Should I get a new camera?

My dad wanted a DSLR for his birthday, so I was going to give him my Canon T2i, since maybe I should get a new camera in the future anyway. I would save more money doing that, than buying him another camera, then buying a whole new one for myself.

But I was thinking, perhaps it's better just to use money in the future to higher DPs, instead of get my own new one. Right now in filmmaking, it seems that people rely on me to have my own equipment too much, rather than just use theirs. I got a DP to shoot a short of mine for example, but her car was impounded along with the camera inside, she told me later, and cannot afford to get the car out. And she says we can just use mine instead.

But I figure in the future, my money may be more well spent if I just hire better people who are more reliable on having their own equipment. They know that they cannot allow anything to go wrong, if they want to remain hired for the movie, since I don't have a good enough back up camera, on hand, so maybe the money will be more well spent on better disciplined people. I often have to fill in for an actor anyway, and do not like having to set up the camera, and have it rolling with no one behind it.

Or if I should get my own camera still just in case I need it, I would like to know which is the best for me? Outdoors at night on downtown streets has always been a concern as I may want a camera that is better on noise. I was told the GH3 and perhaps the new GH4 coming out are. The new GH4 I hear has a global shutter too, so no jello effect problems hopefully!

I would also like a camera that can shoot at 60fps and still be at full HD, or perhaps even higher frames per seconds speeds, for slow motion if I want it. I would also like one where I can dial in the color temperature manually, allowing me to choose whichever temperature I want, rather than relying on magic lantern which can be a bit faulty sometimes I find.

I would also like a camera, that can not only take prime lenses but hopefully zoom lenses, with a constant aperture for zooming, and not have it be too expensive. But if that's not an option I can color correct the aperture changes in during the zoom I suppose. I would also like a camera that has a good amount of picture styles to choose from to give better cinematic looks.

I guess that's it for all I want in a new camera. If I think of more features I will add them in. Any ideas what camera could best suit these low budget needs? Another thing is camera technology is changing so much now, compared to audio technology. You can use the same field recorder for years and people will think it's good, but with cameras, it seems that everyone wanted HD when it came out over SD, and now 4K is coming, so maybe a GH3 will be considered sub-par in two years. I would like a camera, hopefully good enough that I would not have to update again for at least 8 years if I am to buy another one, as oppose to relying on a DP.

Thanks.
 
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Simply putting out casting calls isn't trying. That's minimal effort, if any at all, especially since you were just recently here complaining that you couldn't manage to find a location to hold auditions.

1) You have to sell a project with confidence. If you aren't confident and excited about it, why would anyone else be? If you're nervous and wary, you aren't going to inspire others to jump on board.

2) You need to assess your resources and work within them. I suggested a few weeks ago that you try shooting an experimental short film with no actors. I even gave you a link to a great example. You said you'd do it, and now here we are. Why? And if you can't get 10 actors but you can get two, write a story for two. Until you have something demonstrable to show for other casting calls, good luck finding folks to accomplish larger projects. And until you have a reputation for getting projects finished, you'll have very limited resources.

3) People don't wait around for no-pay indie work. You need to look at a short time period. Within a week, you should be shooting. These are no-budget, indie shorts. Much of the pre-production can be done on paper and over the phone before you have your cast in place. But the longer you delay the shoot dates, the more likely folks are going to walk away. And why shouldn't they? You don't have anything to show them that indicates your abilities. You're a gamble. You may find folks who will be willing to help at first, but when something better comes along, they'll take it. If you start shooting, the commitment is more real.

You've also had a thread discussing the qualities of a leader on-set. I haven't worked with you on anything, but I do know that people don't walk away from a competent and energetic leader. The number of times you have complained about people quitting on you make me wonder what it is about your ability to interact with people that may be an issue. Based on your posts, you're always full of excuses about why things aren't your fault. If that carries over to your on-set interactions, that's part of the problem.

You need to spend a good deal of time reading back over your post history here. As you do, ask yourself, "How does this reflect on me?"

I've handed you enough fish. You need to go catch some yourself.
 
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Okay thanks. I haven't done that short with no actors yet, cause I have been trying to arrange one with two actors for the past few months but has been tough and constantly recasting. One of the problems is, is that when I put out the casting call, it takes more than a week for most people to respond. So I will tell an actor that he or she is hired, but then I have to wait on the other one.

This also goes for waiting on PSMs to respond as well. Everyone is waiting on someone else to respond to the add and be cast. I need to find a way to get the adds noticed a lot quicker and get more responses in fast. Especially if I am too shoot a week after posting the call. Are their any better websites that people check into more where they will respond faster? I will look.

