The White Knight, The Brass Ring, and the Red Camera

Nate North

Member
I end up talking about a subject in the forums quite often, but I never bring it up myself, so it always ends up hijacking another's thread

I don't post about this often for the same reason guys like Chill often intercept me. (no problem, I understand clearly why you are doing that, and I don't question your motives at all) Because kids starting out might get discouraged if they hear this type of talk, and of course, that's a bad thing.

Right here I'd like to say that this is an R rated thread, and not for the kids. Bad spoiler alerts for the plot-line of life.

A little history might help more than anything to explain my opinions (and that's all they are people)

On a clear and sunny day in late 2007, I stepped into best buy with a sparkle in my eye. I had figured it out, I had the magic formula. I proceeded directly to buy a Canon 30d for a couple grand. And a Sony HDR-1 for a grand and a half.

I went out that same day and began shooting. First I shot with the HDR-1. Even with zero experience, the footage was so bad that I knew I would never even watch a short made with this. I used it to do some SFX tests and then quickly discarded and sold it. The canon's still images were great. I shot a million great pictures with it, some were really good. I went to sell still images and uploaded them to several large sites, filling out dozens of pages of paperwork to do so. An email comes. Your footage is now for sale! I go to the site. There are 381,000 pages with 100 results each. I check through the first few pages, and it's not there. I do a search for the names of my clips. I look through 17 pages of results for the exact name of my clip. I find it, and locate it's category. I go to just that subcategory, and I search through pages until I fall asleep without finding it.

This isn't working. I ponder. Let's amp this up. I shoot time-lapse. Beautiful 6 hour sequences that watch evenings evolve in the city, an eclipse, famous landmarks. I send it in. Page 15. My clips are 10 pages back from the last clip making any money.

Ponder. Level up. I spend 8 months making a feature length film shot at 3k resolution in 4:4:4 color-space on the canon. People say its fantastic. I can't sell it. I end up making back the budget, my personal overhead has negated that 3x over in that time span. It opens some doors for me, get's people to listen. Some become real fans of the film. I make connections with others in the traction-less low end of the industry.

Ponder. Level up. I need more volume. Web advertising. Corporate backing. I go to Vuze. I establish the #1 show on the entire channel of 10 million daily viewers. Several times a week I put out a good 22 minute HD show reviewing just one game in a cinematic fashion. I get over a million ad sponsored HD downloads, I'm invited to corporate headquarters, I get the personal phone and email of the head of the network, we become friends, I'm promoted actively. In the final days I was on the start page of the corporation. I got a check for 400 dollars. One of the guys at vuze told me they all chipped in so the check wouldn't be so small. I'd lost about 30k in overhead in that time.

Ponder. I'm bleeding out now. Think hard Nate, you won't survive another year. I'm too broke to buy equipment now. I've sold my camera to stave off eviction. I switch to CGI. I find that I can sell CGI commercials for sometimes several thousand a piece. I start getting more regular work doing commercials, and target the content weak signage industry. I learn to create a website and custom art to strengthen my image and organizational skills.

I've had to move in a roommate now to make rent, but I'm becoming stable. My work is good, and there's little competition. I approach a larger company. I call the guy, and make friends with him. I take a strong stance and push my agenda, always pinging on the cash benefits to him. I'm in. I do the best work I can, but within a year I know corporate work will not help you build a film reel, or the money to fund a project.

I'm stuck. This isn't where I want to be, and despite a crazy amount of thought and effort, I'm so close to square 1 I can reach out and touch it.

I sit at a bar one day talking about film. A grizzled 55 year old man that still wears band t shirts is half drunk at 5 pm. Overhearing, he chimes in. "I've been doing film and video my whole life" He smiles at me, revealing several missing teeth. Just got the newest prosumer camera, gonna go out and film the art fair. 200 dollars, in the bank"

Please god no, I think, not me, I was supposed to be somebody. I buy him a drink, he doesn't realize it's a consolation prize for not winning at life.

I'm thinking harder than ever now, desperate, knowing that the rubick's cube does have a solution, but not seeing it yet.

Between jobs, I'm studying hard. Finding the answer. I've gotten so much experience now, but every case study I look at where someone is profitable in film is miles above my financial range. My next area of study is financial range. I watch Buffalo 66. A guy that looks and thinks like a gas station attendant has thrown together 1.5 million dollars. Scratch head.

