Would anyone be interested in helping a young girl fulfill her dreams?

My name is Anna Turner, this morning my father decided he was going to help me start making films to the best of his ability. MY father has no experience in making films :) so I leave it up to the world of artists to help me. I need to know where to get filming equipment, how much that equipment costs, what it does, how many I need etc... the basics from the start really :) much thanks to all who read and my heart to all who help.
 
THX was certainly not his first film... it's technically far too sophisticated to be a first attempt. Still difficult to watch (the short, not the feature)... but it was the 70s and pacing and story expectations were being rewritten by that group of filmakers.

Grab a copy of "Reel Talent" and see how hit and miss it is for the graduate thesis projects from some REALLY famous directors... after years of schooling to get their Master's degree from arguably the most prestigious film program available at that time.
 
When I say film, I mean feature length, not a short.

Added "Reel Talent" to my stack. Thanks for the tip.


And you're so right. Film was different back then in regards to story, timing and even audience sophistication.
 
Honestly I don't have the money to buy a film school in book form. I'm going to do the best I can at getting one of these books and reading it. I'm not trying to make anything as extravagant as George Lucas. I don't even really like the plot in Star Wars !>.< It's not like Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland is when I started liking his films I started with Beetle Juice, A Nightmare Before Christmas and his short films!
 
My favorite book on filmmaking is What they don't teach you in Film School by Camille Landau and Tiare White. I think It's a good book, also how i found out about Dan Mirvish and his film Omaha. It gives you I think 161 strategies I think it is on how to make a movie. I don't know if thats the best book on filmmaking but I definitely like it. You might want to consider reading some scripts or watching some videos on script writing to get the format down.
 
Honestly I don't have the money to buy a film school in book form.

A lot of books will cost you in the range of 10-20$. I've found a couple that were free, and another that was 99 cents. I'm sure you can afford them, right? Grab them from Amazon.com. If a $20 book isn't in your budget (how on earth are you going to feed your crew?), consider going to your state library. The state library doesn't charge an entry fee where I am. You'll probably only find a few at the library, but it's better than none.

For books, I try to read at least one a week. I'd like to read/do a course more than that, but it's not always possible.

It's not like Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland

I personally don't enjoy his films. It doesn't mean that I don't think he's a good filmmaker. In my opinion, anyone who gets into the top 20 highest selling movies deserve both respect and further study. If someone gets multiples up there, pay closer attention.
 
In my opinion, anyone who gets into the top 20 highest selling movies deserve both respect and further study. If someone gets multiples up there, pay closer attention.

That doesn't necessarily make a good film maker, like "The Hobbit An Unexpected Adventure" I find that movie terrible but a lot of people enjoy it. I would bet that no one in the theater read the book other than me and my family. It didn't even seem like the people who made the film read the book! My mom calls it "The Hobbit An Unexpected Failure" It doesn't even resemble J.R.R. Tolkiens 'Hobbit' but a lot of people loved it!
 
Telling that Peter Jackson is not a good filmmaker simply makes me angry . Maybe instead of flame Jackson you could actually learn the actual name of the movie ?

I know everyone is helping you and they will probably explain to me how I'm the biggest hater on the planet earth but seriously stop talking how awesome and great you are and how you'll become the greatest thing on the planet and go and shoot something already ,show it to us and then ask questions , don't just throw random stuff on here so people can keep on telling you for 11 pages that you'll be the next Steven Spielberg.
 
Telling that Peter Jackson is not a good filmmaker simply makes me angry . Maybe instead of flame Jackson you could actually learn the actual name of the movie ?

I know everyone is helping you and they will probably explain to me how I'm the biggest hater on the planet earth but seriously stop talking how awesome and great you are and how you'll become the greatest thing on the planet and go and shoot something already ,show it to us and then ask questions , don't just throw random stuff on here so people can keep on telling you for 11 pages that you'll be the next Steven Spielberg.

I never said any of that! I just got my camera so I guess I will go shoot something!
 
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thanks for the opportunity to say something Iv not said in a long time.. (search the forum for previous examples and for the spirit in which it is intended)

geeze, Kids today! Get off my lawn!

