Would anyone be interested in helping a young girl fulfill her dreams?

My name is Anna Turner, this morning my father decided he was going to help me start making films to the best of his ability. MY father has no experience in making films :) so I leave it up to the world of artists to help me. I need to know where to get filming equipment, how much that equipment costs, what it does, how many I need etc... the basics from the start really :) much thanks to all who read and my heart to all who help.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
indiePRO
I'm past the point of having to make multiple small films with a cell phone!
I'm sorry you found my honest, helpful, sincere advice offensive. It's how I
started when I was 13 so I thought others may find that method an option.
I made more than 20 short films with my friends to learn about storytelling
with a camera, working with others, scheduling actors and crew, setting up
shots, lighting, sound and editing.
 
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Whups!
One more!

20120422FilmmakerNaturalLight.png
 
If you're going to give Lightworks a try then I recommend looking at some tutorial videos cause you most likely be clueless about what to do especially since you don't have a lot of editing experience. I know that editshare has some basic tutorials and are making a master class but I've included some other ones that helped me out when first starting as well. Good Luck with the system if you decide to try it out.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRYNAvZJawQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SK4ogYgnm4I&list=PLD1165A595C6C48AA&index=2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGNTDJFS0Hg
 
Also if you're going to be trying to write scripts i would recommend also reading some scripts. You can find scripts online at dailyscript.com or you can just search for a specific script something is bound to come up on the internet. You might also want to read some books on film making. My favorite that I've come across is Robert Rodriguez's Rebel without a crew but if you look around you can find more just go to your local library they are bound to have some.

Since you are starting out you might want to watch Film Riot or the Frugal Filmmaker on Youtube. Frugal Filmmaker is a great source for DIY stuff like Steadicam builds and camera cranes. You can learn from both him and Film Riot. You could also watch behind the scenes footage from different movies, sometimes on DVD's they have like a behind the scenes or the making of so you can watch that to get an idea of what it's like.
 
Also if you're going to be trying to write scripts i would recommend also reading some scripts. You can find scripts online at dailyscript.com or you can just search for a specific script something is bound to come up on the internet. You might also want to read some books on film making. My favorite that I've come across is Robert Rodriguez's Rebel without a crew but if you look around you can find more just go to your local library they are bound to have some.

Since you are starting out you might want to watch Film Riot or the Frugal Filmmaker on Youtube. Frugal Filmmaker is a great source for DIY stuff like Steadicam builds and camera cranes. You can learn from both him and Film Riot. You could also watch behind the scenes footage from different movies, sometimes on DVD's they have like a behind the scenes or the making of so you can watch that to get an idea of what it's like.

Okay thanks. I'll try that. I do have some experience with editors and computers and scripts.
 
A couple of things...

First, you need to develop the hide of a rhinoceros; this business is TOUGH!!! There are going to be lots of people who will rip you to shreds just for fun, some because they feel threatened by your ambition and your talent, and others - like many on this forum, myself included - who will politely rip your work apart because we truly want to you to improve. The most difficult intellectual/emotional challenge is telling which is which.

Filmmaking is all about communication - communicating with your audience, communicating with your actors, communicating with your crew and communicating with backers (backers can be financial, or just people willing to loan you gear or shoot on their property). You need to communicate clearly and concisely.

Filmmaking is all about planning - preproduction. Aside from writing (and rewriting and rewriting and rewriting) your script you should spend at least as much time (if not more) planning your shoot as you spend on the shoot itself. This comes back to communication; you have to KNOW how to answer the questions posed by your cast, crew and backers without hesitation. A complete and thorough preproduction mitigates the problems you have on your shoot and during post production.

You can write any type of script that you desire, but you have to shoot scripts that stay within your financial limits. By financial limits I mean your equipment, locations, cast, crew, etc.

You first projects are going to be HORRIBLE!!! Then you'll progress to really bad, than bad, then not too bad, then okay... You get the idea.

There is nothing like hands-on experience. This is not limited to making your own films. Work as a PA, extra or whatever other job you can get on projects other than your own. You will work on good projects and bad projects. "Most people learn from their mistakes; a professional learns from the mistakes of others." Also, besides gathering practical experience you need to build a network of people who will work on your projects. You can find projects on which to work through Craigs List, Mandy and networking at Meet-Up groups, and there is probably a college or university with a film program near you.

Watch lots of indie films; go to screenings and festivals, and watch them on Vimeo and YouTube.

Always strive for solid sound. You have an edge with a brother involved with audio. However, you and he should be warned that sound-for-picture is very different than music production; I know, I was a music recording engineer before migrating to audio post.

Probably the hardest thing to learn is to detach yourself from your own work and try to experience it as the audience will.

This is a good group here; take advantage of it.

Welcome12-16.gif
 
For the camera that I'm willing to send you, there are a few rules that you will have to follow.

1. USE the camera
2. Learn as much as you can
3. COMPLETE at least 6 movies (preferably 10+ minutes) during 2013
4. Post what you shoot here so that you can get constructive criticism
5. Get better
6. When you have outgrown the camera, pass it on to another aspiring film maker with the same rules.