First I clarify the final motive. Blade Runner, LA Confidential, Casino, Predator, Avatar, Star Wars, Minority Report. I know already that I won't be truly happy until I'm there. The Brass ring. A movie that exits to entertain an entire world of people, a movie that audiences love and watch over and over.

Second I look at where I'm at, where we're all at. A crusader for the underdog, a guy that wants to say yes because they know how tough it is when everyone is saying no regardless of your effort. The White Night is optimistic, kind, accepting, a person that wants to believe in himself, and others in the same situation. But I'm looking over on box office mojo, and imdb, and there aren't any stories about people that made a great film and money with my 250 dollar a month budget. I study what cameras, lighting, actors, financial setups, investment scenarios, workspaces, editing decks, matte boxes, filters, plot devices, scene blocking, foley elements and everything else that the people that are winning are using. I dont see any information about friends in my back yard and a camera from best buy.

I work crazy hours on any job I get and buy the Red Epic. I get a pro lighting guy, a famous author, 2 famous artists, a sytheyes guy, several investors, and then ally with another production company that has put together similar resources and has also made a feature. I get famous directors on the phone and befriend them. We start seeing the possibility for a large joint studio emerge from the excel spreadsheets.

The epic is a big deal to me. It means I have a siege gun capable of hitting the brass ring if I can learn to aim it well enough (metaphor). But it turns out the camera is even a bigger deal to others. With my name attached to a real movie camera, more people start listening. The camera is sort of like an A-lister you can buy, and put in your passenger seat. It gets me into meetings with people that wouldn't otherwise listen. I get immediate respect and a callback from other filmmakers. It's a bargaining chip with crew as well. The footage is breathtaking. Not "perfectly good" like a DSLR, but breathtaking. You can just aim it at a fountain at night and hit 300fps, and it's instantly the best footage you ever produced.

My ultimate conclusion was that the White Knight had to be left behind to reach the brass ring via the red camera. A good attitude and cheap equipment, letting in every friend I met at the bar, saying yes to everyone, walking into an investors office with that naive happy look in my eye, none of it would work. I wanted to be that guy, but the choice became mutually exclusive.

Today We have 3 Reds coming in, a set of Ziess super primes, some angenuix zooms, and a crew of over 25 coming in over the next 2 years. We're lobbying for filmmaker tax incentives, building a real studio, and connecting to great people across the world.

They say if you're not a rebel at 20 you have no heart, but if you're not establishment by 30, you've got no brain. So I'm doing things their way now. Using their cameras, submitting scripts in their format, and talking to bankers about the bottom line. And there's a light at the end of the tunnel now. Flickering in the distance.

In 2007 she called me, and I would have called back, Just a little more money, just enough that I didn't have to draw someone into my financial quicksand. Just enough to support a family. I'd call her back as soon as I had it. As soon as I wasn't a bum anymore. She was so intelligent and beautiful, she deserved better than, "can I borrow some money"

I bought into the DSLR hype, I bought in to the web show hype, I bought into hope, and last year she got knocked up by some guy that keeps getting arrested for beating her.

Things could have been different. Thanks DSLR hype. Thanks web idiots that tell each other there's money out there. Thanks optimistic knights of the people that shout down anyone saying you have to spend a lot, or work super hard to get this. I listened to all of you, once. But time ran out for me, as I listened to 100 versions of "you can make it with nothing"

If anyone posts, "story is whats most important", I swear to god, I swear to F&*&&*&g god. I've spent 5 grand licensing a bestseller from a world famous author. So Im growing a bit weary of this uninformed kneejerk response every time I mention wanting to get some screen resolution. (anyone that talks screen qualtiy has forgotten story? WTF?)

If you were me, and had gone through what I've gone through, you'd be a little offended too.

So that, is why I talk to people about better equipment, about borrowing money, about not doing small scale projects with no payoff. To help them avoid loosing those years of life that I lost.

Does a beginner need this advice? No, absolutely not. But for some of you out there, this is a good talk about the nature of reality. I lost a lot through my mistakes, and try to help others avoid them.
 
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JoshL

Member
Great post, needs some re-reading before I actually have anything productive to say, but one comment is, if you had the Red, day 1, would you be where you are? It may have opened some doors that weren't opened at the time, but would you have had the skills to back it up?

I do understand why "story is all" makes you bitter. You do need good tools. You need the experience to use them well. And above all, you need to WORK, which you have done.

