camera-dept Can't make a decision... please help

Hi everyone, I'm looking to jump in more seriously to video, and I'm starting shooting event videography so I'm selling my Canon 4000d (which just will not handle filming indoors at all I find) I however don't have a huge amount to spend but I am completely stuck between 3 options which are (in order of cheapest to most expensive) the:

Canon 77D (pro: cheapest)
Canon 250D (pro: 4K capable)
Canon 80D (pro: weatherproof)

There seems to be little difference between the 77D and 250D from what I can see (except 250D has 4K ability but its advised to still shoot 1080p for best results) and the 250D is only slightly more expensive than the 77D.

I have seen the 80D heavily recommend in old discussions (2017 or earlier) and there are lots of examples of films on youtube shot on the 80D but it is a much older model now and still a few hundred more expensive yet the comparisons I have watched it doesn't seem that much different from the 77D or 250D.

The pros I added next to each one seem to be the main difference I can find.

It almost feels like I'm trying to pick between almost identical cameras just with different release dates, size/weight comparisons, and price points and I just can't settle on one.

Is there anything I'm overlooking that makes one better than the others before I take the plunge?
Are any of them better in low light? (as grain and flickering is the issue I suffer from the 4000d)


For extra added info the lenses I have are:
* 25mm f/1.8
* 55mm f/1.8
* 18-55mm f/2.8
* 55-200mm f/4-5.6
* 35-80mm f/4-5.6
(I'd prefer to stick with DSLR so I can use the EF-S mount lenses over switching to mirrorless.)
 
If the ability to use your existing lenses is the primary concern, check out used offerings from Blackmagic Design. Many of their cameras have Super 35 sensors with EF(s) mounts. Also consider that you can get adapters to use EF(s) lenses on crop sensor cameras from Sony, Panasonic, etc. Viltrox makes a cheaper version of the Speed Booster for EF to MFT that retains the electronic control of the lenses while giving you a FOV and speed advantage. The Panasonic Lumix GH5 is considered the best of the relatively inexpensive DSLRs for filmmaking. If you are getting serious about video, I recommend purchasing a camera designed and intended for video. If 4K isn't a concern, the Canon XL1(s) or XL2 might be of interest to you. I don't know what your budget is, so I can only make general recommendations.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
It almost feels like I'm trying to pick between almost identical cameras just with different release dates, size/weight comparisons, and price points and I just can't settle on one.
That's exactly what you are doing - picking between almost identical
cameras. So my advice will not help you:

You will be happy with any of them so get the one you can afford. At no
point will you regret not getting the other camera.
 
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