pre-pro Making a Low Budget Sci-Fi Film

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
Cracking away at the set!

Major shout out to the set hands Joel and Stefo for helping bring this creation to life! Every day with their hard work, sweat, and sometimes tears (only because of my driving skills). Without them, this wouldn't be happening right now.

Rob and Ray's workshop has also officially finished building the suit, and it is being shipped from Kodiak as we speak. (holy cow, those shipping prices need cut). Major props to those two for working on such an amazing piece of art over the last couple of months. I can't wait to see it in action!!!

We even have made great strides toward our miniature spaceship, The Lucretia, named after Lucretia Davidson whose poem "To a Star" is featured in this film. Thanks to Alex for hustling and being very generous with the greeblies.

Beautiful work by amazing people. This is why film-making is a one of a kind thing.
 

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onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
I'm a huge sci-fi fan myself and this is looking really amazing. The props and everything look super well done already.
Thanks so much Adam! I am a huge fan of films like Alien, Bladerunner, The Thing, Interstellar, 2001... The list is long. It's hard work to build all of this, but I am confident we can create something cool and unique with all of it.
 

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
Hello everyone! I'm back with just two photos this time, but they explain our progress.

Yesterday, I met with the pro Cinematographer Andrew Dryer to go over blocking and lighting of the set. We have all the major set pieces in place but we still have to decorate the living areas, and with only 2 days until the first shooting day, things are getting a little tense.

But morale is good, everyone is excited, and the set seems like it will definitely pull of the grungy sci-fi aesthetic we are going for.

Bunker Set.jpg

Using old electronics such as Sennheiser power amps, volt meters, radio consoles, and an old CRTV camera system, we are able to build something akin to a ham operator/MacGyver's best fantasy or worst nightmare. The master furnace was made using PVC, foamular board cut with a CNC machine, and various cables/conduit/wires thrown together with hot glue.

The ship is progressing very well too!

The "Lucretia" is being painted and detailed as I post. We can't wait to start playing with it and finding all the ways we can go about giving it life on the screen.

The Lucretia.jpg

Every single person on the team is working hard, and making the most out of the materials we can afford, all in hopes of creating a unique science fiction that stands out from the rest. I can't wait to share more behind the scenes stuff with you all, and I hope you are enjoying a glimpse into our production.

Until next time,
-Cam.
 
Using old electronics such as Sennheiser power amps, volt meters, radio consoles, and an old CRTV camera system, we are able to build something akin to a ham operator/MacGyver's best fantasy or worst nightmare.

:bow: Shame you're so far away - I have rooms full of that kind of stuff that I've been hanging onto in case it might come in useful one day!

But thanks for giving a good reason to keep it a while longer ... :lol:
 

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
This is a very interesting and informative thread, I'm envious.
How much will the final cost be to make this film?
I'm estimating the final cost to be around the $15000 range. It may end up less than that if the practical effects for the space scenes pan out well. If not, then we may have to doctor up things with more expensive gear.
 

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
:bow: Shame you're so far away - I have rooms full of that kind of stuff that I've been hanging onto in case it might come in useful one day!

But thanks for giving a good reason to keep it a while longer ... :lol:
Daaaaaang! I would have loved to find someone on this forum that was close by.
Did you make it yourself, or is it collected over other projects you've worked on?
 
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Did you make it yourself, or is it collected over other projects you've worked on?
The mess? Yeah, I made that myself! :lol:
I'm an incurable hoarder (blame my father and his two brothers - there's a powerful gene on that side of the family) and was eco-responsible before it was a thing, so I have mountains of partially disassembled "stuff" that's been cannibalised for spare parts, and can be re-arranged into any kind of "mad scientist's" workshop with very little notice. Added to that are a variety of "things" that I made for and/or with the children. The children are gone but the chariots, sleds, carts, hobbit-holes, monster boots, WTF?s and the like are still here!

When we bought and renovated this house, I created a space upstairs (where most people would put a landing) that we called "the Room of Requirement" where the children (and father ... :blush: ) could let their imaginations go wild. Unfortunately, their imaginations needed far more space than the 12m² I'd provided, so it became more of a staging post & dumping ground on their way from their bedrooms to the Great Outdoors, and then they grew up and left! :cry: I have literally just finished clearing it out, as part of an ongoing exercise in self-discipline. In preparation for a future stage/screen project, I'm gradually sorting, categorising and more accessibly storing all these potential props.

That doesn't really answer your question though, does it? :crazy:
 
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onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
I have literally just finished clearing it out, as part of an ongoing exercise in self-discipline. In preparation for a future stage/screen project, I'm gradually sorting, categorising and more accessibly storing all these potential props.
Haha, I don't think I would ever get the discipline to clean that stuff. That's when you make a pop-up prop shop.
 

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
First day of filming complete, and it was a surreal experience. I've never worked with pro's before, but now I'm sooooo extremely grateful to have that chance with this project. It was a little intimidating in the beginning donning my Director's cap and being a boss to experienced film vets... But they told me I did a good job, and as long as they're happy I am happy.

Everything and everyone worked above and beyond my expectations. The set was phenomenal, the camerawork exquisite, the crew on point, and the acting beautiful.

I look forward to the other two shooting days we have planned for the project.

I've attached some crew pics along with some film stills from our first day of shooting (ungraded) to share with you fine people.

Until the next update...

-Cam.
 

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