Maybe I have more optimism because I'm closer to the beginning of my journey (and looking for a slightly different ring, but the concepts are the same). But you put in the work, and you made the investments and learned to work with others and make connections. You're doing it, and that's AWESOME! (and since 2007? That's really a pretty short road!)
 

Nate North

Member
I feel like I could have saved 2 years of my life with it. No one is breaking through the iron curtain on day one. And I'm not writing this to depress people, Just a slice of life that may apply to many.

Keep your optimism, but not the naivete, that's my advice. You'll never make it without the optimism

And thanks for the kind words Josh, you can probably tell, I still need them
 

rayw

Member
(Finishes story)
"Oh!... That wasn't you poking fun at people obsessing over equipment, was it. That was serious. Got it".

Sorry. I just watched CLUB DREAD last night and kept reading your post in Bill Paxton's insincere "story voice".

D@mn.

Now I gotta go back and read it again in Tom Hanks "wizened mature man" voice.

(Then I'll try it in Sam L. Jackson "bad muther f#cker" voice)!

Wish me luck!
 

Nate North

Member
good luck buddy, its a tough read, and it was a tough write. Some days I just want to stop the merry go round and talk real life.
 

rayw

Member
Nah, it wasn't that bad to read.

I just think of myself as a sperm.
I'm out here doing whatever I can to the (near/sensible) best of my abilities.
I ain't (real) stupid.
I know there's sixteen million other sperms right here with me, and we're all just doing our thing. And right behind me is squirt number two.
BAM!
That makes thirty-two million jack offs going for the brass ring of knockin' up that one egg at the end of the tunnel.

Those are some pretty ugly odds.

And you know what? That egg might be a dud.
True!
I could be that one special sperm and get all the way there, dig in and the story of life just... thhp!
Nothin'. Doesn't happen.
Maybe egg and me'll get lucky, get a little action going on, but thhp! No implant.
Maybe we'll implant but die in production hell.
Maybe we'll debut with the ugliest bastard this week.
Maybe we'll make a ADHD go-nowhere, do-nothing, unremarkable proletariat posterchild.
Maybe we'll make the next president of the PTA.
Maybe we'll make the next president of Sam's Club.
Maybe we'll make POTUS.

But if we just quit right now... ain't nothin' gonna happen, fo-sho.
;)

Thank you for sharing your experience. Sincerely. (in my Tom Hanks "wizened mature man" voice).
 
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CHamburger

Member
Your story provided some great insight. It is much appreciated on my end of the World Wide Web. Good luck, and whatever you do remember, "Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering." I don't know how much this opertains to you but I always find Star Wars quotes relevant :D
 

NickClapper

Member
I really enjoyed reading that. Not from any perverse satisfaction but from the fact that it was interesting, well written and definitely a well argued case.

The thing is that life, through any course that it takes, is subject to so many external forces that it becomes very hard to speak of things in terms of facts or right and wrong. You have a very clear experience (and it may well be the most common experience) that means that you want to give advice in a certain direction. That advice might be the best advice in the world, I don't know. But you shouldn't feel frustrated by people who counter this advice- it's not that they're wrong where you're right or vice versa, it's simply that there are so many different, imperceptible worlds moving about here that we can't all be nailing our colours to the same flag. The majority of people here are working on budgets that mean that they can't afford the RED even if they were to gamble and lay down their life savings. Privately I might agree that no-one should really make a feature with a DSLR but as a film enthusiast (rather than maker) I just think it's great and to be encouraged that there are people who want to get out of the house and make films.

And, yes, I do think that, for 87% of people who come to this forum looking for answers, story is more important than the camera. Sorry! :D
 

Nate North

Member
Nah, it wasn't that bad to read.

I just think of myself as a sperm.
I'm out here doing whatever I can to the (near/sensible) best of my abilities.
I ain't (real) stupid.
I know there's sixteen million other sperms right here with me, and we're all just doing our thing. And right behind me is squirt number two.
BAM!
That makes thirty-two million jack offs going for the brass ring of knockin' up that one egg at the end of the tunnel.

Those are some pretty ugly odds.

But if we just quit right now... ain't nothin' gonna happen, fo-sho.
;)

Thank you for sharing your experience. Sincerely. (in my Tom Hanks "wizened mature man" voice).
I disagree! My view is that there are no odds. There is only achievement. I'll back it up. Let's take science fiction for example. On any given year, there are only about 12 really good sci-fi movies, the ones you remember. Do you think the studio is turning away Blade Runners 10 at the time? There's 7 billion people and only one cartoon as good as Family guy? You don't have 16 million competitors, you have 16 million wannabees. Once you become a competitor, that number shrinks drastically. Once you are as good as a hollywood director, there are less than 1000 competitors world wide.

