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camera "The East" Jonney E TV - Best of 2019 (Showreel)



Scenes from select projects filmed over the course of 2019.


Filming locations: New Jersey, New York City & Boston, MA

Shot on: Canon C300 II, C100 II & DJI Mavic 2 Pro

Projects include work for: Nike, Jordan, adidas Originals, NBA 2K, Shore Car Club, NYC Jam, BET, Glenfiddich, Reebok, Converse, Brooklyn Nets, New York Knicks.

With names such as: Jesse & TJ Mizell, Aaron Judge, Jamal Adams, Kendall Jenner, Stretch Armstrong, Seth Fowler & Kevin Durant.


Music: Lies - "Oriente" featuring Juno


Social: YT: http://youtube.com/jonneyetv | IG: http://instagram.com/jonedwards.tv
 
You got feedback, you just didn't know how to interpret it. Basically the stronger your product, the less people feel like you need help. Cell phone footage that's shaking all over the place, gets 100 comments. People give kind words of encouragement, suggest stabilizer equipment, etc. That deafening silence you hear after your long hours of hard work on this. That's the sound of people watching your video, being impressed, and walking away thinking about what they've seen.

I do remember what it was like before I realized this, feeling like the silence meant people didn't like my work, so I'll give you some feedback. It's great ok, your work looks great. The worse video you post, the more forum responses you get.

I'll go further and illustrate the psychological phenomenon at work across your entire lifespan. Think of every sitcom that was highly popular. The main character is an idiot. Homer Simpson, Peter Griffin, Frasier, Sam, and so many others were constantly screwing up. The reason being that the audience is happy and comfortable only when they are looking down at someone. When they are looking up, they have to think. People always stop me and say that Frasier was smart, but he wasn't, it was an illusion. He had a smart sounding job, but would loose an altercation with a folding chair, or a dog. Setting him up as an intellectual character only made the audience feel more superior every time Frasier failed at a task an average person could have easily handled.

Your work is commercially viable. Continue building a client list, and just living in an area with opportunities, and you will probably do very well.

Congratulations man, it's a really nice reel, and I can't find any fault with it.
 
You got feedback, you just didn't know how to interpret it. Basically the stronger your product, the less people feel like you need help. Cell phone footage that's shaking all over the place, gets 100 comments. People give kind words of encouragement, suggest stabilizer equipment, etc. That deafening silence you hear after your long hours of hard work on this. That's the sound of people watching your video, being impressed, and walking away thinking about what they've seen.

I do remember what it was like before I realized this, feeling like the silence meant people didn't like my work, so I'll give you some feedback. It's great ok, your work looks great. The worse video you post, the more forum responses you get.

I'll go further and illustrate the psychological phenomenon at work across your entire lifespan. Think of every sitcom that was highly popular. The main character is an idiot. Homer Simpson, Peter Griffin, Frasier, Sam, and so many others were constantly screwing up. The reason being that the audience is happy and comfortable only when they are looking down at someone. When they are looking up, they have to think. People always stop me and say that Frasier was smart, but he wasn't, it was an illusion. He had a smart sounding job, but would loose an altercation with a folding chair, or a dog. Setting him up as an intellectual character only made the audience feel more superior every time Frasier failed at a task an average person could have easily handled.

Your work is commercially viable. Continue building a client list, and just living in an area with opportunities, and you will probably do very well.

Congratulations man, it's a really nice reel, and I can't find any fault with it.
A very thoughtful response. I appreciate the kind words. It is a great analogy to understand the meaning behind the feedback or lack there of. I will keep it in mind moving forward. Thank you, it means a lot.
 
I just watched this, hadn't seen it before, so this is probably a little late, but . . . OK, we have some guys on a beach, some birds, some landscapes, some shoes, cars, dudes playing basketball, etc. So why did I just watch it three times in succession? I may not have the critical vocabulary to answer, but I'll try.

The photography is beautiful--lighting, composition, focal stuff, everything. The camera movements, the pans and zooms and etc., flow, merge, build and release in a profoundly pleasing way. The editing, the length of each shot, the sequence, the choices, are all so smart. And what really sells it, for me, is that each of these I don't know how many shots and sequences conveys an emotion. And the music compliments this.

As a highlight reel, to show what you can do, to display your talent, it is, to me, very successful.

As far as responses go, Nate is probably right. But in addition, I would imagine the quality of this is intimidating; it is professional work beyond the present capabilities of most of us. As such, it is something to learn from, so, thanks (belatedly) for posting.
 
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And one more thought. This film views like like one unified thing. I wonder, J, (if you see this) if you had a few words about what you thought unifies it, about any specific thematic (or other) foci.
 
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Having done a lot of similar work in the past, I can shed a bit of light on this guys process. Reels like this don't just happen, and it's not just talent alone. You only get results like this from

1: Understanding your equipment on a technical level
2. A true love of the artform, the kind where you really enjoy going out and shooting and do it often
3. Patience. Flocks of birds don't just fly across your frame in perfect balance all the time, and not every jogger is always jogging through a shaft a light perfectly filtered by a grove of trees at magic hour. You have to go out day after day, looking for opportunities, and waiting for the stars to align.
4. Shooting 100 clips for every one that you use in your reel. This video is what happens when someone shoots all the time, and then boils it down like you're supposed to.

Out in the wild (non studio work) I used to shoot an average of 20-30x the footage that would be used in the final product. For an annual demo, it's obviously way more. I expect that this guy went through hundreds of hours of footage over the course of this particular year.

In short, this guy is obviously intelligent, hardworking, and loves videography enough that he consistently spends a lot of time on it. For businesses looking to hire video people - this is the type of person you are looking for.

But I'm sure we'd all be more interested in hearing from the creator, as opposed to my post game analysis.
 
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