Movie Scenes to Recreate

Hi i am starting youtube channel with vfx, little cgi and acting/short films and i am looking for inspiration. I love cinematography and for now i found 2 scenes that i like. The first is from Now You See Me 2 where Atlas freezes the rain and another scene from Buried from 2010 where the actor is trapped in a coffin. Tell me other scenes that you like or looks cool. It doesnt matter if it has vfx or not. I will try my best to do it.
 
Why would you want to waste time and effort in recreating a scene when you can make your own new shit. Time is too valuable to be wasted.

Says the guy who just takes actual movie clips and changes the sound or adds a few cheap graphics on top.

Trying to recreate scenes from scratch, including lighting, cinematography, and CGI can be a great way to learn different techniques. It makes for a good, hands-on learning process.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
indiePRO
Why would you want to waste time and effort in recreating a scene when you can make your own new shit. Time is too valuable to be wasted.

Why would you want to waste time and effort putting fellow filmmakers down?
He asked a simple question. You didn't answer, you were rude and disrespectful.
I don't see how that contributes to this community of filmmakers.

borkoborko39, I agree with AcousticAl, recreating scenes can be a valuable
lesson in cinematography, lighting and story telling. Want a real challenge?
How about the restaurant scene from "Goodfellas"? You could go really old
school and try the opening scene from Fritz Lang's "M". Maybe the coin toss
scene from "No Country for Old Men". Anything from the "Star Trek"/"Star Wars"
franchise would be great to try some CG and VFX. How about doing your own
take on the famous Kobayashi Maru rescue mission?
 
Like learning how to use those many lens flares in Star Trek.
I'm not trying to degrade anyone. All I am saying is create your own content if you're going to film something.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
This is a great idea for a YT channel. I'm not sure why Quality objects he himself has a YT channel, titling over famous films.

Anywho... these would make great tutorials. Is that your angle? Like "Ever wonder how they lit that scene in _____? Well we did our best here:" (Show all the lights you used, color grading, etc.)

Another angle is, how to do it on a strict budget. So if you are pulling all this off with Home Depot lighting, kudos!

Looking forward to your channel.
 
This is a really great idea. A chance to learn and have fun without going all-in on an independent film. I'll definitely check it out!

As for scenes, how about the bloody bed scene or the girl on the walls and ceiling (both from Nightmare on Elm Street)? Both were incredibly difficult in 1984 and would be fun to recreate 30 years later with modern VFX.
 
Well the stuff I do, everything is in post so it takes nothing pretty much, as long as you know how to edit. But he's talking about actors, locations, lighting, food etc. Is it worth it? It sounds costly.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
I may have read it wrong and maybe he just wants to learn by recreating these, and not use them on the channel? But I like the tutorial idea. If you learn from it, you can help others and YT needs come good channels. ;)

Either way let us know about the channel.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
indiePRO
It cost me nothing to do those things. What you are trying to do, will cost you a lot.
What is it to you if a filmmaker wants to spend a lot of money? In your
first comment you didn't mention money, you only mentioned "time
and effort".
Like learning how to use those many lens flares in Star Trek.
I'm not trying to degrade anyone. All I am saying is create your own content if you're going to film something.
What's wrong with learning to how to use those many lens flares in Star Trek?

You may not be trying to degrade anyone but your comment is rude and
disrespectful and does nothing to help borkoborko39. Saying that what he
wants to do is "a waste time and effort" is at the very least not helpful. If
YOU don't want to do it that's YOUR choice. No need to put him down for
wanting to try it.

You spend time and effort on a YT channel that I have no interest in. I have
NEVER comment in a negative way when you post you videos. I see no need
to tell you how YOU should spend your time and effort. Perhaps that's why I
feel it's disrespectful of you to tell other filmmaker how they should spend
their time, effort and money.

We do not need to be endlessly encouraging here on indietalk. But just because
YOU wouldn't spend money, time and effort on recreating scenes from movies
doesn't mean you need to tell borkoborko39 what he wants to do is "a waste
time and effort". It isn't. It's a wonderful way to learn.
 
Life is about balance in whatever you do. You can't just think positive, you must see the negative factors as well. For example a guy wants to bungee jump or sky drive. He's all pumped and wanting to go, he's not thinking about failure, or what can happen. There must always be someone to ask what if. If the positives out throw the negatives then by all means do it. That's all I was trying to do in my response. I would support any project on this forum.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
He's not jumping off a cliff he's trying to learn by those he's inspired by. Buying a book costs $, film school costs $, this is his way of learning. If you want to warn him of the dangers, great. You've done so.

Now let's keep this on track of suggestions. :)
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
indiePRO
Life is about balance in whatever you do. You can't just think positive, you must see the negative factors as well. For example a guy wants to bungee jump or sky drive.
You are comparing life and death to spending “a lot” of money. If he fails all
he does is spend money he wants to spend and learns a little something
about making movies. There is no downside to that. He will not die or
injure anyone.

He's all pumped and wanting to go, he's not thinking about failure, or what can happen. There must always be someone to ask what if.
Okay, I understand. You feel you are the person to warn fellow filmmakers
that they may fail.
If the positives out throw the negatives then by all means do it. That's all I was trying to do in my response.
You're replies are often very short and unclear. Your first reply did not
come across as helpful or even asking "what if". Perhaps you could be
more clear when you respond to peoples questions. Since you feel the
responsibility to warn people about the possibility of failing perhaps you
should elaborate a little when replying. As you can see we all misunderstood
your intent. You are a writer. How a writer communicates is essential.

