The Last Straw...

All right. I can't STAND it any more. Cracker Funk's thread is just WAY TOO MUCH fun.

The Funkmeister's gallant and heroic effort kicks ass and has me biting my nails and cheering him on.

I never thought I could actually MAKE movies. I'm a writer by inclination...

SO...

I'm headed out to Best Buy. They've got a deal on the T2i. And great financing: 36 months at no interest. That includes any extra lenses. What should I get besides the standard lens it comes with? They've got a cool 55-250mm f/4-5.6 Telephoto Zoom Lens for $300. Should I have them throw that in? Would I use it much? What other accessories should I pick up?

-Charles



I"m skeered. Am I doing the right thing? :D
 
Yes. And that's obviously not rocket science. Any filmmaking book (or forum) can quickly teach you how to compose a subject in a shot (headroom, face distance and direction).

More to the point, you are taught what NOT to do. :) It's good to know these things, I agree. Most of the glaringly obvious shot screw ups are obvious...like when a subject is looking right, you have more room in front of their face and not behind...that comes naturally to most people. I mean, we are a society of audience members as well--we know what looks wrong and feels off (most of us do anyway).

:)

Hey, I just wanted to see him compose some shots inside with interesting lighting. I just don't want anyone to get in the habit of using only 'nat lighting.' And this was a first test...I know that. I'm just excited to see some other groovy stuff.
 
Last edited:
I don't think it comes as naturally as you are implying. And, yes, the stuff I mentioned is all very basic, it's in tons of books, and can be found for free by doing some googling. I only posted it to highlight the fact that it needs to be (in my opinion) the first things a filmmaker learns and practices.
 
Funk.. stop the hate, stop the hate..

(the DR is IN)


I know your were consciously responding to the idea that someone should not focus on deep cinematography when starting out as a filmmaker, but subconsciously? I don't believe that it is coincidental that you chose to only DISAGREE after someone suggested "lighting design" might be a good next step..

Tell me, how long have you felt this way about lighting design?:P
 
Funk.. stop the hate, stop the hate..

(the DR is IN)


I know your were consciously responding to the idea that someone should not focus on deep cinematography when starting out as a filmmaker, but subconsciously? I don't believe that it is coincidental that you chose to only DISAGREE after someone suggested "lighting design" might be a good next step..

Tell me, how long have you felt this way about lighting design?:P

Haha. I love you, wheat. It seems clear to me, at this point, that you personally desire very much to focus on the DP side of things. That's awesome! You found your niche, and that's exactly what you should spend your time learning. I could be wrong, obviously I can't speak for the guy, but I don't believe Charles plans to be a DP. If I understand his plans correctly, he wants to direct his own writing. That being the case, I think there's other stuff that needs to be learned first.

Like the 180 Rule! :)
 
I feel it, the love, the love man..

I say what ever gets him hooked! Even if he has no intention of being behind the camera when his first script enters production, being interested, engaged, in any aspect, even "lighting design" will only lead him deeper into movie madness... obsession, and great art.

Its like my wife and computers.. for YEARS, I would introduce new things to her about how great computers were, .. Yawn... then crackbook, I mean facebook, and boom! Shes hooked, she hits that pipe everyday now, and now the other aspects that are interesting to me, come along for the ride.. everyone wins!
 
Also, as Robert Heinlein said..
“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.”

Specialization is for insects!
 
LOL

You guys are crazy good.

Funk nailed it. I want to direct my own scripts.

But Michae1 happened to suggest what I was intending to do next: compose an indoor shot with specialized lighting. It's an exercise I want to undertake to learn more about light vis-a-vis my camera. I mean, we all live and die by the whims and laws of light in filmmaking. (oh, and sound too - *glances nervously at ROC and Audio Alcove*). Of course I don't want to get too deeply involved in it, but I've learned the truth that while you don't need to be a mechanic to drive a car, I prefer riding with one on a long road-trip.

Cheers!

-Charles
 
Top