Should I get a new camera?

My dad wanted a DSLR for his birthday, so I was going to give him my Canon T2i, since maybe I should get a new camera in the future anyway. I would save more money doing that, than buying him another camera, then buying a whole new one for myself.

But I was thinking, perhaps it's better just to use money in the future to higher DPs, instead of get my own new one. Right now in filmmaking, it seems that people rely on me to have my own equipment too much, rather than just use theirs. I got a DP to shoot a short of mine for example, but her car was impounded along with the camera inside, she told me later, and cannot afford to get the car out. And she says we can just use mine instead.

But I figure in the future, my money may be more well spent if I just hire better people who are more reliable on having their own equipment. They know that they cannot allow anything to go wrong, if they want to remain hired for the movie, since I don't have a good enough back up camera, on hand, so maybe the money will be more well spent on better disciplined people. I often have to fill in for an actor anyway, and do not like having to set up the camera, and have it rolling with no one behind it.

Or if I should get my own camera still just in case I need it, I would like to know which is the best for me? Outdoors at night on downtown streets has always been a concern as I may want a camera that is better on noise. I was told the GH3 and perhaps the new GH4 coming out are. The new GH4 I hear has a global shutter too, so no jello effect problems hopefully!

I would also like a camera that can shoot at 60fps and still be at full HD, or perhaps even higher frames per seconds speeds, for slow motion if I want it. I would also like one where I can dial in the color temperature manually, allowing me to choose whichever temperature I want, rather than relying on magic lantern which can be a bit faulty sometimes I find.

I would also like a camera, that can not only take prime lenses but hopefully zoom lenses, with a constant aperture for zooming, and not have it be too expensive. But if that's not an option I can color correct the aperture changes in during the zoom I suppose. I would also like a camera that has a good amount of picture styles to choose from to give better cinematic looks.

I guess that's it for all I want in a new camera. If I think of more features I will add them in. Any ideas what camera could best suit these low budget needs? Another thing is camera technology is changing so much now, compared to audio technology. You can use the same field recorder for years and people will think it's good, but with cameras, it seems that everyone wanted HD when it came out over SD, and now 4K is coming, so maybe a GH3 will be considered sub-par in two years. I would like a camera, hopefully good enough that I would not have to update again for at least 8 years if I am to buy another one, as oppose to relying on a DP.

Thanks.
 
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Alcove Audio

Business Member
indieBIZ
You should get a new career/hobby and give up on filmmaking.
 
GH4 has improved read speed from the sensor which is supposed to reduce rolling shutter artifacts, but it's not a global shutter camera. As I understood the last material I read, if I missed a revised spec or something then ignore that comment. :)

As to your options, I don't really know. You've often lamented not being able to find crew local to you. On the other hand working with a shooter and their kit lets you focus on your writing/directing/producing and storytelling skills. Or whatever combination suits you best.
 
The new GH4 I hear has a global shutter too
False.

The GH4 does not have a global shutter. Additionally, while I personally think global shutter is awesome and worth a loss in dynamic range. Global shutter will have less dynamic range than a rolling shutter camera, thus less light sensitivity, thus lower "low light" performance. However negligible that may be.
 
My dad wanted a DSLR for his birthday, so I was going to give him my Canon T2i, since maybe I should get a new camera in the future anyway.

...perhaps it's better just to use money in the future to higher DPs, instead of get my own new one...

...I often have to fill in for an actor anyway...

50360e291d41c876f3000048.jpg


No, really.. what do you envision is YOUR actual role on set? You speak of hiring DPs, but then talk about running the camera yourself. You mention "filling in" for actors, etc.

If you had to classify yourself in one on-set role, what would that be?
 
I would also like a camera, that can not only take prime lenses but hopefully zoom lenses, with a constant aperture for zooming, and not have it be too expensive. But if that's not an option I can color correct the aperture changes in during the zoom I suppose.

Everything about those two sentences tells me that you are not qualified to own or operate a camera of any kind.

