microphone Which Lavalier Mics? And Microphone

B7A93BFA-A2FC-411D-B5E1-865588167480.jpeg1) RØDE VideoMic Pro Compact Directional On-camera Microphone.

F3E729C3-6688-4D75-8073-1B245E49F821.jpeg2) RODE Wireless GO - Compact Wireless Microphone System ,WIGO

36B5BBDD-E7AA-4FAB-B546-F44E7018B33E.jpeg3)L
avalier Microphone Wireless,Comica BoomX-D D2 2.4G Lapel Microphone Wireless System.

I will appreciate advice on the above sound equipments. I am trying to purchase these items from Amazon. I mostly need advice on 2& 3, which lavalier mics should I choose??? Advice welcome on other affordable lavelier mics models.

The sounds equipment is for shooting a short horror video.
 
Okay, you are going for the least expensive items possible. That implies to me that you have a seriously limited budget.

A little audio info for you...

Having the microphone mounted on top of the camera is one of the worst places you can put it. The optimum position for a (hypercardioid) microphone is in front of and above the actor, aimed at the notch at the base of the throat. Quite obviously this means that you need to put the mic on a boom-pole, which means that you will need a boom-op. Otherwise you are probably going to end up with low levels and/or noisy and/or unintelligible production dialog.

With wireless systems you need both a transmitter and a receiver in addition to the lavalier microphone. When it comes to wireless systems the RODE is a passable ultra-micro budget alternative. I've never even heard of, much less used, Comica products, so I would be dubious as to the quality. BTW, neither comes with a lav, so you'll need to add that to your budget. You will need AT LEAST two, preferably three (or more), wireless lav systems.

If you give us (me) a FIRM budget we (I) can help you with putting together a passable production sound kit.

My advice for you is as follows....

1) Read "The Location Sound Bible" by Ric Viers. It's a good place to start for a solid look at production sound history, techniques and equipment.

2) Hire a professional production sound tech, or at least work with a talented, ambitious up-and-comer looking to hone their skills.

3) Do not buy, RENT the gear you need. Renting will most assuredly get you much better gear than you could buy. A mentor once told me "If you don't use it every day don't buy it." After your shoot the cheap audio gear you purchased will sit in your closet collecting dust and losing what little resale value it may have.

4) If you absolutely MUST buy gear at least buy quality equipment - at least it will have some resale value.

Just for fun, here's my venerable production sound buyers guide. It's probably up into the $1,750 range now.


Shotgun mic kits will have the shotgun mic, boom-pole, shock-mount and simple wind protection (softie).

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/551607-REG/Audio_Technica_AT_875_Shotgun_Microphone.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/461493-REG/Rode_NTG_1_Shotgun_Condenser.html


Hypercardioid mic:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/867157-REG/Avantone_Pro_CK1_CK_1_Small_Capsule_FET_Pencil.html

My old favorite the SE1a is no longer available. Anything else I like for production sound is in the $500 up range.



Audio recorders:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1086798-REG/tascam_dr_70d_4_channel_audio_recording.html

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1084690-REG/tascam_dr_60mkii_portable_recorder_for_dslr.html

Any decent audio recorder with XLR inputs will do the job, but these are "aimed" at indie filmmakers.



Headphones:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/49510-REG/Sony_MDR_7506_MDR_7506_Headphone.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/507447-REG/Sennheiser_HD_25_1_II_HD_25_1_II.html



You'll also need cables, cases, battery packs and other miscellaneous items - about $200 to $500.


Your project will only look as good as it sounds, because
"Sound is half of the experience"

If your film looks terrible but has great sound, people might just think it's your aesthetic.
If your film looks great and has bad sound, people will think you're an amateur.

Sound is the first indicator to the industry that you know what you're doing.
 
Hi Alcove Audio, I appreciate the in-depth response. I did media at University years ago, but went to pursue a different career path. I have now decided to return back to filming, at my spare time. Video editing and directing are my strongest skills, and the last video I produced was ruined by bad sounds. So, truly sounds is indeed very important!

