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Kickstarter Hangups...

One problem could be location.
The film is being shot in Chicago
but the project is in Omaha.
The initial project was in Chicago,
but the revision is where I am currently.
I am in position one in Omaha.
I was in the 70's in Chicago.

At this point I would welcome any help.
Next time...

... write for the locations you have free and ready LOCAL access to, like in your own town in the homes and on the land of willing participants, public places and parks.

Next time. ;)
 
The videointerview needs rewriting: you're not making want people see and fund the project with it, because you're not telling what it's about.
"We have a script about something that really happened" isn't really selling your project. (At least not to me.)

I may sound a bit harsh now, but at this moment you can still do something about it.

Crowdfunding is about 2 things:
- having fans with money or people who own you a favor
- selling your project to (This means you really have to get people interested and excited.)

Good thing about crowdfunding is that you don't have only 1 or 2 persons you can possibly sell the project to. (So you only have a few shots to succeed.)
The bad thing is you have to sell it to a lot of people. (You need a lot of shots to hit enough people.)
 

mlesemann

Staff Member
Moderator
In general, I contribute to projects by people who I know, especially those who have helped me in some way (usually NOT monetarily) over the years. I've contributed to some projects where I "know" the person through a board like this one - not because they post once or twice, but are regulars and I see them helping other people.

Sometimes I'm interested in the subject, but sometimes I'm not...it's more the person than the subject, although it does help if it doesn't seem the same as the last 20 pitches that I've seen.
 
Next time...

... write for the locations you have free and ready LOCAL access to, like in your own town in the homes and on the land of willing participants, public places and parks.

Next time. ;)

I have film crew in both states. The last film I was in was Chicago. That is where we are shooting project one. We have all of the locations scouted. We also have the actors lined up.

Project two is going to shot in Lincoln. Everything is set up for it also. Locations, actors, etc.

We are having to build our own sets, however. I have crew with construction experience. They will work for free but the materials are not free.
 
The videointerview needs rewriting: you're not making want people see and fund the project with it, because you're not telling what it's about.
"We have a script about something that really happened" isn't really selling your project. (At least not to me.)

I may sound a bit harsh now, but at this moment you can still do something about it.

Crowdfunding is about 2 things:
- having fans with money or people who own you a favor
- selling your project to (This means you really have to get people interested and excited.)

Good thing about crowdfunding is that you don't have only 1 or 2 persons you can possibly sell the project to. (So you only have a few shots to succeed.)
The bad thing is you have to sell it to a lot of people. (You need a lot of shots to hit enough people.)

Thanks Walter. I will have a go at a rewrite. Will let you guys know when it is up.
 
I donate to one or two projects per month, but not often film related.

I have only ever "known" one person that I've donated to.

Assuming your project isn't one that randomly catches fire, you have to do a few things to be successful.


1) Have a solid video. If you're doing a film project that is a higher bar.
2) Have something to show. Have a sizzle reel, a few scenes, a mocked-up trailer, something.
3) Don't whine. You should never act like a loser and I don't want to hear that the project won't happen without my help.
4) Have an interaction plan. You are raising funds in a direct relationship, think of a way to involve the funders.

Most important -

5) Have an audience. Most of the campaigns I donate to have provided a service. They have put out a regular podcast, e-books, videos, etc. They have provided a value that people are willing to support. This can be a new product or simply digital patronage.

There is a group that does the internet equivalent of improv radio dramas that have entertained me immensely on long drives and night shifts. I'm more than happy to throw money at them. They typically run a 4 or so campaigns per yer and raise 4-5k consistently from 50 backers or so. They have a fairly large audience and a core group of loyal supporters.

The video games that raise funds on there tend to have a functioning demo / beta when they launch.

Authors will have other pieces of work.

You need to have the mindset that the first one is always free. Works for a variety of business ventures.
 
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The New video is up. Only had access to my son's handicam and the editing software that came with it. It should be a more entertaining romp than before. There is still some room for improvement, but it is much better than the old one.
 
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Watched the old video yesterday - this one is definitely better. It feels like it's out of order though. You have 40 seconds of not much going on right at the beginning - a lot of people will tune out here. Then you have a longish explanation of what the story is without much intro to the project, and at 2:20 you finally get into your real hook - I'll bet most people have tuned out by this point. I'd say open with the tank line, then go straight into your visual sequence, then explain the story and finish with what you need the money for.
 
Like ItDonnedOnMe said: much better!
The order needs some work indeed to grap that attention and motivate people to donate.
But I think you have the content you need, now you need a re-edit.

Try and look what works best:
tank--motion graphics--story from around 1:54--the rest
tank--story from 1:54--motion graphics-- the rest

or:
Why shoud you donate title-- "We have a tank! A freaking tank" -- the story title -- the story from 1:54 -- we have a tank title -- "And if that's not enough to make you donate: we also have..." -- the rest.
(make the tank a thing that comes back)
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
One problem could be location. The film is being shot in Chicago but the project is in Omaha.
People who believe in you, personally, will not have a problem donating
a few bucks to you. Over 1,300 "Likes" yet those people will not even
donate one dollar.

I wonder if the problem could be the perks you offer. I sure won't donate
the $50 perk - being an extra in your movie is not an incentive to someone
like me. You cut off anyone not living in the immediate area - that includes
the $100 perk. If you are relying on people who wish to be on screen then
location is the problem.

Do you know why those 1,300 people hit "like"? Because they like you,
some member of the cast or you personally? Or because it's kind of an "in"
thing to do - "like" random pages?

And what's up with your $500 perk? Let's say you get one person who
wants a speaking role to give you $100 and one more person who wants
to be an extra to give you $50 each; now you have $200. Then someone
give you $500 to make a different film and wants THEIR friends in their
movie not your cast and they don't need extras.

Your entire campaign comes off as scattered and not thought through.
Makes me wonder if that's how you will run the production I donate to.
Not putting you down - just a personal observation. I hope I'm wrong and
when I check on July 2 you have all the money you need!

But I seriously wonder (as zensteve does) why you can't motivate the
people who already "like" your project to pony up one dollar each. Hell,
even 8% of them dropping $5 would make your current number.
 
I can see your point about it being more local access than global. I was initially hoping to make a community type project. That may have been a bit short sighted.

The roles in a Lyncredible production reached beyond the first Lyncredible film. We have another couple episodes scripted. We also have another project we are working with another crew.

The movie making part was going to use our crew and a possibly some of our actors, but it was more geared toward making some person's dream a reality.

The perks were designed to be awarded over the span of at least two short films, but possibly more. The Movie award was never supposed to be linked to anything else. It is basically us taking a finished or partially finished script and fleshing it out enough to be produced.

Truthfully, this forum and this thread have been a godsend for me. I am so thankful that you guys are here to help.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
I can see your point about it being more local access than global. I was initially hoping to make a community type project. That may have been a bit short sighted.
I don't think it's short sighted at all. You only need $500. Your local
community should be able to come up with that to show their support.
The reality is most people who donate will know you and believe in you.
Those are the people you should be going after, especially since you
need so little money.
 
$190 raised out of $500 with 5.5 days to go. The amount is small enough to give me hope, but time is quickly becoming an issue.
 
I know how tough it is getting your project going. I kicked you a few bucks to try and help out, good luck! I'm sure you'll get there :yes:
 
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