, who essentially walked off with a very sizable chunk of cash, and left our would be employer without the funding to complete his agreements with us. You could call it a perfect storm.

4. When I say Save Point is different, I mean almost every single supporting beam in the structure has been completely reimagined. I had 3 years filmmaking experience then, I have 13 now. For example, this project is modular, with simple and achievable pieces of progress being completed almost daily. Deathworld was an all or nothing endeavor where we got shot down on the runway while trying to get wheels up. That alone is a very very significant difference. Save Point can begin to see traction at a tiny fraction of the cost that deathworld did. That's significant. Save Point is a much better designed and well thought out project in so many ways I literally would be here all night if I tried to list them. Long story short, I understand your comment but strongly disagree with it's validity. People apply this logic to nuclear reactors. And to this day we still have all these coal plants because of their fear and mistrust. I get what it's based on, but the reality is that those fears are misplaced. Chernobyl and 3 mile island were cobbled together from blueprints made from pencil and paper, we now have cad programs with built in stress testing, material analysis, simulated dynamics, etc. Materials science and construction technology have advanced considerably, and barring acts of god such as the Japanese tsunami, we have not seen a single reactor explosion in decades. Still, millions fear nuclear power, and boycott it's implementation, based on fears they cultivated in another time, when things were different.

Lastly, there never was a Deathworld movie made. What you may not know was that I wasn't the only one who failed to make it. The liscense has been bought repeatedly, and many directors with more funding than myself have had issues with the property. Save Point really is quite different. It's an original idea, and it integrates a lot of technologies that were not available even just a few years ago, technologies that have created astounding cost reductions in areas that would have previously blockaded such an effort. I may be wrong, but I feel that with enough support, we could do something amazing here. I think after trying on dozens of ideas for size, I've found something that really can work, and I'm doing everything I can to make it work. The deciding factor will be how many stand on the sidelines and debate, and how many work to build. I can't control that directly, I only know that there are others out there, somewhere, that are like me.
 
Deathworld – that he wanted to convince people to give up their lives (as they knew them) for and join him on the journey.

I think after trying on dozens of ideas for size, I've found something that really can work, and I'm doing everything I can to make it work. The deciding factor will be how many stand on the sidelines and debate, and how many work to build.
Isn't there a name for doing the same thing over and over again, expecting a different outcome?
 
Top