cheapest dv camera with 24p?

Hi everyone. I am looking into buying a dv camera, but I would really like to get one that has the 24p function for the more filmlike look. Can anyone tell me a couple of the cheaper dv cameras that has this function?
 
two things;

1) the cheapest 24p camera probabably won't give you a wide dynamic range, which may be more important than 24p for a film look

2) with the growing market of HDV and HD prosumer camcorders, a lot of people must be selling their used DVX-100s ... if not now, then soon.
 
Sorry guys. I presumed that everyone knows about the Panasonic DVX-100 and this guy was looking for something less expensive. I agree that the DVX-100 is a great choice. I have one sitting her next to me, but I don't think of it as an inexpensive camera; especially when you add much needed accessories, like the anamorphic lens adaptor.

Some random thoughts/suggestions ;

You could record in 480p using an inexpensive HDV camcorder and do the 3:2 pulldown in software.
You could also record with a 1080i HDV camcorder like Canon's new HD toy the HD10 and use only one of the 2 fields to get 540 lines of effective resolution, with no interlacing.

There are lots of ways to get to 24p, but dynamic range, lens quality, and creative control (e.g. manual focus, manual exposure, manual white balance, cine gamma) mean a lot more to the final "look" than 24 frames per second. These are all things the DVX-100 does well, and it's very nice to work with, in my opinion. (also, the DVX has XLR inputs for professional audio equipment ... don't forget audio!)
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
There are lots of ways to get to 24p, but dynamic range, lens quality, and creative control (e.g. manual focus, manual exposure, manual white balance, cine gamma) mean a lot more to the final "look" than 24 frames per second. These are all things the DVX-100 does well, and it's very nice to work with, in my opinion. (also, the DVX has XLR inputs for professional audio equipment ... don't forget audio!)
This has been my mantra for years! I'm glad to see someone else say it.

24p won't give you a "film" look. It can't hurt, but it isn't the final solution to getting a great picture on DV. Even though my JVC HD100U shoots 24p I don't use it.
 
I've got to agree with the two postings above.

I just invested in a Sony DCR-VX9000 mainly because it gave me a camera that shoulder mounts and has full manual control.

For me the fact that the camera shoulder mounts was at least as important as the high degree of manual control.

I think the point that we're all making is that 24p is way down the list of key features to get a great looking film -- manual control is far more important and perhaps the key question is really -- How will I be using this camera?

Knowing that I was going to want a lot of Hand Held shots for my next project, I prioritized a camera that would perform best in that environment.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
To answer your question, I tried some searching, and I don't see a cheaper one than the Panasonic mentioned.
 
Well thanks for all the replys. I do realize you have to do alot more than just have 24p to get a film look. But I think what I am going to do is get a camera, an just use software like maybe dvfilm maker to get the 24p. I didn't think the 24p would help with lighting and whatnot, I just would prefer to have the smoother filmlike movement the 24p "i think" would help with, at least some.

To be honest, I'm a very big fan of digital, but it certainly has its advantages, and those advantages are the reason I want to use it for certain projects. I don't always have enough money for film, and especially when I will want to do bigger projects than only 10 minutes long, dv will probably be essential for that. And its great for spontanious filming, and I will need it alot for that.
 
The only way to get the "real" motion blur that you see on the big screen is to shoot with a shutter of 1/48th sec. Anything else is going to be trying to replicate that. The 24p is fast becoming something that people go for to get that "cinematic" look when it's really perhaps the smallest part of the puzzle. The good part is that it's cheap now. Many cameras support it natively.
 
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