Constant aperture depends on the lens, not the camera. Interchangeable lens mount means you can use anything that is made for, or can be adapted to, that mount: primes or zooms. How do you not get this yet?

Color correct the aperture changes?! Do you have any clue how any of this works? Sure, you can try and blur things in the background (has nothing to do with color correction, by the way), but it won't look right. Also, good luck going the other way.
 
No, really.. what do you envision is YOUR actual role on set? You speak of hiring DPs, but then talk about running the camera yourself. You mention "filling in" for actors, etc.

If you had to classify yourself in one on-set role, what would that be?

I would say I am the producer/director, and writer, if I wrote the script I am doing. I aim to hire more experienced DPs, so as director I can concentrate more on directing, rather than constantly have to be behind the camera. But if I have to get behind the camera, than I will.

Everything about those two sentences tells me that you are not qualified to own or operate a camera of any kind.

Constant aperture depends on the lens, not the camera. Interchangeable lens mount means you can use anything that is made for, or can be adapted to, that mount: primes or zooms. How do you not get this yet?

Color correct the aperture changes?! Do you have any clue how any of this works? Sure, you can try and blur things in the background (has nothing to do with color correction, by the way), but it won't look right. Also, good luck going the other way.

I know I can use a lens mount, but what I meant was is their a camera out there, that has lenses, that I would not need to pay extra for the mount, and a lens that would not cost something like $2000, that is my only option to mount on it.

I mean color correct the changes, as in make everything look the like it's the same exposure. The blur in the background does not matter, as many movies, have a background go more blurry as the lens zooms in. That does not matter as the main subject remains in focus. Background going out of focus does not matter, so I know what I want, when I am talking about it. As far as not knowing what kind of camera, I want for my needs, that's why I ask.
 
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I think you should produce something with your current DSLR first!

I'm sure your dad will not be using the DSLR much. Share it.

There's no point in spending more $$$ on another DSLR when despite 4,500+ posts (and having a DSLR) you have not filmed a short/feature/scene with your current one...

Come on H44. You must have known you would get a lot of flack for asking this question here.
 
My dad wanted a DSLR for his birthday, so I was going to give him my Canon T2i, since maybe I should get a new camera in the future anyway. I would save more money doing that, than buying him another camera, then buying a whole new one for myself.

But I was thinking, perhaps it's better just to use money in the future to higher DPs, instead of get my own new one. Right now in filmmaking, it seems that people rely on me to have my own equipment too much, rather than just use theirs. I got a DP to shoot a short of mine for example, but her car was impounded along with the camera inside, she told me later, and cannot afford to get the car out. And she says we can just use mine instead.

But I figure in the future, my money may be more well spent if I just hire better people who are more reliable on having their own equipment. They know that they cannot allow anything to go wrong, if they want to remain hired for the movie, since I don't have a good enough back up camera, on hand, so maybe the money will be more well spent on better disciplined people. I often have to fill in for an actor anyway, and do not like having to set up the camera, and have it rolling with no one behind it.

Or if I should get my own camera still just in case I need it, I would like to know which is the best for me? Outdoors at night on downtown streets has always been a concern as I may want a camera that is better on noise. I was told the GH3 and perhaps the new GH4 coming out are. The new GH4 I hear has a global shutter too, so no jello effect problems hopefully!

I would also like a camera that can shoot at 60fps and still be at full HD, or perhaps even higher frames per seconds speeds, for slow motion if I want it. I would also like one where I can dial in the color temperature manually, allowing me to choose whichever temperature I want, rather than relying on magic lantern which can be a bit faulty sometimes I find.

I would also like a camera, that can not only take prime lenses but hopefully zoom lenses, with a constant aperture for zooming, and not have it be too expensive. But if that's not an option I can color correct the aperture changes in during the zoom I suppose. I would also like a camera that has a good amount of picture styles to choose from to give better cinematic looks.

