What boompole would you recommend in this case?

sfoster

Staff Member
Moderator
You can't direct from the boom's perspective.
If you are directing only what your camera sees is real.
I don't say it often, but if you can't figure THAT out yourself...
Feel free to laugh but I direct and boom at the same time.

People want to use the camera, they think it's cool and they'll help out with the camera.
NO ONE wants to hold the boom and help out with the boom. it's just facts of life for me.

I can't get anyone to boom but i can get someone to camera, so I take what I can get.
 
Yes I have figured that out for myself, but I also find myself having to make compromises as well. I directed my first short holding the boom in some parts. Is that bad? I don't mind personally cause I am use to booming a lot more. But yes, I cannot see through the camera, and will have to pause to go over footage, instead of just keep going, take after take.

Do you think that pausing to look it over would delay too much time maybe?
 
Last edited:
Feel free to laugh but I direct and boom at the same time.

People want to use the camera, they think it's cool and they'll help out with the camera.
NO ONE wants to hold the boom and help out with the boom. it's just facts of life for me.

I can't get anyone to boom but i can get someone to camera, so I take what I can get.
I'm not laughing at all. (There is a 'sad' truth is what you say.)
Mel Gibson acts and directs, but he is smart enough to first communicate what needs to be shot and then watches what has been shot. I guess you do that as well.
H44, however, is the champion of assumptions. And assumptions are the mother of all f%^$ ups.
So if he is not shooting, he needs a monitor, otherwise it will be a mess AND everything will take to much time.
 
Yeah I can get a monitor and playback everything that has been shot after, if that's best. But I felt that constantly playing it back after it's been shot, took more time, but if it's worth it I can do it again. On my first short, I wasn't behind the camera most of the time, and I had to play all the takes back after, so is that the way to go?
 
Last edited:
Well I have to make compromises and if picking up the boom is one of them, than that's one of them. I was told before on here I have to do what it takes to make things work. So why is me suggesting a compromise, so bad? I am told to make compromises, so I ask about certain compromises, then I am told not to make them, once I have decided on what they are.

I want to make compromises here and there to get it made, but as soon as I ask about them, the answer is "don't". But how do I get the movie made if I don't?

I am trying to not be Mr. perfect, and make compromises to do what I can but I feel like I am being told 'don't', to often and it's limiting the advice I was given to not make excuses. Wouldn't me not picking up the boom if I have to, and then looking over the footage later, be an excuse?
 
Last edited:
Yeah I can get a monitor and playback everything that has been shot after, if that's best. But I felt that constantly playing it back after it's been shot, took more time, ........
As long as you 'felt' it took more time to stop shooting and watch the shot instead of that you know it does, it is a compromise that will ruin whatever time schedule you try to make.
Once you know that stopping everything and watching every shot takes time (up to 5 times the amount of time it took to shoot that take (unless you want to ask opinions online, then it takes 1000x), you might be able to handle it.
Remembering you complaining that you had 1) not enough time to shoot and 2) you couldn't see what the DOP was shooting until after shooting, it seems that you need to be at the visual helm instead of quadrupling your shoot time.

Or, you just shoot it like this if it is the way to make you go and shoot stuff: go for it!
I don't want to stop you!
What will you shoot next?
 
I can try to find someone who can rotate the boom from actor to actor properly, but it's been hard. Mostly it's only needed for the mastershots and action oriented shots. If it's an OTS or close up for example, I can keep the mic on the actor who's face is in the shot.

I am either going to shoot the short film script next, or one of the poems from the site that was suggested to me. A lot of the poems have imagery in that I do not have in my area, and was thinking of making changes, but if I do, it makes the poems not gel as well somewhat. But either that or the short film script. I am waiting on responses on that one.

I also have a musician wanting to do a music video so far.
 
I don't want to put suggestions into your head, but I've quite often been the dolly, camera operator, focus puller and not so much the boom operator (we normally just hot shoe the shotgun mic or strategically lay the mic down where it can be hidden from camera) but audio monitor all at the same time. Good times. You gotta do what you gotta do haha. But I've also been paranoid when I don't monitor my own audio because I'm used to hearing what the mics hearing via headphones. It comes down to trusting the other operator and/or teaching them.
 
Last edited:
Well the reason why I thought I might be the boom operator is because I have not been able to find many in my area, compared to the camera related jobs where their are more people. I don't have to be the boom operator, I am just wanting to be ready to take it on, just in case, so I don't have to do ADR again.
 
Well the reason why I thought I might be the boom operator is because I have not been able to find many in my area, compared to the camera related jobs where their are more people. I don't have to be the boom operator, I am just wanting to be ready to take it on, just in case, so I don't have to do ADR again.
If the camera's stationary, especially during dialogue, there's nothing stopping you from booming yourself.
 
I could have a stationary camera, but one of the comments on my previous short film is that there was not enough camera movement, people were saying, and I wanted to improve in that area as well, if possible... If someone can shoot it that way, should I do it, or if I am not being able to see through the camera at the time, is best just to keep it still to be safe...
 
Last edited:
Do whatever you feel comfortable doing. The only limitation is your own personal ability to pull it off.

If you're keen on adding movement then this is where a mic stand would come in handy. Is it professional? Depends on your definition, but it certainly gets the job done.
 
Well I tried the mic stand before, but the actor would drift on and off axis into it, so I feel I have to boom, and keep the mic moving with the actors mouth. If the actor moves only a few inches, the axis can be off, so maybe I should just keep the camera stationary perhaps.
 
Well I am shopping for a boom pole, and still deciding on which one to get. When a pole goes over 12 feet, the price goes up a lot, compared to 12 feet and under. Do you think I would ever need a pole over 12 feet, is 12 feet plenty, for pretty wide shots?
 
Top