I will be purchasing a boompole as from experience, I will never trust the camera sounds quality for making film. It's okay for ordinary interviews, but not for filming. I do 100% agreed with you.

My sounds equipment budget is £500 for this year.

Most likely by end of next year, my sounds budget will expand to £1000 or more. I intend to do lots of short films. So, renting sounds equipment will not be an option. I am strongly considering experimenting with sounds by getting the actors to do an indoor voice recording in a quieter room. Also, considering capturing realistic background sounds or buying it, to add during editing, to create a smooth noise.

Thanks, I will have a read on those links you posted later today.
 
Be *very* careful purchasing RØDE products on Amazon. If you go to their website, you’ll see a banner across the top warning of counterfeits, and that any of their products purchased from Amazon (specifically “fulfilled by Amazon”) will not offer any warranty coverage. Buy RØDE products from an authorized dealer in your country.

Also, cheap wireless is a trap. The Wireless GO is fine for what it is, but it has severe limitations. One of the biggest challenges is range, especially if the transmitter is on the actor’s back. With a human body between transmitter and receiver, range decreases drastically.

As for Comica, that’s an off brand like Saramonic, and often gets reviews for being noisy. Again, cheap wireless is a trap. The price point may look great, but performance will be frustrating and may leave you with more in post than you’re able to fix.

I have now decided to return back to filming, at my spare time. Video editing and directing are my strongest skills, and the last video I produced was ruined by bad sounds. So, truly sounds is indeed very important!

And buying cheap gear isn’t going to help your situation. You’re doing this, you say, in your spare time. So... it’s a hobby? Why not network with the local indie film community in Birmingham and get to know some budding sound mixers who have both the necessary equipment and the drive to learn and know how to use it? You’ll be much better off having someone on your team who can focus on sound and only sound.

I will be purchasing a boompole as from experience, I will never trust the camera sounds quality for making film. It's okay for ordinary interviews, but not for filming. I do 100% agreed with you.

On-camera mic isn’t even good for ordinary interviews.

My sounds equipment budget is £500 for this year.

Most likely by end of next year, my sounds budget will expand to £1000 or more. I intend to do lots of short films. So, renting sounds equipment will not be an option.

Again, team up with someone who does sound AND has even a basic sound kit.

I am strongly considering experimenting with sounds by getting the actors to do an indoor voice recording in a quieter room. Also, considering capturing realistic background sounds or buying it, to add during editing, to create a smooth noise.

As Bob said, get a copy of The Location Sound Bible. Read it thoroughly. You also ought to read up on post-production sound and learn about layering in sound design. Recording “realistic background sounds” requires a different arsenal in your mic collection, and using it to smooth out the soundscape in your film takes several layers of different sounds.
 
Be *very* careful purchasing RØDE products on Amazon. If you go to their website, you’ll see a banner across the top warning of counterfeits, and that any of their products purchased from Amazon (specifically “fulfilled by Amazon”) will not offer any warranty coverage. Buy RØDE products from an authorized dealer in your country.

Also, cheap wireless is a trap. The Wireless GO is fine for what it is, but it has severe limitations. One of the biggest challenges is range, especially if the transmitter is on the actor’s back. With a human body between transmitter and receiver, range decreases drastically.

As for Comica, that’s an off brand like Saramonic, and often gets reviews for being noisy. Again, cheap wireless is a trap. The price point may look great, but performance will be frustrating and may leave you with more in post than you’re able to fix.



And buying cheap gear isn’t going to help your situation. You’re doing this, you say, in your spare time. So... it’s a hobby? Why not network with the local indie film community in Birmingham and get to know some budding sound mixers who have both the necessary equipment and the drive to learn and know how to use it? You’ll be much better off having someone on your team who can focus on sound and only sound.



On-camera mic isn’t even good for ordinary interviews.



Again, team up with someone who does sound AND has even a basic sound kit.



As Bob said, get a copy of The Location Sound Bible. Read it thoroughly. You also ought to read up on post-production sound and learn about layering in sound design. Recording “realistic background sounds” requires a different arsenal in your mic collection, and using it to smooth out the soundscape in your film takes several layers of different sounds.
Thanks for the advice, especially buying directly from Amazon. Surely, I will need to network with some indie film making group in Birmingham. I definitely going to order the ’The location Sound Bible’ book. I have a lots to learn. I appreciate your suggestion. I am glad to have found this forum.
 