I understand now that your intent was not to be rude, dismissive or
disrespectful even though that's the way your comment seemed. I hope
you can understand that your terse reply could be seen that way.

I would support any project on this forum.
Now that you have warned borkoborko39 that what he wants to do is
a waste of time and effort and will cost a lot of money do you have any
words of support for his project? Maybe a suggestion or two of scenes
he could try...

You never answered my questions; what is it to you if a filmmaker wants
to spend a lot of money on a project?

I'll answer your question; "Is it worth it?" Yes it is. Learning by emulating
(and even straight up copying) the work of other filmmakers is very worth
it. Learning how to hire actors, secure locations, figure out the right lighting,
how much food costs (and what cast and crew want to eat) and managing
a production is worth it.
 
Why would you want to waste time and effort in recreating a scene when you can make your own new shit. Time is too valuable to be wasted.

Not wasted time at all. As a working musician I spent hours learning songs by other people, from Bach to the Beatles to Black-eyed Peas. Was that wasted time? As a musician and audio engineer I would try to recreate sounds, and with the advent of MIDI and all of the other wonderful advances since then I have attempted to recreate entire tracks. (A while back I completed a recreation [sans vocals] of the Karn Evil 9, Impression 1, Parts 1 & 2, by Emerson, Lake and Palmer that had some of my compatriots saying "Holy shit!" I learned a lot about how some sounds were created and that ELP definitely played by feel, because the tempos were all over the place. I have done the same with audio from film scenes. C'mon, there are tribute bands that make their living by recreating the experience of the original performer(s)/performance(s).

You are not recreating a scene just for the sake of recreating the scene, you are learning how things were done. You might learn that moving the one light (as an example) can make or break the visual mood of the scene. You might learn that you really do (or do not) need that one expensive lens to get that one specific shot.

Any time spent learning IS NOT WASTED!
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
Flip the coin.

Making your own "shit" could be wasting time if you do it w/o any knowledge. Never discourage learning. Ever.
 
Dipping my toe in the toxic waters just going to say, eloquence aside, I kind of understand what Quality meant… maybe.

But let me preface this by saying I think how you interpreted the post has to do with your headspace in your career/project at the time of reading it, or where your natural talents, skills and passions lay.

This is to say many looked at this as “Oh he just wants to shoot some scenes and learn and share” – even though OP never mentioned anything about learning or practicing whatsoever. In fact one could deduce it was meant to be taken at face value, more like "I am starting a channel that regurgitates scenes from famous movies because I think people will find that entertaining and this will be what makes me a filmmaker." - That's not an incorrect interpretation.

What I believe this comes down to, the reactions here, is that there are filmmakers who want to learn the craft and nerd out on gear and then be there ready to rock when some good original content comes their way. We need these people.

There are also those who are rooted more in the creative. I started out playing cover songs and couldn’t wait to play out with my own material, yet there are guys right now, killer technical musicians running circles around me, looking to get into a cover band to make some weekend money. The guys I know like this don’t write. They either don’t care to or can’t, not in their DNA. Now, if you are looking at this post as what I’ll call a creative, you can’t help but wish that someone going through all that effort (I’m growing faint thinking of the pre, the prod and the post on something like this, especially something episodic) would pump it into some original material, any more than you wish there wasn’t a Transformers 13 or a Blair Witch reboot. It's not an unnatural desire.

I suppose the difference for me is, when I see something like this and feel like the later, I’d rather not comment at all. More power to them, and less competition in my already overcrowded lane.

But again, if you are looking at this from a cutting your teeth perspective and becoming a tradesman, it doesn’t seem like a bad idea at all. As long as OP is aware that there are already dozens of highly watched channels that recreate specific events in films to show would be filmmakers “how’d they do that”. But again OP never said this was his intention.

One thing I'll say to Quality directly is that we have to also consider, per my diatribe here, that OP hasn't the ability to make something original. This is normal, hell it’s common. Content is king and there is a severe shortage, always. And that’s OK and maybe it's hard to respond "I'm not good at that" - even though there's no shame, especially if they bring something else of value to the table.

We definitely need people in the field that represent each side of the brain. It’s crucial. But make no mistake, in my experience the existence of and distinction between the two sides is a reality. And I truly think that is what is at play here… what lens are you viewing the original post through? There are people that want to play what John Lennon played. There are people that want to play like John Lennon. And there are people that want to write like John Lennon. All equally necessary cogs in the machine but man are they all wired differently.

There is however one really ugly aspect of this that isn't PC to discuss, and that is people who confidently claim a side of the brain that they really shouldn't. Beware. Remember that guy i told you who flat out says he can't write? He is a god among men when compared to the guy who says he can write... and really really can't.

Oh, there is a mutant species known as the Auteur that is cursed to roam both sides of the brain for all eternity. They are doomed to burn in a pit of perfectionism, control and hellfire. I wouldn't wish their plight on my worst enemy.

My concluding thought is that learning filmmaking by putting effort and resources into a scene from let’s say an original screenplay, perhaps one from members of this forum, wouldn’t deter the learning experience in the least, and ain’t a half bad idea if someone really has the drive to dive into this... and clearly states that is their intention.

Anyway, mostly just fascinated by the reactions, especially in the wake of OP not mentioning wanting to learn anything at all. Interesting right?
 
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