The White Knight, The Brass Ring, and the Red Camera



This is the original raw file. As you can see it looks great coming off the epic. Yes to all above, lighting and set is important. I did mention them.





These two above are done with the "Nate" setting, where I just dial it in how I think it should look

Here's a more matrix look, not perfect, would need different lighting



So when I look at these images, I'm thinking, wow, this is what I wanted since the first day I started filming. I should also mention that I cropped these, and they are 1/4 res or so. The different shots are from the same frame. They just gave me two raw frames.
 
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Further images



Here's a 300 look, though you don't get it exactly if you cant control the lights





Above is how you can create a universe backdrop with some dust. The downrezzed image just does not do this justice. In fact a still does not do this footage justice. Full res it really looks like a galaxy in certian frames.
 
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You are enjoying some great success, but it isn't the camera. It's you. Your determination and discipline got you where you are, the tools are simply tools. If you had not gone through all of those failures, you would not have garnered the experience you need in order to parlay your gear into success.

Murdock hit the most important take-away from this thread though. It is important to be clear in this business about your goals, and then to let nothing stop you from getting there. I'm actually a complete fucking failure at that second part - but that is another story entire that deserves no further mention.

That point is; however, why I always ask what people ultimately want to do when they ask what camera to buy. If the answers is "I want to direct." I suggest spending their camera $$ on their film, and finding people with whom to work. In fact that's my suggestion for anyone who answers anything other than "Ultimately I want to be a DoP." Cinematography is a specialty, so buying a camera to learn how to use it only to ultimately become a writer seems counter productive.
You made a lot of good points here, sorry it took me so long to answer,

Paragraph 1, yes, it's determination, focus, and above all discipline that create any non-fluke success story

Paragraph 2, Yes Murdock has encapsulated the entire thread in a sentence (no sarcasm) Taking something sprawling and detailed, and making it brief and concise without loosing meaning is a true artform. I salute you sir.

Paragraph 3, My motivation was even simpler. I started out saying the most uninformed thing in the world.
"I want to decide what the movie is"
That's all I cared about. I didn't care about imported glass or warehouse rental or crew salaries or tax incentives or re-labeling bottles with fake company names or what a living wage was in Seattle or anything. In my mind at the time, it all blurred together like that run on sentence.
Yet even after all my education, I just stuck to that basic wish, even though many roads are easier and more sensible. Especially when plotting a career future tactically. You are basically applying to every job or investor and writing in "president of the universe" as "minimum acceptable position"

And yet, it can be done. I'm maybe 40% there, with tons of possibilities for failure left. Ultimately, this is more about money than anything else. The artists, the writers, the talents, are out there to make a great film. The question is, can you fund it, or can you get them to fund it. And that, will lead you off into all sorts of craziness that has little to do with the original desire to decide which classic novels were adapted. Really I should go into real estate and become a producer. But I love cinematography and creative filmmaking, so now I'm really hooked on the process.

Great post David, persevere, I'll invite you out to a shoot next year, when the camel spiders arrive.
 
Really I should go into real estate and become a producer. .
I have always thought this the most sensible thing for a person who wants to make movies in Hollywood. Get rich doing something else THEN go to Hollywood and you're an instant player. I know people who have done just this, sadly their movies have been epic fails. But they really do walk right in the front door and talk to people who matter. Money talks, DLSR's get in line.
 
Paragraph 2, Yes Murdock has encapsulated the entire thread in a sentence (no sarcasm) Taking something sprawling and detailed, and making it brief and concise without loosing meaning is a true artform. I salute you sir.
Thank you. What a nice thing to say. And I mean that in the most non-agressive way possible.;):D I'm decent at Haiku(ms) as well.:blush::lol:
 
I have always thought this the most sensible thing for a person who wants to make movies in Hollywood. Get rich doing something else THEN go to Hollywood and you're an instant player. I know people who have done just this, sadly their movies have been epic fails. But they really do walk right in the front door and talk to people who matter. Money talks, DLSR's get in line.
IMHO this is very true. Alas, still working on the rich part.
 
They say if you're not a rebel at 20 you have no heart, but if you're not establishment by 30, you've got no brain.
Good saying. Good Post.
But - story might be the most important thing for a film, not necessarily for the career.


Murdock - your avatar is intimidating me, can you tone down the aggressiveness a bit?
 
There are actually a significant number of ways that you can become wealthy from cinematography, which makes all this a bit more possible. Not all of it is so great, but for example you can film weddings professionally and break 120k a year.

Stock footage libraries are an option if you have higher end equipment.

Basically you aren't going to be able to avoid going into business and finance. It's completely integral to film.
 
Interesting video Murdock, I think a lot of people are this way, or the reverse of it.

I'm a little scary when you first meet me, like the illustrious mr Cohn mentioned in the video(not ray)

I meet a lot of people that have this inside out though, and they are the ones you have to worry about. Here in California, there are a lot of the nicest acting, most politically correct people, and when you really get to know them they are completely rotted out at the core, typically, almost universally, by self centered thinking.

I work with these two guys that illustrate the personality inversion pretty well. I have one guy that treats me like family on the surface, but shortchanges me on every transaction, and changes the rules as he goes so that he always gets an unfair advantage.