A love this.. too
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSjLiQxEZlM
 
Here's your next step; Lucky was very gracious, and generous, to send you a camera, now we all want you to go out and show us what you can do, K?:yes:
 
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Yes, I did, you quoted him. The two of you have been snarking (in this thread) at each other but you resorted to name calling, which isn't going to accomplish anything. :( Here's your next step; Lucky was very gracious, and generous, to send you a camera, now we all want you to go out and show us what you can do, K?:yes:

Okay :yes: I will I just have to figure out all of the equipment I don't want to miss use anything! :) I'm sooo Thank full that I got a good camera! And for no cost at all!
 
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That doesn't necessarily make a good film maker, like "The Hobbit An Unexpected Adventure" I find that movie terrible but a lot of people enjoy it. I would bet that no one in the theater read the book other than me and my family. It didn't even seem like the people who made the film read the book! My mom calls it "The Hobbit An Unexpected Failure" It doesn't even resemble J.R.R. Tolkiens 'Hobbit' but a lot of people loved it!

I've had this debate multiple times. Not about the Hobbit, about what measuring stick do you use when it comes to a success of a film? Whether it wins Academy Awards? Meh, that's just a function of marketing these days. There are plenty of films made that aren't "For your consideration" that deserve an award. What about public opinion? That's rather subjective, one mans junk is another mans treasure. It doesn't leave us with a lot of options. Well since this is show business, there needs to be a financial slant to it. For instance, can a movie really be good if it bankrupts the filmmaker? While I'm sure this debate hasn't come to a conclusion, and in essence it will also be just a matter of opinion, but I currently truly believe that the financials of a movie is the best measuring stick that we have. It doesn't guarantee that you'll like the movie, but the top 50 selling movies of all time (you should really pay attention to home entertainment market for this too) is where you should pay a lot of attention, especially if you want to be a successful (and rich) filmmaker.


[...]another point. If you learn the rules, you can have a lot of fun when you break those rules to make your masterpiece even better. Filming wise that is. The issue is, you need to know the rules before you can intentionally break them.
 
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My suggestion would be to grab whatever camera you can and simply shoot. If you're really passionate about filmmaking, and still are when you complete high school, look at attending a film school, or getting onto what sets you can.

Everyone and their dog thinks they can make a movie just as good or better than anything in Hollywood. Everyone is an armchair critic. Everyone will sit there and tell you what's wrong with a plot, or a story, or a shot, or whatever, but the thing is none of them actually could do it. At least, not without years of experience and practice. And the same applies to you. The fact that you're interested in filmmaking is great, but it doesn't mean anything until you turn that interest into a passion, and then turn that passion into practice and experience. There's a reason that the top DPs and top Directors are in their 40's, 50's and 60's, and it's not simply because they weren't interested until they were older. It's because you really need to put in the 10,000 practice hours, and observe and learn from others before you can achieve any level of greatness in anything.

One thing you seem to be lacking at the moment is a certain level of maturity. Which is fine, you're 14; that's not to necessarily be expected. But it's hard to be a part of a mature, professional crew if you're not mature yourself.

The biggest thing you can do right now is go out and get a camera and start shooting. Don't expect these to be the best movies ever because they won't. They'll probably be horrible. And if you think they're amazing, show them to people you don't know, post them online and ask for honest opinions - and then take those opinions on board rather than getting defensive.

Making a film is hard, and making a great film is even harder. You need the right combination of everything - lighting, sound, camera, acting, directing, production design etc. etc. etc.

No-one expects you to make the next multi-million dollar blockbuster as your first film and you shouldn't either. A dash of ego can help you in your career, but you don't want an unrealistic ego. You don't want to think you're better than you are. Be realistic about your own limitations, and adjust your expectations. All 12,000 films that submit to Sundance each year think they're going to get in, and be seen by someone and then get a chance to either turn their short into a feature, or have their feature distributed. Guess what? Around 1% of films submitted
even get into the festival, and even less get picked up for distribution.

A dash of humility goes a long way, even if your product is good.

