Are PCs really that bad for movie making?

That's what some have said on here. I was thinking of getting a PC as my next computer. I like it better than mac, cause it's much easier for me to organize everything on. But is there something really so terrible about it for movie making software?
 
That's what some have said on here. I was thinking of getting a PC as my next computer. I like it better than mac, cause it's much easier for me to organize everything on. But is there something really so terrible about it for movie making software?

You got some bad or old info, I have both. Apple disciples will finally admit they haven't used a PC since 1998. :cool:
 
Out of curiosity, how is it easier for you to organize things on a Windows system? I've used all manner of Windows and Linux systems, but OS X still wins hands-down from a usability standpoint.
 
Out of curiosity, how is it easier for you to organize things on a Windows system? I've used all manner of Windows and Linux systems, but OS X still wins hands-down from a usability standpoint.

I'll jump in if nobody minds. Windows 7's search function actually works as opposed to (still have snow kitty) Apple's "give me a keyword and I'll give you 263 files" to meander through.

Windows 7 when was released a long while ago: OS X was very late. I'm already very used to the former. Windows can accept most things Apple (thinking Adobe), Apple can't do that. What was groovy and unique is now antiquated.

Still, my MacBook Pro is my reliable tool in the field.
 
Are PCs really that bad for movie making?
When it comes to video, you want to speak the same language as everyone else. For example if you need someone to online your edit you'd be hard pressed to find someone who works with Final Cut Pro on a PC. Also if you need someone to do some After Effects work you don't want to change platforms (MAC to PC or PC to MAC) or you'll run into gamma correction issues.

When it comes to AUDIO you're OK on a PC. Wave file exports work fine on MAC.
 
I use windows and i have had no issues. But reguardless! you should not be storing video and photo files on any mac or pc. Use an external HD that has 7200rpm. This way you can customize your database and also wont have that much to search thru, compared to what on the actual Mac or PC.
 
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When it comes to video, you want to speak the same language as everyone else. For example if you need someone to online your edit you'd be hard pressed to find someone who works with Final Cut Pro on a PC. Also if you need someone to do some After Effects work you don't want to change platforms (MAC to PC or PC to MAC) or you'll run into gamma correction issues.

When it comes to AUDIO you're OK on a PC. Wave file exports work fine on MAC.

No offense, but I was thinking beyond 32 bit 2009. FC pro is a dead format. It served extremely well in it's heyday. Time to speak a new language. ;)
 
I have a Mac and PC side by side. The winner: Mac. I use the PC for surfing the net. Music, films and art, the Mac.

You could get away with a PC, but expect to come back to this forum often to get glitches and conflicts resolved! :)
 
A Mac and a PC are both tools. They are worthless if you give them to a poser, but an amazing editor can cut Avatar in Movie Maker.

I use a PC, and I love it. I run Adobe CS5, 3DS Max, FL Studio... No problems.
It's mainly because I game, and like to cstomize my computer as much as I can too.
Nevertheless, MACs are great too, the toolset is similar, and knowledge you adquire in one plataform will pretty much carry on to the other. Those who say the could work wonders if they had a MacBook Pro, couldn't do anything worth shit in ANY kind of computing plataform.

If you like MACs and you have the money work for it.
If you want to have a bit more power for the same money, go PC.
No one will be able to tell when watching your final product.
 
10 years ago it made a lot more of a difference than it does now. Most software is cross platform these days, and if not, most can convert and read file formats from other systems. It's all a matter of personal preference. Now, a windows box will be cheaper than an apple system (they're both personal computers...the use of "pc" to mean windows system is a sort of pet peeve of mine...but I'm a big geek, so there is that) and a little easier to upgrade (though even that isn't what it was 10 years ago). A mac will offer better stability with less work, but with a little elbow grease a windows system will be as good or better (depending on how you tweak it).

Windows 7 is a perfectly fine OS, though mine has 90% of the whizzy features disabled that make it run more like a mac (personally never liked the interface) and chew up CPU cycles and memory. Of course, if I could, I'd go back to a *nix system (tried a year ago; couldn't get some of the software I needed to run, but it's getting closer)
 
PC's can make a great movie.

Mac's impress clients. When most clients come in and see two large monitors hooked to a Mac Pro, therr's usually a lot of "whoaaa" with a little jaw-dropping. Makes people feel like they're getting way more than they pay for.

But you, on your own personal projects, use whatever you want. Just make sure it has lots of fast harddrive space.
 

Alcove Audio

Business Member
indieBIZ
I've been a Mac guy since the late 80's. At that time a Mac was the only choice, there weren't any music applications for PC. Up until very recently the only serious (read: used by professionals) programs for audio and visual editing were Mac based. More PC programs began to emerge at the turn of the millennium, but professional editing programs and their associated plug-ins are VERY pricey, and having to upgrade cross-platform was correspondingly expensive, so professional facilities stuck with their Macs.

The birth of the internet meant that things had to be cross platform, so the Mac vs. PC debate has become virtually meaningless. Many softwares - like Pro Tools and Avid - are available for both Mac and PC, although there are still Mac or PC specific programs.

I think that what really has come out of the PC vs Mac debate is the realization that, whichever you choose, if you are doing serious visual or audio editing, your box should be a single purpose machine, meaning that you have a computer dedicated to audio or visual editing - no games, no internet, nothing.
 
your box should be a single purpose machine, meaning that you have a computer dedicated to audio or visual editing - no games, no internet, nothing.

agreed. Keep the web off of it. Slows everything down, doesnt matter what firewall you got insitalled on it. plus doesnt distract you.
 
Use what you can best afford and the tools that best meet your needs. I've worked on PC, Mac, Avid, custom linux based editing systems, and various other stuff. In the end it all about the right tool for the job/price.
 
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