Thanks for the advice, especially buying directly from Amazon.

Find yourself a reputable vendor. (Are you in Birmingham UK or Birmingham USA?) I use B&H and Sweetwater. It proved to be very useful using them as vendors when my studio was flooded in 2007. All my records/receipts were lost, and both companies were able to provide me with duplicate receipts for insurance. It's also useful when adding or upgrading equipment; my vendors have my gear list, and have caught incompatibilities before I made the purchase.

Surely, I will need to network with some indie film making group in Birmingham.

Work on other projects. Be a PA, or any other position for which you qualify. It's an educational investment - you'll see what works and what doesn't - it's a personnel investment - you'll meet others on both sides of the camera with whom you may want to work in the future - and it's a "favor" investment.

I definitely going to order the ’The location Sound Bible’ book. I have a lots to learn. I appreciate your suggestion. I am glad to have found this forum.

It's a place to start. You should also invest some time reading a number of audio post books as well, such as Dialog Editing by John Purcell and The Foley Grail by Vanessa Ament. There are quite a few others that will give you more insight into the world of sound-for-picture. "Sound is half of the experience," remember? Even if you don't do the audio post yourself you'll understand the process and terminology.


I would not recommend using a lavelier for movies, unless its a documentary.

Actually, it has become fairly standard practice to wire up all of the speaking parts with wireless lavs as well as using a boomed mic. On more well budgeted projects it is not at all unusual for me to receive two or three lavs in addition to the boomed mic; I've had up to five lavs. They certainly can save the day when the DX is especially noisy
 
Actually, it has become fairly standard practice to wire up all of the speaking parts with wireless lavs as well as using a boomed mic. On more well budgeted projects it is not at all unusual for me to receive two or three lavs in addition to the boomed mic; I've had up to five lavs. They certainly can save the day when the DX is especially noisy

I will keep that in mind. Most of the time I use a Cardioïde when its noisy. I will experiment with it.
 
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Find yourself a reputable vendor. (Are you in Birmingham UK or Birmingham USA?) I use B&H and Sweetwater. It proved to be very useful using them as vendors when my studio was flooded in 2007. All my records/receipts were lost, and both companies were able to provide me with duplicate receipts for insurance. It's also useful when adding or upgrading equipment; my vendors have my gear list, and have caught incompatibilities before I made the purchase.



Work on other projects. Be a PA, or any other position for which you qualify. It's an educational investment - you'll see what works and what doesn't - it's a personnel investment - you'll meet others on both sides of the camera with whom you may want to work in the future - and it's a "favor" investment.



It's a place to start. You should also invest some time reading a number of audio post books as well, such as Dialog Editing by John Purcell and The Foley Grail by Vanessa Ament. There are quite a few others that will give you more insight into the world of sound-for-picture. "Sound is half of the experience," remember? Even if you don't do the audio post yourself you'll understand the process and terminology.




Actually, it has become fairly standard practice to wire up all of the speaking parts with wireless lavs as well as using a boomed mic. On more well budgeted projects it is not at all unusual for me to receive two or three lavs in addition to the boomed mic; I've had up to five lavs. They certainly can save the day when the DX is especially noisy
Thanks, like the vendor advice. I live in Birmingham, UK 🇬🇧. I want to go ahead and purchase two lavs and boomed mic. I guess, the best way to learn is to practice, make mistakes, correct mistakes, practice, make mistakes, practice, repeat * repeat* until you become a sound pro. I will take my time and read these audio books.
 
If you WANT!! a cheap wireless set you also have to consider the Fei-Du FM-40. Early tests place it above the RODE Wireless GO. Good for vlogs and weddings. Would not recommend using a lavelier for movies, unless its a documentary.
Thanks for the suggestion re *Fei-Du FM-40*. The only problem, it doesn't seem to be available in the UK online market. I noticed most of these recommended budget filming equipments are often abundant in US not in UK.
 
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