If you can agree to those rules, I will pay for the shipping as a Christmas present.
 
your 14, your young, theres a 70% chance that youl try this out for a while then give up and go onto something else.

if you manage to achieve the 30% and stick with it then your in for a fun time.

now another rule: learn, learn, practice and learn

so everyone at first wants to do it all, a bit like im doing at the moment, iv written my own short, bought all the equipment, including the sound equipment and my crew consists of me and one other person.

its tough, can you get the actors? can you get the budget? can you be bothered?

this isnt a hobby where you can perfect something.. there is no perfection there is only a level of satisfaction.

youl have 20 haters for every fan.

people will criticise you to the max and will make assumptions on you on a first introduction basis, so far youv come across as sensitive despite being given very useful information by a well respected forum member... tough move.

however dont be disheartened just move on and concentrate on film.

so whats the first step?

learn how to do a basic workflow with the camera and computer your using, however before investing in anything again ask yourself is this really something you want to do ? have you ever shot something before and thought i really could get into this?

once you get the basic stuff going, you can then move onto heavier stuff, your only 14 so you have years to hone in on your skills.

and remember being offended is what this business is about, il easily rip apart 98% of peoples videos on this forum because im a harsh critic, does it mean im perfect myself... no but thats life and thats what people should learn.
 
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For the camera that I'm willing to send you, there are a few rules that you will have to follow.

1. USE the camera
2. Learn as much as you can
3. COMPLETE at least 6 movies (preferably 10+ minutes) during 2013
4. Post what you shoot here so that you can get constructive criticism
5. Get better
6. When you have outgrown the camera, pass it on to another aspiring film maker with the same rules.

If you can agree to those rules, I will pay for the shipping as a Christmas present.

Yes sir, I'll try my hardest. I'll try my best at each one I make and trust me I'll use it! Thank you so much! You are an inspiration!
 
I am young. I am sure this is what I want to do, yeah I'm going to misunderstand some things. I am relying on you all for advice and help. I need everyone to work with me, maybe no body helped you when you were young but that's all the more reason to help someone else. I've got great ideas and big dreams, and all of you are involved. I do understand it's going to tough, it's all in the attitude I may be famous one of these days but I won't ever make it until I learn! That's why I'm here to learn so let's start class :P
 
As some of the more recent posters alluded to, the film business is BRUTAL . . . developing tough skin is absolutely necessary to survive in this business.

Good luck.
 
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I may be famous one of these days...

Fame and fortune are a byproduct of being great at what you do. You are a storyteller. Just learn to use whatever assets are available to you to best advantage.

"Life has been meant for you to enjoy, but you won't enjoy it unless you pay for it with some good, hard work; this is one price that will never be marked down." - Harpo Marx.
 
For your first five short films you need your camera phone and a
few friends. You can edit on Windows Movie Maker or iMovie.

After you have made the first five you can look into getting a
small video camera like the Canon R32, Panasonic HC-V700 or
Sony HDR-CX160 - all under $500 - and a tripod. Make another
five. If you are still passionate about making movies you can buy
a microphone to get better audio and add some lights to make
your images look better.

Here is a list. You don't need all of this for quite some time but
it will give you good foundation to stand on.
a tripod
6 lights with stands
2 china balls
8 extension cords
6 power strips
black wrap and gels
2 bounce boards
a good external mic
a boom with extension cables
gaffers tape
a bunch of C-47’s - also called “bullets” or wood cloths pins
a coffee maker
a cooler
a slate with marker

If you can afford it - these items you can rent:
a dolly (wheelchair or doorway)
a simple grip kit with:
c-stands (at least 6)
flags (assorted sizes - at least 8)
scrims (at least 6)
silks (at least 2)
cookies (at least 1)
sandbags (one for every light/c-stand and then 6 more)

For now write a few scripts that you easily shoot with your friends and take
those first steps with your phone camera.

That is some darn good advice! Everyone needs time to learn and practice this craft. Most people on this forum, myself included, would consider ourselves a work in progress, and we come from humble beginnings.

Dreamer, since you don't have a smartphone with video capabilities, my advice is that you search ebay for a used miniDV camcorder. You'll want one with manual exposure, white balance, and focus, as well as an external audio input. You should be able to find something like that for less than $200, and you might be surprised with how much mileage you get out of it.

Your first films aren't going to be seen in multiplexes; no need for them to have the highest quality video. All you need is a camera that will help you learn to control the image your audience sees, and an old miniDV camcorder will be more than fine for that. :)
 
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That is some darn good advice! Everyone needs time to learn and practice this craft. Most people on this forum, myself included, would consider ourselves a work in progress, and we come from humble beginnings.

Dreamer, since you don't have a smartphone with video capabilities, my advice is that you search ebay for a used miniDV camcorder. You'll want one with manual exposure, white balance, and focus, as well as an external audio input. You should be able to find something like that for less than $200, and you might be surprised with how much mileage you get out of it.

Your first films aren't going to be seen in multiplexes; no need for them to have the highest quality video. All you need is a camera that will help you learn to control the image your audience sees, and an old miniDV camcorder will be more than fine for that. :)

Lucky Hardwood is nice enough to send me his old camera along with a few rules to follow. I don't understand everyone saying my first films are going to be horrid. My father owns a motorcycle shop so I already have a start! A motorcycle film. My dads friends own a bar (good location), most of my parents friends are bikers (I already have around 20 actors I just have to ask), my brother is a sound tech he's graduated school and everything, and my whole family is supportive of what I'm doing!

Does that sound like a superb start already or what? :D to me it does!
 
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