Most of my communications with people has been through emails and texts though so maybe I do not show enough excitement in my messages about wanting to make it. When I meet people I also try to keep things business like to appear professional, but perhaps this has been a downfall, and I shoot act a lot more excited.

I posted that short a few months ago, that was just a series of city shots. I could do more like that in the mean time with no actors, if that counts as a proper short.
 
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No I haven't tried Skype yet. What I mean is, is that they take more than a week usually to respond to the add. Then we make an audition date, or try to. But even so, not everyone comes to the same audition date, and in a script with two actors, one has to wait on the other, and then one looses interests, and it happens over and over. I will try Skype, thanks for the suggestion. Never used it before so I will try!
 
Harmonica

Did you even read my post on here...I was encouraging you mate...

A year ago I tried to get a crew together to help me film something...nobody came...so I got my tripod and my crappy camera ( it filmed in letterbox mode ) and I went out and filmed myself in character as part of a movie. I was surprised by how quickly the story actually started coming together. I then came home and edited it, and threw a sound track over the top. The footage in letterbox mode was terrible, but the story itself was good, the shots were right for what I was doing.

There is no can't.
 
Well I am trying to figure out why no one wants to act in the shorts or anything. You say the problem is me, and therefore I am trying to figure out, what about me is the problem. Is that not what I am suppose to be doing? And I don't refuse to try. I have been trying for months to assemble cast and crews for shorts, and posted hundreds of casting calls here and there. I get responses, but no one has stuck it through to the shoot dates. I naturally thought maybe it's the scripts. What makes you think I am afraid to try. I have tried several times, I am perfectly willing. Sure I do tests, but I also help people with their projects, and I have gone out and met several people who have responded to my casting calls.


I may be able to help you if you can answer just a few short questions. I promise I am not going to ridicule you so please be as honest as you can.

1: How old are you?

2: How are you describing your film to these would be helpers? Walk me through the discussions or emails had, and what was said.

3: Do you try to be very formal, or very laid back when talking to prospective crew and actors?

4: Let me see the advert you are placing to find these people.

5: How are you describing your film to them? Describe it to me even if in a private message, although I promise I will keep it confidential.


If you can answer these questions, I am confident that I will be able to help you design a way to approach people that will get them to stay.
 
Seeing as this is a camera post...I have a question regarding the Canon 500d vs the Canon 650d

( 650d is the 700d for less money minus two exterior features that are unimportant. All the specs are the same so I don't look at the 700d )

I am tempted to go for the 500d.

I want to do some night shots, but mostly day shots. The 500d achieves this at what is now a stunningly low cost. However we have the night shots to consider, so iso settings are important.

The 650d achieves a higher iso rating so in theory it will handle night shots better but I know that about 3 quarters up the iso range it becomes pointless to be able to go any higher as I would still get grain.

The 650d films at a better frame rate, whereas the 500d has to step down into 720 definition to achieve high deff at 24 fps ( I think that's right )

I also know that adequate lighting will be required for night shots to avoid grain even if using the best camera on the planet.

My question is basically, would the 650d shoot noticeably better footage in day and night? or is it so little a difference that I am better to go for the 500d based on price and quality of footage?

I have looked at youtube footage and great results have been achieved with both cameras but I know that results vary based on skill, technique, knowledge etc of the individual shooter so I need the basic answer once the unimportant tech specs and videos are ignored.
 
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Harmonica

Did you even read my post on here...I was encouraging you mate...

A year ago I tried to get a crew together to help me film something...nobody came...so I got my tripod and my crappy camera ( it filmed in letterbox mode ) and I went out and filmed myself in character as part of a movie. I was surprised by how quickly the story actually started coming together. I then came home and edited it, and threw a sound track over the top. The footage in letterbox mode was terrible, but the story itself was good, the shots were right for what I was doing.

There is no can't.

Yep I read it. Just wasn't sure how to respond and it gave me a lot of thinking to do. I will do it and go in different directions.
 
A little off-topic, but:

why don't you copy-paste your last casting call here?
I'm really curious how you communicate.

Some other questions:

What do you do when 1 actor responds (s)he wants to work on your project, but you still need a second one?

Do you save all the contactinfo of people who ever responded to your castings?


