Film effect beyond your basic color correction and frame rate.

This may not be groundbreaking to some of you, but

I was watching some movies and I’ve noticed something…Most of the shots are slightly movable(?) I always thought that most shots are shot on a tripod or some other kind of pod, but I noticed that even at times when it seems like they are using one, if you look at your screen edge and pick a point on the picture, you’ll see that the camera moves during the shot……

This is minute movement I am talking about… up/down, left/right, diagonally and so on.

I suppose they use some kind of steady cam on most shots, or a fig rig. I did test shoot yesterday……same shot, same lighting, same color correction and so on. One on a tripod, one is handheld on a rig. Second
shoot really gave off a more film like movement.

Anyone else also notice this?
 

chilipie

Pro Member
indiePRO
You're probably seeing some reframing while shooting on a tripod, or the handheld work of an experienced camera operator. The use of a Steadicam certainly isn't normal practice, and it gives a very different look from handheld. A fig rig would be impossibly unwieldy and require superhuman strength with a 35mm camera - part of their function is to add that "big rig" feel to prosumer cameras.

It's important to note here that the main difference between handheld operating with consumer and professional cameras is weight - larger cameras have so much inertia that it's physically impossible for the operator to make them as shaky as a handycam. Add to this more points of contact (two handles, shoulder rest and eyepiece), and you can see why your "film look" handheld is very different from home video.
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYE3CZMEfVU

I think this effect is commonly achieved through dolly movements, like it is in this example. Camera motion tends to give more energy to a scene, similar to a higher average shot length.

I feel this effect may be overused, however, much like color grading is overused. I believe that camera movements should be motivated.
 
Most camera movement involves a dolly of some sort. There are lots of ways to achieve movement though. Track and dollies, carts, sliders, jibs, cranes, basic pans, steady cams/stabilizers and good 'ol traditional handheld and more. Part of the art is figuring out which technique is best and fits the scene best.

Some people think that eveypry shot needs some sort of movement, others think hardly any do. Personally I think a slight dolly left or right adds tons of class to a ordinary shot. Maybe a slight push in. Makes a long scene easier to watch.
 
You can also use the camera and projector function to move around in your image to give the impression of movement on a video shot on a tripod. You can even give it a little judder to simulate steady handheld. I think that is what you are seeing. I have noticed it myself in movies. All you need is a small amount of movement and you will give the shot some additional appeal IMO. Im learning to use it a bit in my work

The below was all shot using a tripod with no camera movement or zooming using the lens zoom. The below is a somewhat extreme example. The "movement" was mostly zooming in, but a pan R or L can be done the same way with or without zooming in or out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMZpGXVFInY
 
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You can also use the camera and projector function to move around in your image to give the impression of movement on a video shot on a tripod. You can even give it a little judder to simulate steady handheld. I think that is what you are seeing. I have noticed it myself in movies. All you need is a small amount of movement and you will give the shot some additional appeal IMO. Im learning to use it a bit in my work

The below was all shot using a tripod with no camera movement or zooming using the lens zoom. The below is a somewhat extreme example. The "movement" was mostly zooming in, but a pan R or L can be done the same way with or without zooming in or out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMZpGXVFInY

Disturbing!
 
That's pretty cool. I like the slower moves as they look more dolly than zoom. It seems like camera movement is all the rage today, although I'm more of a fan of classic movement instead of the frenetic "The Office" version.
 
I'd have to see an example to know what you're talking about, cuz as a few others have mentioned, every filmmaker/DP/whatever has a different style, often times you'll see different styles in different scenes from the same movie, etc. So, I don't know what kind of camera movement you're talking about. It could be a really slow dolly and/or jib. It could be handheld or steadicam. Those would be my first two guesses. In Hollywood, I don't see a great deal of panning/tilting on a tripod.
 
Indiebudget, your example video gave me nightmares.

Thanxxx, It is just a taste from a feature Im working on.. gonna get creepy, I'm still working on it. Next I want to film a scene with the gal putting a little body wrapped in cloth into a creek. want to make sure we do not have any cops watching us.

Speaking of movement, I might even put a waterproof cam on something and let it float down the creek and get her reactions.

I love this thread as it is reminding me of how important it is to have even subtle camera movement that adds to the mood in one's work. Just a little to give it some life, not too much to be a distracton. I think I can make that happen in editing. The above video shows some drastic examples of cam movement. I want to use some slower pans along with some fluxuations to give it a smooth, sometimes handheld look.





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