off-topic CovidTalk

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
Army National Guard is here doing drive through testing.

Army Corp of Engineers is here to transform 10,000 hotel rooms and dorms into hospitals.
 

sfoster

Staff Member
Moderator
I’ve been on a diet of salad for a full month now. Tried to have a cheat night and theres nothing I liked at the store. They didn’t have the chocolate, candy, popcorn, nothing that I wanted. It was the worst cheat night in the history of dieting.i had some stupid m&m its not even good quality chocolate. No nuts in them either that kind was all sold out too
 
Last edited:

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
Us too. We almost never to take-out in "normal" times - either we cook or go out. We've found that we really miss seeing all of the locals who both work at & patronize out local bars, restaurants, gyms, etc.
I'm with ya. I've never liked take-out - sometimes I'll grab Arby's on my why home - because I love sitting in the restaurant chatting with the servers and the regulars. Did take-out brekfast this morning. By the time I got home it wasn't that good. Breakfast burrito next time.

I'm gonna go broke and get fat...
 
Nope, not fake news or taken out of context, at least as far as I know. I have quite a few friends and a few relatives that are former military. The military has very strict and explicit protocols. When setting up any field operation a security team is sent in first, whether it is really needed or not (as in this case). Their job is to recon (reconnoiter) the area, put security in place and set up comms (communications). Once that is set up, they send in a logistical team who say "we need" and then all that gear is loaded into planes, trucks and ships. (They already know what's needed, but protocols are inviolable in the military.) Since a health emergency has been declared in NYC Trump has activated the emergency medical units of the Army, Navy and National Guard. They are going to "convert" hotels, schools and other buildings into medical facilities. One friend of mine said that schools would actually be preferable, as they don't have carpeting and the like, having hard walls and floors that are much easier to clean. I would not be surprised to see Navy medical ships pulling along side NYC docking terminals in the near future. My understanding is that these converted facilities will handle the usual medical emergencies - broken bones, birthing babies, etc., freeing up the hospitals and their personel to exclusively handle COVID-19 cases - and some will be used as facilities for those who are out of danger, no longer needing critical care but still recovering from Corona Virus.

This is also going to happen - or is already happening - in LA and Seattle, and then branch out from there.

I could have this all wrong, but this is what has been explained to me.
 
The thing is China is not likely to shut down or regulate its wet markets —the origin of this catastrophe; people have to eat. Nor is the PRC likely to fail to cover up new outbreaks or to disseminate false information about them. Therefore, this is likely to happen again and again indefinitely, barring some significant change.

Look at the significant disruption this one pandemic is causing. And, it will not stop at this one, again, barring some significant reorientation.

So I suspect this helps to seal the doom for theatrical distribution. I think it's easy to predict this (and future pandemics?) will propel us toward a streaming and VR future for entertainment. education, and who-knows-what-else.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
I'm happy to see the markets back to almost normal. Went to the local Trader Joe's
yesterday (25th), waited in a line outside for about 5 minutes, got what I needed and
was out in (all in) 18 minutes. The shelves and refrigerated sections were full and
plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables. Still a little shy of canned goods and no paper
products.

I guess the hoarders have what they think they need for now.
 

sfoster

Staff Member
Moderator
I'm happy to see the markets back to almost normal. Went to the local Trader Joe's
yesterday (25th), waited in a line outside for about 5 minutes, got what I needed and
was out in (all in) 18 minutes. The shelves and refrigerated sections were full and
plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables. Still a little shy of canned goods and no paper
products.

I guess the hoarders have what they think they need for now.
Pretty scary when you hear about what happened in india.
Four hour notice and nobody can leave their house for 21 days... I dont have that much food here.
 
I was outside yesterday - in my own backyard - and it was amazing how the sounds of my neighborhood have changed. Our house is in a valley near a river, and it serves as a "sound funnel" so I can almost always hear the highway traffic going over a bridge less than a mile away. I95 is substantially quieter than usual. Since the kids are all home from school I can hear them playing in their backyards (they usually go to the park) and music coming from nearby houses. The birds, squirrels, etc. are more noticeable.

As a sound guy I guess that I just notice things like that more than most.

It was sort of a reminder of the 2003 blackout, in a different way, of course. Then there was a complete lack of the sounds of modern technology such as air conditioners and the like. Most people had made it home by 7pm so the highway was almost silent. It was also quite aromatic that day, as many people congregated in their back yards and decided to barbecue. The yards were lit up with candles, flashlights and camping lanterns ,and there were the sounds of conversation and children playing.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
Here's a sound I can't even explain. I can hear the elevated train from my yard (subway). You can tell it's empty! That is partly perception, sure, but there's also an eerie quality to the rumble.
 
Top