tv What are the most Boring TV shows you've ever watched?

i played poker once with Jerry Van Dyke (my brush with greatness, lol). I always found him to be an engaging actor, with a unique certain kind of comic presence, beginning with his bits on the Dick Van Dyke show, as Rob's brother. And I liked Coach too, because he was in It.
I hung out with Robert Wuhl (Arli$$) once. He was kind of depressed, doing local standup gigs in SF years after his series was over.
 
From the era of My mother the car I remember a kind of golden age: The Munsters, the far superior Adams Family, and Batman, the full camp of which I fully got, even as a little kid.
Of course I watched all those shows, since back then there were only 2 channels and a fuzzy channel that only came through during clear sky days. Gilligan's island and Perry Mason were the two most professional looking shows on tv at the time.

Still, in terms of 60s and 70's reruns, I think people tend to overlook some of the greats such as "ultraman" , "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea", and "Get Smart"



 
I got drunk once with Zalman Yanovsky, lead guitar for the Lovin Spoonful (Hot town, summer in the city, back of my neck getting dirty and gritty; and this cool lyric: All around, people looking half dead, walking on the sidewalk, hotter than a match head). Although it might even have been John Sebastian. It was one of those two guys, after their gig in a little casino bar in Tunica Mississippi (where I also saw, with seven people, what might have been the last performance of Tiny Tim.)
 
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Yup. Loved get smart. And I never can forget this Mad Magazine parody, because I thought the title was hilarious: Voyage to See What's on the Bottom. Also: Time Tunnel!
 
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Yeah, Time Tunnel was pretty great in it's own way. I used to read MAD magazine when I was a kid. I liked Spy vs. Spy a lot, and played the video game they made out of it for a decent stretch back when the world looked like an episode of Stranger Things. For some reason, I will never forget that Commodore 64 with the keys that were "much easier to press than the ones on the TRS-80"
 
Of course I watched all those shows, since back then there were only 2 channels and a fuzzy channel that only came through during clear sky days. Gilligan's island and Perry Mason were the two most professional looking shows on tv at the time.
yup. I remember being thrilled to discover there were a few channels above 13. But, as I remember, they somehow involved a coat hanger. And i do watch a perry mason once in a while on Amazon. They are still pretty good .
 
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I always liked Steven King, he is a zero bullshit person, who just tries his best and works hard. It's not all Shakespeare, but his writing entertained a generation, and there were some real high points where he penned some stuff that was genuinely exceptional.
 

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Anyone remember when NBC made Emeril's coking show into a sitcom????

bam yes GIF
 
I always liked Steven King, he is a zero bullshit person, who just tries his best and works hard. It's not all Shakespeare, but his writing entertained a generation, and there were some real high points where he penned some stuff that was genuinely exceptional.
Yup a pretty cool guy. I remember him saying somewhere that he likes literary fiction, reads literary fiction, but he just can't write it. Also about his experience with a non fiction thing he wrote, about his kids baseball team, for the New Yorker, and about how much he loved working with a world class editor (someone who I imagine had the temerity to tell him, perhaps, to write...less.). Also, I like, in his early books, the fact that if someone had a Bud poundah (16 oz.--I lived in Bangor for a while) he was probably a good guy, and if someone had a bible--probably not so much.
 
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I can imagine SK cowriting The Magic Mountain with Thomas Mann.

"For what is life, if not the expectation of time slipping past us, the dwindling flame of interest vanishing across the gradually blurring decades" Herr Setimbrini quipped as he inspected his dinner plate.

"or perhaps the gradual distancing from the significance of events in our own lives gives us the perspective to see existence in it's true frame"
Replied the doctor.

"Well, I recon it has to do with that old abandoned graveyard, the one where they burned that escaped convict alive after he murdered those kids" Said the old man, his glass eye fixed on a distant object, too horrifying to bother describing.
 
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