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Plot problem because of topic

Hi, guys!
I’m working on a superhero project. It’s about teens, whose parents are superheroes. Those kids go together to a high school. (I know I told a lot about this.) But I can’t always tell about the teen’s problems. That’d be more a telenovela. Am I right? And I can’t let them fight at the end á la Power Rangers. So, any tips for the plot?
P.S. I think that stuff stopped me from writing.
 

Alcove Audio

Business Member
indieBIZ
It's all about research. How much research have you done about absent parenting, ignored children, etc.? What behaviors do these children exhibit?

Solid writing and acting should get these issues across without your project becoming a soap opera. Just a brief conversation amongst a few of the characters or a scene or two at home with(out) the superhero parents should give the audience enough information to recognize the issues that they are facing. My own father traveled quite bit for his work, so he wasn't around for a lot of things - really pissed me off. But the same is true of military families whose parents can be away for months and even years at a time. There are those who, despite being home, are still absent parents, so involved in work/career that they are oblivious to the needs of their children. What about wealthy parents who farm out the parenting to nannies, maids, private schools, etc.?

Come on, this is the real work of screenwriting - research, research, research, rewrite, rewrite, rewrite.

How about a scene of a school event (sports, concert, play or something similar) where none of the parents are there; they're all out and about doing super heroic things. How do the kids react? Pissed off, resigned or (most probably) a mix of the two? The various reactions would give insights into your characters. Or, better yet, all the parents are there, then every beeper and cell phone goes off and they all fly away, leaving a venue empty of adults. It could even be your opening scene.

Oh, BTW, do the children have superpowers or are they "normal?"
 
Alcove Audio. Yeah, I know about that topic a little bit. At least because many classmates, I had, had such problems like bad families, depression, etc. Many of them made it to the best thing. However, many other ones used it to get attention. They were such bold and kissed the teacher's ass with it to get better marks. I know. Not everybody is like this. But hey! Those disgusting people exist. Unfortunately! However, many of those people, who have stuff like depression, wants to be treated as an ordinary person. Even if they have suicide thought. They don't want to be that kid, who gets those sayings like "Aw! Did you get depression? That must be really terrible". No. They want to be treated normally.
 

Alcove Audio

Business Member
indieBIZ
And with your above post you have just presented the foundation of your character developments - expand on this.

The point of your first post was that you wanted tp avoid the soap-opera/tele-novella vibe. That comes down to your writing, not the subject matter.
 
Why should you tell about the kids problems? That is a huge misunderstanding I see a lot. A screenplay is not about general philosophical issues or about giving your soul to the paper or about expressing your inner opinions about something or about showing a problematic situation in teens lives! All these are tools that favor the STORY. YOU MUST FIND A STORY. A man wants that, but he hesitates and then something happens and after this, that other thing happens and then he goes for it but then that happens and he realizes that and then Ohh I didn't expected that... such things. A STORY. If you don't find a story you will never succeed.

So you want tips for the plot, but about which story's plot? No one cares for a movie without a STORY.
 
And with your above post you have just presented the foundation of your character developments - expand on this.

This. 1000x this.

The key words are “character development”. What’s the main story arc? The things that are happening in the margins - the issues the kids are dealing with outside the story arc - shape who they are and affect the decisions they make and the ways they respond to the challenges. If the audience doesn’t know anything about the characters, it’s hard to understand why they behave the way they do.

You can drop hints throughout the screenplay to show the audience why these kids are who they are. There are many tools for this, from the subtle to the dramatic. A passing conversation in the hall is subtle. Two kids in a quiet corner of the library, one confiding in the other, is a little more overt. Flashbacks in the heat of a conflict are up front and dramatic.

As a viewer, if I know nothing about the character’s background, I have a hard time connecting with that character, or really caring much about what they say or do.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
P.S. I think that stuff stopped me from writing.
This is not a P.S. - this is your primary problem.

Many beginning writers have a situation, have some characters
maybe even have a “theme", but they don't have a story they
want to tell.

Thus we get the question, “So, any tips for the plot?”

You want to write a script about teens whose parents are superheros
but you don't have a story you want to tell. That is what is stopping
you from writing. No one can give you any tips for the the plot. The
plot needs to be the story YOU want to tell.

What is the story you have the desire to tell others? Don't tell us the
characters or character types or the situation. Don't tell us what you
can't let them do. Tell us the story you want to tell.
 

sfoster

Staff Member
Moderator
I dont understand why the topic is giving you a plot problem ?
I dont understand the title of your thread at all.

There are so many great numbers of superhero movies being made, even some superhero teenage movies and tv shows and none of them have any problems with the plot. So why are you blaming the topic?

Thats a rhetorical question BTW.
 

Alcove Audio

Business Member
indieBIZ
What you need to do is identify your central theme.

You have the "who" - the children of superheroes.

You have the "where" - a high school.

But 'what" is going to happen and "why" are those events going to happen? That is what you need to identify. The character development is the reactions of the players to the events.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
How about a girl who pretends to have superpowers, and somehow gets away with it at the school (which is only for those with powers)... with superior natural ability/trickery etc...

There's another girl that knows but no one believes her, but she is always trying to prove it (like the neighbor in Bewitched)...

Like this but the opposite, proving NO super powers...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dt5kPC7Bqq0

Okay well I did your job for you. I'm not supposed to do that.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
Which makes her more of a role model, because she solves her issues with "real" powers not super ones, like every other kid (your audience)...
 
Why not a series where all the parents are aliens... but the teenagers are just humans. During the series the discover that their parents are not their parents....
 
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