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film-school New York Film Academy - Online Workshops

Problem with online courses is there is no playground but the one you have at home already available.

For that amount of money, you aren't getting much of a safety net to learn and grow in other than the school of hard knocks, right?

$2k is a huge leap to take.

How many films have you made already without school?
 
Wow I'm very appreciative of all the input I've gotten for this question, and I'll try to answer the follow-up questions as best I can. I'm still new to this forum so the best I can currently do is address each user in their own line:

sfoster - My current consulting role is about 50% in-person work and 50% remote work (a little more remote now because of COVID). Part of the services we offer is an onsite visit where I walk and personally status the project (as an independent 3rd party) then get with the construction team to go over everything and make sure were on the same page. For translating our/my scheduling services to film, I think a part of this could still apply. Speaking specifically about a larger production that requires set construction, this would sort of be a one-to-one conversion where I could see how the construction is coming along, and meet with the onsite team to see how their plan is coming. Same for stunts or other choreographed elements (chase sequences, etc.).

And yes, the small project I've helped with was a short film of about 15 pages, so it would like using our scheduling services to build a house. Its so small that a robust schedule isn't really needed because the scale is too small to really warrant anything larger. But hey, you gotta start somewhere

indietalk - I will definitely look into that PA position. Something remote to start out with would be perfect, and that might be a good opportunity to get a foot in the door

directorik - I'm glad to hear I'm not crazy in thinking some of my skills are already transferable. Like I mentioned before, it seems like current production scheduling is rather limited to the Shooting Schedule, so my idea of this 'overall' schedule (which would include pre and post production) would hopefully be something new that would be useful to the team.

To answer your question of 'on-set' work, I don't believe I would need to be onset all the time, but this goes back to my current lack of knowledge for how sets are run. To me, the best way to learn is to physically see it (same with construction), but the trick is to find something that works with my current schedule. Honestly, I think it would be really cool so be onset some days and see how things are run, but you are correct in saying thats not really my end goal. More of a "pop-in" to see how things are running, and status the schedule accordingly to see if any adjustments are needed.

Sweetie - I'll look into that book and online classes, as well as the others mentioned.

To answer your question of "my vision", I don't think this role currently exists. In a nutshell, I envision looking at the script during pre-production and creating a preliminary "Overall Production Schedule" that would have all the elements in the script (cast, locations, stunts, etc.) then meet with the production team to review and fine-tune. This would entail discussing where the locations would be, if there are any constraints regarding cast availability, estimated set construction, permit times for shooting in specific locations, training timelines, etc. Once production actually started, I would periodically check in with the production team and make sure the scenes were being completed within the original time frame. If not, I would look back at the overall schedule and see what adjustments need to be made in order to still complete within the original time. If the original completion date is not possible (due to weather or other circumstances), then provide the production team with information that's transparent with why things got delayed, and what the new completion date is based on the new shooting sequence.

Once production is complete, I would periodically check in with the post production team (editing, sound, marketing, etc.) to see if were on track with our original timeline for the overall completion of the film. If things are delayed, then same as during production, provide the team with where things were delayed and a new completion date so everyone know when it can be released (or distributed).

From what I've been able to research, the above role has elements of a number of different individuals currently (production coordinator, UPM, 1st AD) but I would either consolidate those particularly elements into a new role, or simply be their point of contact with what needed to happen next in the schedule. I haven't fully fleshed everything out yet, but that's the gist of what I'd like to do.

onebaldman - Yes, with the online courses it seems that there's not much area to put these practices into application outside of the computer. That's the main downside to any virtual learning, that they don't offer (as far as I know) any opportunity to physically go out and do these things. I hope that either during the course (if I take it) or after, they would be able to point us in a general direction of next steps for jobs in production, but I have no guarantee.

For how many films I've made, the answer is currently 0. When the world went crazy back in February/March with COVID, I started working on this scheduling method I've talked about, and only recently gotten it to a point where I'm confident it can work in the film industry. I've done theoretical schedules with old scripts I found online (Knives Out, Italian Job, Bourne, etc.) but havent yet found a current production to test out. That's where I am now.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
To answer your question of "my vision", I don't think this role currently exists.

From what I've been able to research, the above role has elements of a number of different individuals currently (production coordinator, UPM, 1st AD) but I would either consolidate those particularly elements into a new role, or simply be their point of contact with what needed to happen next in the schedule. I haven't fully fleshed everything out yet, but that's the gist of what I'd like to do.
You're right, you have combined several roles into one. What you want to
be is the UPM. And then delegate.
 
This is just my opinion, so please don't take this any wrong way or personally. I am not trying to offend or tell you exactly what to do. I'm just trying to help you avoid wasting your time and hard earned dollars.

I think you should avoid doing any online course, period. (Especially right now during the pandemic crisis).

Online film courses (I've take a couple, and even had a Masterclass membership for a year) pretend that you don't know the basics. They will always harp on things that are common knowledge, but try to spin it in a fresh way that creates a placebo effect on your mind. Most of these things will never apply to you and your productions. It's all theory and feedback loops.

If you need that placebo, then by all means... GO FOR IT! Whatever gives you the excuse to try. But don't make the mistake of thinking its anything but a placebo or a guru giving you permission to get started.

You will still be expected to put in all the work, struggle with all the problems, and find your own path.

To me, that just isn't worth the off chance you might jive with an online stranger and get the chance to work on a good production team.

The people you meet during an online course wont be the people you work with in the future. You have a better chance of finding someone local using a forum like this or Facebook.

And before you decide, definitely make a film just to get a taste of how your scheduling system could apply. That's just good practice for any experimental or theoretical prototype.

If no one wants to test it for you, you are going to have to test it on yourself.
 
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indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff Member
Admin
I would like to highlight one word I saw here.

BOOKS

We often forget about books. READ READ READ! @directorik gets credit for reminding us...
 
From what I've been able to research, the above role has elements of a number of different individuals currently (production coordinator, UPM, 1st AD) but I would either consolidate those particularly elements into a new role, or simply be their point of contact with what needed to happen next in the schedule. I haven't fully fleshed everything out yet, but that's the gist of what I'd like to do.

You're kind of cherry picking from those roles. Add producer and post prod coordinator to that list ;)

It might be a bit of a hard sell as those roles have particular duties for particular reasons and changing them can cause issues with large productions.
 
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