Eddie Van Halen was always going to be a famous guitarist, and my kid brother was never going to be one. It's not like someone flipped a coin out there to decide.

Just an opinion, thanks for reading my post ray
 

Nate North

Member
I really enjoyed reading that. Not from any perverse satisfaction but from the fact that it was interesting, well written and definitely a well argued case.

The thing is that life, through any course that it takes, is subject to so many external forces that it becomes very hard to speak of things in terms of facts or right and wrong. You have a very clear experience (and it may well be the most common experience) that means that you want to give advice in a certain direction. That advice might be the best advice in the world, I don't know. But you shouldn't feel frustrated by people who counter this advice- it's not that they're wrong where you're right or vice versa, it's simply that there are so many different, imperceptible worlds moving about here that we can't all be nailing our colours to the same flag. The majority of people here are working on budgets that mean that they can't afford the RED even if they were to gamble and lay down their life savings. Privately I might agree that no-one should really make a feature with a DSLR but as a film enthusiast (rather than maker) I just think it's great and to be encouraged that there are people who want to get out of the house and make films.

And, yes, I do think that, for 87% of people who come to this forum looking for answers, story is more important than the camera. Sorry! :D
Thank you Nick, that's an honest and well thought out reply. I guess I would say that this advice applies only to people making a life descision to pursue film long term. In other situations, the other advice is better, I agree. I just felt like no one was speaking up for people like me, who put a lot on the line, and truly believe that movies belong in theaters. Where everyone can enjoy them, and where some guy like me can go on a rainy afternoon and forget about their troubles. For me, providing that, really repaying that back to the world, is what it's all about.
 

Murdock

Member
What a refreshing post. Seriously. I think it is a very valid point you are making. Anyone who gets into this thing needs to be very clear about their goals and ambitions and be equally clear on how to get there.
 

Nate North

Member
Hopefully I've made some of how to get there marginally more clear. A big deal is all the dead ends I went down. It was just wasted time, and all along, there were people telling me it was going to work out. Sometimes the best advice is not to listen to advice. To keep your own council, and just see clearly what is.

It's also important to think of the ripple effect, where film, and the decisions you make regarding it, effect others in your life. I guess that's just a general plug for thinking ahead.
 
Thanks for being so open with your experience. Everyone's path is different and yours is inspiring. To get where you are now in just a few years is simply amazing.

Regarding story vs camera, I think it's clear that the best camera with a crap story is useless. But I think your point is rather: what's a good story with a crap camera? You mentioned “Blade Runner”. It's one of my favorite movies. I made this thought experiment of trying to imagine it filmed with a DSLR. It makes me shudder. It's like trying to imagine “Mona Lisa” made with crayons. So, if you have a really good story, and you said you bought one, I understand why you went for RED.

I'm sorry to say that my first gut reaction to DSLR image was not good. It's been tempered through habituation as I watched more and more videos in IT's screening room. I've come to truly admire people trying to make the best of what they can afford. I'm very curious about “Tiny furniture” which seems to be the first widely known DSLR feature film. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be available through Netflix.

From time to time, you can also see videos shot with a RED (though not the Epic) in IT's screening room. You'll still have a lot of work to make it look good.

I can't help wondering why you still hang around with us at IT. RED users have their own forum. Money- and production value-wise they're probably closer to you than we are. Could it be that despite all you said, you're still a white knight underdog at heart?

I wish you success with your feature film. I rarely go to the movie theater these days, but if I see your name on the poster, I'll make an exception.
 

brianluce

Member
I'm not sure I really get it. At one point you disdain those who extol the value of story, then you turn around and say how you've spent 5k to secure legal rights to a bestseller.

I'm glad the Epic has proven to be a silver bullet for you but for every Nate North there are literally thousands of REDs sitting on shelves collecting dust and mocking busted dreams. I've also seen some genuinely crummy stuff shot on RED and your claims fly in the face of conventional wisdom with regards to filmmaking. Composition and lighting make great images, not RED 4k. Nope, pointing an Epic at a fountain at 300 fps will NOT instantly be the best thing I ever shot. The way you feel about "Story matters most"? That's how I feel about slow motion footage. It's an overused gimmick with limited application -- the only time I care to see it is watching a instant replay before breaking to a commercial during a Laker game.

