software Adobe Premier or Final Cut Pro ??

Hello there

I am new to all this video stuff, I have a few Canon cameras a XA10, T6 and a T5i and looking for would be the best editing software ??

Adobe Premiere or Final Cut X ??

My PC is a Intel i7 6700K 4.0Ghz, 64gig of ram, Samsung 970 SSD and NVIDIA Quadro K2200 Video Card

I have a Mac Mini mid 2011 Intel i5 2.3Ghz, 16Gig of ram, Seagate SSD and Intel 3000 512 Video

I Also have a iMac 21.5" Mid 2011, Intel i5 2.5Ghz, 16Gig of ram, Seagate SSD and AMD Radeon HD 6750M 512 Video

Some say that Final Cut X is more efficient then any other, so i might be good with less computer power ???

What are you opinions ???

Thanks
 
For what it's worth, I'm looking into the latest version of Vegas Pro.
In the past, Sony Vegas editing software was underrated. Years back, I had a company the put together commercials from pre-existing materials and we used Vegas 6. We had all of them, including Avid, but but my editor preferred Vegas over Final Cut, and only used Avid for special occasions.
 
I never herd of that one before, i will have to looking into that
so far everything I read they say adobe premiere or final cut pro and some say resolve
 
I'm no editor, but my thinking relative to the Industry in general is that if you do the same thing everyone else does, you'll more-or-less get the same results, and that's no way to stand out. So be it software or equipment or whatever, I always search for "the road less traveled by" before I join the parade.
Sometimes I get lucky.
 

jax_rox

Staff Member
Moderator
FCPX is both cheaper in the long-run, and is specifically designed to run extremely well on Mac (and does), though your Macs are kinda old. But either will be great. I tend to find FCPX is better/more intuitive for quick cuts, whilst Premiere Pro is more designed around 'traditional' editing.

If you want to be an editor, learn both (and also Avid).
 
I’m still editing in fcp 7 lmao

I held out on FCS3 (FCP7) for as long as I possibly could. The first release of FCPX was an abomination to anyone working professionally, but eventually it came around. And my work got to the point where I needed some of the newer features (especially 4K handling).

@Biggermens, I think your Macs are a bit aged and underpowered to try and get the most out of FCPX. You need to be up-to-date on your OS, and if the hardware isn’t supported anymore you may have a tough time. I don’t know offhand what your Macs can do, but you can easily find out if they’ll run Catalina at all and if you can at least deal with basic 1080 editing.

I'm no editor, but my thinking relative to the Industry in general is that if you do the same thing everyone else does, you'll more-or-less get the same results, and that's no way to stand out. So be it software or equipment or whatever, I always search for "the road less traveled by" before I join the parade.
Sometimes I get lucky.

As @sonnyboo said, it’s the artist and not the brush. 5 editors using FCP X can get 5 entirely different results. If they all get the same results, then they’re all probably learning everything they know from Film Riot. And choosing to use something just because it goes against the grain seems a bit silly. If you’re in your own production bubble and you never interact with anyone else in the industry, do whatever. But if you have any hope of collaborating widely, you’ll need tools that other folks can use. An experienced filmmaker relies on style and can get pretty much the same result no matter the toolset.

I’ll take functional and interchangeable over “sometimes I get lucky” any day.

Adobe Premiere and FCP X can both offer you the tools to work on your own stuff and with others.

A cliche that is true, but doesn't answer the question. The "tool"
is important.

Yes, the tools do matter. Some of the cheap and free NLE platforms I’d never recommend to anyone, not even a hobbyist. As above, I think they matter more when it comes to established reliability and cross-compatibility.
 
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directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
The editor on my current gig is using FCP 10.4. I sat with him a couple of
times and I can see the improvement over the first version. I'll likely get it soon.
 
The editor on my current gig is using FCP 10.4. I sat with him a couple of
times and I can see the improvement over the first version. I'll likely get it soon.

It’s a very different world from FCP7 and the magnetic timeline takes a LOT of getting used to.

One of the biggest issues for me was the elimination of OMF/AAF export. How do you work with ProTools sound design without that?! Well, Apple never really came around on that, but a third-party developer created X2Pro to create AAFs from FCP’s XML files and it works well.

The one thing that FCP X vastly improves upon, that was the major weakness of FCP7 and prior, is media management.

I’m still learning the platform every day, but getting better.
 
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It's primarily subjective.

Which car is better, a Ford Mustang or a Dodge Challenger?

Neither, if what you need is a production van. Sure, you can argue between a Transit and a Sprinter in that case, but the Mustang and the Challenger are both right out.

Can you make a film with the Sigma ART zoom lenses? Sure! But the minute you need to be able to rack focus, you’ll realize you need a parfocal lens instead... or avoid that move, or just live with extreme focus breathing.

It's preferential and different people can feel entirely different about which software is "better" too.

Of course. But there are still limitations, and there is still such a thing as the right tool for the job. Even if there are several “right tools” to choose from, there are still “wrong tools”.
 
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sonnyboo

Pro Member
indiePRO
IOTM Winner
Again, the point is subjective. What is "best" for you may not be for the original poster. Only he/she can know what is the right tool for what they need.

We can argue the semantics, but basically, there really is no such thing as "which is better" as much as it is "which is better FOR YOU" and no amount of discourse on the internet is going to answer that for every person.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
His question was about efficiency and which his computer could handle best. Not sure anyone answered that, and just got caught up in the coke pepsi wars.
 

sonnyboo

Pro Member
indiePRO
IOTM Winner
Most (if not all) software is scalable in terms of efficiency with editing by proxy or lowering the edit resolution, so it still comes back to preference.

DaVinci Resolve is also a very viable option. Been using it a bit more recently and I like it. Not as much as Premiere Pro, but I do like it.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
What are you opinions ???
I think that's a fair question. One that deserves a fair response.

The "best" software DOES depend on many factors and Biggermens
gave some usable information for an experienced editor to offer an
opinion. Even a novice editor can offer up an opinion based on what
Biggermens posted.

While Biggermens didn't specifically use the words, "best for me" I
think that's exactly what this post is asking.

Biggermens; my opinion is to download the 90 day FCP trial and
use it for a couple of months. It's a strong tool.
 
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