I admit I only make very short shorts, because I have to run my own business as well (luckily a video production company doing corporate videos), but usually it's done (including editing) within 3 or 4 weeks from the moment I start casting.
When you cast you need to have a plan, which means:
a script, location and a shooting date (or 2 or 3 options).
My castings look something like this (but a bit more elaborate):

BLABLA wanted for short film on (date(s)) in (area)

I'm Walter, filmmaker, you can see my portfolio here: URL
For my next shortfilm I'm looking for BLABLA.
The story is about: this and that (not the whole script! i.e. for 'The Egg' in 2010:
we're going to make a short easter video. It will be a fake movie-trailer with references to The Matrix, Tombraider and Easter.)
The plan is to shoot on this and that day from ... till ... in this area.
We arranged we can film at COOL LOCATION (only say this when it's important or cool)
The budget is close to zero, but of course we'll pay your travel expenses as long as you don't come flying ;) (The Netherlands is small, so flying is never an option to get anywhere in side the nation)
If you have time and want to join this project I'd love to hear from you.
It will be fun!

(Not precisely like this, but just to give you an idea.)
 
Canon EOS Rebel T3i 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera and DIGIC 4 Imaging with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens, Very nice Camera DSLR.

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You say the problem is me, and therefore I am trying to figure out, what about me is the problem.

A). No one wants to be asked for advice, spend the time giving you the advice and see you completely ignore the advice and fubar it up.

B). No one enjoys being around with someone who cannot do even the simplest of things. If you cannot do simple things, why do you think anyone would believe you could pull off a full production.

C). If you're the leader and you come across as someone who doesn't respect people enough to respond to their questions, you're the asshole, not them. I'm assuming in real life you do the same as you do on this forum. If people show an interest in helping/working with you, it's very disrespectful and unprofessional if you fail to respond.

D). No one wants to be around a disaster. If "sh*t" always happens to you, who do you think wants to get tangled up in that?

E). Excuses are for losers. No one wants to associate with losers. You need to shift your thought patterns to more of a solutions based method. While there aren't always perfect solutions for every problem, an ordinary solution is always better than waiting for a problem to fix itself.

I haven't done that short with no actors yet, cause I have been trying to arrange one with two actors for the past few months but has been tough and constantly recasting. One of the problems is, is that when I put out the casting call, it takes more than a week for most people to respond. So I will tell an actor that he or she is hired, but then I have to wait on the other one.

Excuses, excuses. CALL THEM. If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got. I assume you're a smart person. You kept the details of the cast and crew of productions you've helped with. Call/email/sms/stalk them. Do whatever it takes to get your film done. Who cares if they say no? There's always another cast/crew member you can call.

You have a choice. Leave your future in the hands of others, or you can take control of your own life. Hell, it doesn't bother me if you can only afford to eat cat food for the rest of your life. The future is for those who reach out and make it happen.

I suggest you go out and do some pop self help courses. They'll really help you. Anthony Robbins would be me pick for you.
 
My last casting call was:

Cast and crew wanted for local short film.

"It's a 2 page short film script, that I plan on shooting in two days over the weekend, in late January.

The two characters are a man and woman couple in their 20s-30s.

It is a non-payed project where everyone can work on their craft, but you will be wined and dined throughout the shoot, and not to mention a thank you dinner afterwards!

Thank you for your interest!"

That's how I worded my last add.
 
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I talked to an actress I worked with before who moved to Vancouver a few years ago. Apparently she gets parts in short films every 1-3 months. 1-3 months! It's no wonder a lot of people move out there, as there obviously is a lot of opportunity. I would have thought it would be difficult to make connection in Vancouver, cause of all the competition. But that's why there is a lot of filmmakers and actors their to work with.

I'm going to move out there. An opportunity every 1-3 months, is a lot better than where I live, where you are lucky to find one year. That is just ridiculous in comparison. Plus with that many filmmakers and actors out there, I can find people to work with a lot easier. I was told by people where I live, that our culture has no sense of art, and that is probably partially the problem. I am moving out there, or somewhere better, much to my fiance's disagreement, but I will do it, and not let anything hold me back.
 
Stop thinking you have to move. Stop worrying about getting a new camera. Stop holding auditions. Stop looking for cinematographers, or PSMs, or whatever it is you think you need. Grab two friends and your camera and go make a short film this weekend. And I mean make a film - start to finish, get it done, using only whatever you've got available to you right now. It's going to suck - that's fine. Then watch it over and over, thinking about what you could have done differently (with all the same resources) to improve it. Then do it again next month, and the month after that. Do that for a year. I guarantee you'll be 100x better by this time next year if you do that - and you don't have to move away to do it, or spend any money, or anything.

This is what you should have been doing all along, but as they say it's never to late to be what you might have been....
 
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