My take away from your tale is that you're a guy who knows how to get in the front door and make connections, and it looks like you used an Epic as the pry bar, could just have easily have been a pitch, a script, a graphic novel or any number of things. But in actual fact, the DLSR revolution, the Webisode revolution are no more cliche than the RED revolution.

You seem to be saying mortgage your house to buy expensive high end gear. That to have credibility, you have to make that all or nothing financial bet. That's about the worst, most ruinous advice a person could give on a film forum. RED as a permanently attached A lister? That a dangerous metaphor and inaccurate , there are over 5,000 Red Ones last I checked. 6,000. There sure aren't 6,000 A listers. Reds are as common as a Hollywood hooker -- probably a better metaphor, as a RED, like a hooker, is likely to leave you heartbroken and penniless.

Overall I don't get your forlorn tone either, shouldn't you be doing a victory lap? You seem to be doing good right now right? Are you upset that not all the membership here has thrown themselves into it to the extent you have? Some of us can't Nate, We've got kids that need college tuition funds.

Thanks for the post though, entertaining and interesting, I just don't agree with it. I wish you'd tell us the secrets of getting in the front door, you seem to have a knack for it.
 

CHamburger

Member
I'm not sure I really get it. At one point you disdain those who extol the value of story, then you turn around and say how you've spent 5k to secure legal rights to a bestseller.

From my reading of the post, I got that he liscensed the author's story under the impression that story was what you needed. Upon getting no return from the investment, the disdain emerged.

Also, I don't think he's saying to do anything. I think he's just giving a slice of reality that people sometimes forget. Sort of a PSA for the IT community. Obviously some people that have more resources might have it easier but most people aren't sons of Will Smith or Aaron Spelling.

Long story short, success isn't made over night.

Good Luck Nate!
 
"We've got kids that need college tuition funds."

Yep. We have to live the potentially egomanical fantasy that we ARE Eddie Van Halen. That we have got "it" whatever "it" is. I have a "straight" job, making about 80K a year. I wouldn't/couldn't even consider the idea of leaving it to pursue the "dream" of being a filmmaker. What I CAN do is keep making movies, progressively better (I hope) movies, in the hope that eventually they become SO good that I can convince people to give me a few hundred thousand for a low budget feature. If it never happens, well, it was fun anyway.
 

rayw

Member
I wouldn't/couldn't even consider the idea of leaving it to pursue the "dream" of being a filmmaker. What I CAN do is keep making movies, progressively better (I hope) movies, in the hope that eventually they become SO good that I can convince people to give me a few hundred thousand for a low budget feature. If it never happens, well, it was fun anyway.
That's my approach as well.

There are both pro and recreational... pretty much any and everything out there from fishing to ballet.

For most, filmmaking is a hobby.
And it can be just as an expensive hobby as anything else.

H3ll, some folks spend hundreds of dollars, if not thousands, each year just to WATCH other people goof off.

Consider a NASCAR race. Only one of those turkey's is gonna win! But there are dozens of racing teams out there spending hundreds of thousands, if not millions, just to... what? KNOW there's darn near no chance to actually win?
And WTH is the audience of fifty thousand and satellite viewers paying to watch all of them doing?

How about all these folks on their Harley's? Think that's cheap just to drive around... looking cool?
Nope.


There's no delusional dreaming going on here.
I'm just putzin' around having fun.

Only crazy people JUST KNOW! they're gonna be the next Michael Bay/Jerry Bruckheimer all rolled into one.
Pfft.
 

Nate North

Member
Thanks for being so open with your experience. Everyone's path is different and yours is inspiring. To get where you are now in just a few years is simply amazing.

Regarding story vs camera, I think it's clear that the best camera with a crap story is useless. But I think your point is rather: what's a good story with a crap camera? You mentioned “Blade Runner”. It's one of my favorite movies. I made this thought experiment of trying to imagine it filmed with a DSLR. It makes me shudder. It's like trying to imagine “Mona Lisa” made with crayons. So, if you have a really good story, and you said you bought one, I understand why you went for RED.
I can't help wondering why you still hang around with us at IT. RED users have their own forum. Money- and production value-wise they're probably closer to you than we are. Could it be that despite all you said, you're still a white knight underdog at heart?