Also, in regards to a film like The Hobbit:
Peter Jackson is a highly successful filmmaker. I haven't seen the film yet myself, so I cannot give you my opinion on the film. However; there will always be people who hate your film. There are people who hate Star Wars, people who hate Indiana Jones, people who hate Lord of the Rings, people who hate Harry Potter, people who hate Twilight etc. etc. etc.
But there are a lot who love them. Just because somebody hates a film, doesn't mean it's necessarily a bad film.
Secondly, I can guarantee you the filmmakers read the book, as I'm sure a lot of those in the cinema had as well. Books are really difficult to make into movies, as each person has a completely different idea of what the book looks like in their head - I'm not a big Harry Potter fan, not because the movies were bad, simply because after my reading of the books, I would've done things very differently. It doesn't mean they're bad films, and the filmmakers themeslves are highly successful, and deserve a large amount of respect and adulation, not matter how bad you think one of their movies is - are you not aspiring to be in their position? To make a movie with a $200mil budget? You'd be wise to look at their process and how they got there, and look at why their films are so successful, regardless of whether you like the movie or not.


The legendary Dick Barth's four rules of Camera Assisting, go as this; and these should be applied to pretty much every single filmmaking job:

-Show up early
-Punch in on time
-Do your job
-Keep your mouth shut

Everyone has an opinion, and most people don't care what your opinion is. Always think before you speak and consider the outcome of what you have to say. Your opinion, and the way you word it can get you into a lot of trouble, without you even realising that you said anything wrong.

For now do as much reading as you can - books, internet, and watch and analyse as many movies as you can - why this shot? why that lighting? why that random sound efffect? Ask youreslf why did the filmmaker make this decision, and analyse films.

And really importantly, listen. Listen to those with more knowledge, and more experience. Listen to those who need to be listened to. And take constructive criticism. Don't instantly get defensive when anyone says anything. You need to be able to take constructive criticism, just in general in life, but especially in filmmaking. ANd you really need to have a tough skin as everyone is a critic, so learn to take criticism, don't get too defensive if you don't have to, and stay humble - no-one likes a big ego, especially if you can't back it up.
 
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Here's a little inspiration:

http://blog.flickr.net/en/2012/12/21/one-photo-a-day/

And his web-site:

http://kylethompsonphotography.com/


He was doing a photo a day. Maybe you can do one video each week? Nothing fancy, even if it's just a shot of your plate while you're eating dinner and you speed it up 20X, or your feet walking across a room. But one video a week will give you 50 a year (we'll give you Xmas and your vacation off :lol: ).

Okay that is funny! How about for now I stick to at least six in 2013 I'll probably make more than that but, I have a very good idea which will be about over seven hours of footage edited to be around ten or twenty minutes long. Thanks for the idea :) I may try it.

Does anyone know any pretty woods in Texas? If you did that'd be lovely and a great help with one of my projects!!!
 
You live in Texas right? You should go location scouting. Just take a walk around your town and you'll notice places that will connect with you of where you want to shoot. Even when taking a ride in a car with your parents you could look out the window and notice things. I carry around my pocket journal and write things such as these down. You could try that, you just have to look around and eventually you'll find a place that will bring to mind a scene or potential shooting spot in the future. You could also maybe create a spot bible of places around your town and what type of scenes would be good to shoot there. You have to try an go out and try things and experiment and more importantly do things for yourself. Go out and look around you'll probably find those woods you need and you can also ask friends or look on google... Probably a national park around maybe.
 
Does anyone know any pretty woods in Texas?

Mahogany is pretty. Cedar is fairly respectable. (Sorry, couldn't help myself)

Try google maps and google earth. Look for areas that have what you're looking for, then use google earth to zoom in and get an idea of whether it's worth a closer inspection.
 
You live in Texas right? You should go location scouting. Just take a walk around your town and you'll notice places that will connect with you of where you want to shoot. Even when taking a ride in a car with your parents you could look out the window and notice things. I carry around my pocket journal and write things such as these down. You could try that, you just have to look around and eventually you'll find a place that will bring to mind a scene or potential shooting spot in the future. You could also maybe create a spot bible of places around your town and what type of scenes would be good to shoot there. You have to try an go out and try things and experiment and more importantly do things for yourself. Go out and look around you'll probably find those woods you need and you can also ask friends or look on google... Probably a national park around maybe.

Thanks so much.
 
Mahogany is pretty. Cedar is fairly respectable. (Sorry, couldn't help myself)

Try google maps and google earth. Look for areas that have what you're looking for, then use google earth to zoom in and get an idea of whether it's worth a closer inspection.

Thank you so much I will have to look them up!
 
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