I guess that's it for all I want in a new camera. If I think of more features I will add them in. Any ideas what camera could best suit these low budget needs? Another thing is camera technology is changing so much now, compared to audio technology. You can use the same field recorder for years and people will think it's good, but with cameras, it seems that everyone wanted HD when it came out over SD, and now 4K is coming, so maybe a GH3 will be considered sub-par in two years. I would like a camera, hopefully good enough that I would not have to update again for at least 8 years if I am to buy another one, as oppose to relying on a DP.

Thanks.
Step 1) Pull out your camera.
Step 2) Get it ready to shoot (don't shoot a gun, shoot with the camera, okay buddy?).
Step 3) Shoot something (with your camera, no shooting people with guns).

YOU DID IT! YOU SHOT SOMETHING!

txt_easy123.gif
 
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I have shot lots of things with the camera. I did camera tests for a lot of the weekend actually. It's not like I don't do anything when it comes to filmmaking. I practice a lot actually.

I have a short film shoot coming up, and I can get that done. Of course I will still borrow the camera, but I might move away, to an area with more filmmakers to work with hopefully if the opportunity to get a cheaper house comes, so in that event, I may want a new camera.
 
I have shot lots of things with the camera. I did camera tests for a lot of the weekend actually. It's not like I don't do anything when it comes to filmmaking. I practice a lot actually.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMMMMEEEENNNN!

I have a short film shoot coming up, and I can get that done. Of course I will still borrow the camera, but I might move away, to an area with more filmmakers to work with hopefully if the opportunity to get a cheaper house comes, so in that event, I may want a new camera.

Congrats on your soon-to-come shoot & best of luck. Make it happen! I beeeeeellliiieeeeeevvveeee iiinnnnn yooouuuu!!!

To answer your original question: no, you do not need a new camera. If you are going to invest money into anything, put it into lenses, audio, and lighting. The camera has surprisingly less to do with a nice image than 90% of new filmmakers think.

Good luck!
 
No.

You haven't mastered using this camera you have now yet.
You haven't made great stuff with it yet.

A new camera will only cost money.
You will still have all your 'problems', because you don't listen, you don't think and you don't do.
And you will be disappointed it won't look magically superior because of that.
Besides that: it you don't make anything 'real' with this camera, why bother to get a new one?
Do you think a new camera will attrack cast and crew?
Will it attrack creative thinking and skills?
Do you believe it will give you more motivation and more energy?

I have a secret for you:
motivation, energy and creative thoughts are not trapped in new cameras waiting for you to release them.
Skills are not included with a new camera. You'll need to do something to get them, and buying stuff isn't one of them (unless you want to work on your buying-stuff-skills).
Cast and crew don't really care about the camera if you can show something good. And they care if less if you can't show anything.

So:
good luck with your short :)
 
Dear H44,

I hate to be the one to inform you, but you entire thought pattern is wrong. You are considering producer issues way, way too much. You've shown, time and time again that you don't have the aptitude required of that position. A producer must have common sense, problem solving abilities, a clue, the ability to assemble a team and capable to find resources needed to make, market and sell a film. None of which you have.

I know you mean well, but please, by the power vested in me, I declare you banned from filling a producer role. Your life will be happier that way. It'll also force you to develop skills in other areas as sensible people tend not to bring idiots in for those key positions.

Whether you buy a camera or not is really inconsequential to your career. Well, unless you go out and buy an Alexa and the appropriate glass, but really, why would you? Hell, why would I care, it's your money and you've shown time and time again you simply don't listen.

Buying new shiny tools is tempting. You may feel like others look for those with the better gear. It's true. Some do. With the new 4k cameras coming out for $3k (or less), you're going to find cameras/DOP's will be even more of a dime a dozen than they are now.

Good luck with your short. I know how painful it can be. I have my first directed short coming out hopefully at the beginning of March (I got a real kick of tearing up most of the women in the test screening - yes from the drama short!) and the next one at the end of April. Have fun with it. Learn lots. Improve as you go. Meet lots of great people. Tell a great story. For producing and directing, I cannot emphasize enough the importance of a well told story and a great team.
 
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