I have this other guy that points out my faults mercilessly, and Just says whats on his mind regardless of whether that's flattering. Often I think the guy doesn't even like me. In my dealings with him, he has been 100% fair and honest. But he doesn't do lip service, or go out of his way to make a situation look better than it is.

I consider the second guy a much more solid friend. He may not shower me with compliments and false hope, but I can trust him, and the honesty of his behavior, and that, is everything.

The point here is that the happiest looking people are often happy because they are succeeding at screwing everyone over, and the unhappy looking people are frequently unhappy because of how hard it is to succeed when you are truly an honest and fair person. So things are often the opposite of how they appear.
 
Interesting video Murdock, I think a lot of people are this way, or the reverse of it.

I'm a little scary when you first meet me, like the illustrious mr Cohn mentioned in the video(not ray)

I meet a lot of people that have this inside out though, and they are the ones you have to worry about. Here in California, there are a lot of the nicest acting, most politically correct people, and when you really get to know them they are completely rotted out at the core, typically, almost universally, by self centered thinking.

I work with these two guys that illustrate the personality inversion pretty well. I have one guy that treats me like family on the surface, but shortchanges me on every transaction, and changes the rules as he goes so that he always gets an unfair advantage.

I have this other guy that points out my faults mercilessly, and Just says whats on his mind regardless of whether that's flattering. Often I think the guy doesn't even like me. In my dealings with him, he has been 100% fair and honest. But he doesn't do lip service, or go out of his way to make a situation look better than it is.

I consider the second guy a much more solid friend. He may not shower me with compliments and false hope, but I can trust him, and the honesty of his behavior, and that, is everything.

The point here is that the happiest looking people are often happy because they are succeeding at screwing everyone over, and the unhappy looking people are frequently unhappy because of how hard it is to succeed when you are truly an honest and fair person. So things are often the opposite of how they appear.
Haha so true.
 
I have this other guy that points out my faults mercilessly, and Just says whats on his mind regardless of whether that's flattering. Often I think the guy doesn't even like me. In my dealings with him, he has been 100% fair and honest. But he doesn't do lip service, or go out of his way to make a situation look better than it is.

You should have this guy read your script. If you post it here in the screenwriting section, you'll have some constructive feedback.

What happened to the Jon Stewart documentary? Has that been permanently shelved?
 
You should have this guy read your script. If you post it here in the screenwriting section, you'll have some constructive feedback.

What happened to the Jon Stewart documentary? Has that been permanently shelved?
My script this time around is written by two guys that have more experience than anyone on this board. One wrote Soylent Green, the other Sid and Nancy. They'd probably shoot me if I posted their script.

I wouldn't say the Jon Stewart documentary has been PERMANENTLY shelved. We had something really cool going on there, for an ultra low budget movie with some market potential. The decision to shelve that project came not from bad news, but from good news. Our abilities and finances began to escalate to where a better project came in range. A group decision amongst my people was made to switch to the more ambitions undertaking. Harry Harrison's "Deathworld". It is a massive meteorite of awesomeness, and once we started looking at the project, we simply couldn't look away.

The first two pictures are me (with no red camera, guys that are saying I'm buying talent) and the second two are by Ignacio, a concept artists on our team.







 
"He could never be as bad as his first impression."

I like that.


I love Aaron Sorkin (particularly Sports Night). But I have a feeling that if I ever met him he would probably just insult me - accurately and cleverly. :)

I have this other guy that points out my faults mercilessly, and Just says whats on his mind regardless of whether that's flattering. Often I think the guy doesn't even like me. In my dealings with him, he has been 100% fair and honest. But he doesn't do lip service, or go out of his way to make a situation look better than it is.
I'm a lot like that. I (mostly) won't do it unless it it's asked for or it directly affects me though. Lately I've been thinking a lot about the notion presented in that Troy Duffy thread/documentary. Thinking maybe being an asshole and being persistently honest are the same thing..

Afterall - EVERYTHING is about relationships, not just careers. Most situations it's best just to bite your tongue..


And for some of that honesty -

Nate, I'd see that movie (whatever it is/turns out to be) based on those four images alone.
I'd see a Jon Stewart documentary too.

which - to get back to the original topic - perhaps you have to have all of the above, everyone's friend/work ethic/Good Story/No freebies/Mr. Red - but most importantly the ability to make smart decisions about which takes priority in any given situation..
 
The most pleasing and revolutionary works are the ones where no one can imagine it *working* beyond the *how* of it's presentation...ie: the form follows perfectly with the work's function....that this art piece could not have been presented any other way and deliver the same impact. That's how, say, an artist can construct a simple piece of paper into a breathtaking form no one has ever seen before. I cannot describe such a concrete thing other than to say, once an artist discovers his/her particular aesthetic, it will be revealed in all their works. May take a lifetime for this epiphany, may come as a flash in the pan only to burn out as fast as it came. JMO
This guy is a genius

"this art piece could not have been presented any other way and deliver the same impact"

That's right, and you can say that about any great work of art that has stood the test of time
 
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