I wish you success with your feature film. I rarely go to the movie theater these days, but if I see your name on the poster, I'll make an exception.
At this point I'm actually amazed that someone gets me. Thank god you are out there.

That's exactly correct. Putting story first was so blatantly, blatantly obvious, that I did it first, then moved on to these other components of the chain. A previous poster said we all have different viewpoints and situations. When people keep telling me I should write a story first, It's like I drove over to their house to pick them up for lunch, and when they get in the car, they adapt a superior tone and say "you should push on your gas pedal" As though everyone except them had forgotten this, and totally ignoring the fact that if you didn't know how to use the gas pedal, you wouldn't be at their house in the first place.

But you have absolutely nailed it. Once you have a good story to tell, and the setup to accomplish it, you don't want to dull the final product by 30%. For me it would be like composing this amazing guitar song, and then recording it with a rubber band around the guitar neck.

Thanks for your post
 

Nate North

Member
I'm not sure I really get it. At one point you disdain those who extol the value of story, then you turn around and say how you've spent 5k to secure legal rights to a bestseller.

I'm glad the Epic has proven to be a silver bullet for you but for every Nate North there are literally thousands of REDs sitting on shelves collecting dust and mocking busted dreams. I've also seen some genuinely crummy stuff shot on RED and your claims fly in the face of conventional wisdom with regards to filmmaking. Composition and lighting make great images, not RED 4k. Nope, pointing an Epic at a fountain at 300 fps will NOT instantly be the best thing I ever shot. The way you feel about "Story matters most"? That's how I feel about slow motion footage. It's an overused gimmick with limited application -- the only time I care to see it is watching a instant replay before breaking to a commercial during a Laker game.

My take away from your tale is that you're a guy who knows how to get in the front door and make connections, and it looks like you used an Epic as the pry bar, could just have easily have been a pitch, a script, a graphic novel or any number of things. But in actual fact, the DLSR revolution, the Webisode revolution are no more cliche than the RED revolution.

You seem to be saying mortgage your house to buy expensive high end gear. That to have credibility, you have to make that all or nothing financial bet. That's about the worst, most ruinous advice a person could give on a film forum. RED as a permanently attached A lister? That a dangerous metaphor and inaccurate , there are over 5,000 Red Ones last I checked. 6,000. There sure aren't 6,000 A listers. Reds are as common as a Hollywood hooker -- probably a better metaphor, as a RED, like a hooker, is likely to leave you heartbroken and penniless.

Overall I don't get your forlorn tone either, shouldn't you be doing a victory lap? You seem to be doing good right now right? Are you upset that not all the membership here has thrown themselves into it to the extent you have? Some of us can't Nate, We've got kids that need college tuition funds.

Thanks for the post though, entertaining and interesting, I just don't agree with it. I wish you'd tell us the secrets of getting in the front door, you seem to have a knack for it.
I do not disdain those who extol the virtue of story. It's just that when someone says a sentence to me, I don't want them telling me they used the alphabet to make up the words every time. It's so obvious, that it just becomes spam, like if someone told me 50 times that I should use actors in my films. It's not bad advice, it's just pointless advice for anyone but a beginner. How would you feel if every time you posted about some new technique you used, someone came along and admonished you to "make sure you record it" Story is that obvious to me. It's what you're filming. I don't see it as less important than a camera.

The camera is simply a percentile gate at the end of your film that reduces quality. So if I make a 100% story, and run it through a 60% camera, my final score is 60% or F. As opposed to 100% or A. When there's an ever growing number of people that count on you. You do everything in your power to get that A.

Maybe the A-lister metaphor was weak, but showing people you are serious goes a long way, however you do it. And contrary to popular belief, I'm not hung up on Red itself. What I wanted was a fluid and vibrant 4:4:4 camera that could produce uncompressed footage. It wouldn't have mattered what it was called. As far as red footage being able to turn out bad or good, I'm absolutely aware of that. I just have the skill to make it turn out fantastic, so I speak from that mentality.

I certainly didn't say that I was upset by anything anyone else is doing here. I wish you all the best, and take no issue whatsoever with any of your methods or viewpoints. My issue with some has nothing to do with filmmaking and has to do with reading between the lines and jumping to assumptions. I mention one slow mo scene and you're all over me as some idiot that can't film and wants to use slo-mo to conceal his lack of talent. Going from what I said, that's a pretty large and unfair assumption.
 
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