directing How to keep Cast/Crew Engaged during Low Budget Shoot?

Desperately trying to not derail @onebaldman's thread, one of my "most prized possessions" is a potato brooch, given to me by a young lady from Idaho, whose path I crossed in the back end of nowhere, France. She was one member of a country dance troupe performing that evening, and I was there to see the show. We had an exciting conversation about potatoes, during which she argued that she was more passionate about them than I, seeing as she'd brought a symbolic potato with her on tour. When I conceded the point, she removed her brooch and pinned it to my hat where it has remained ever since.

The moral of the story: that bit of plastic and metal probably has an intrinsic value of less than 10cts, but is worth far, far more to me because of the circumstances in which I received it. You could think of making up some small goodie-bags to be given to each member of your crew, that contained something whimsical but relevant to what/where you were shooting that weekend.
 

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
Desperately trying to not derail @onebaldman's thread,
Ah, no worries. I am just appreciative of people giving their recommendations and stories.

I never thought about goodie bags. The last project, I got the cast and crew posters with our signatures on it. I always liked that, and have mine framed on my wall.

I know some people keep the last marked slate from each project on their wall. I'll think about what trinkets I could possibly give.
 

jax_rox

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
I keep their minds on the ultimate prize, which is potential awards/nominations from festivals and crowdfunding success
For me personally, nominations, awards, crowdfunding success etc doesn't bother me too much. It does in some capacity - it's nice, but ultimately if I'm working for free, I need to be working with good people first and foremost, and secondly I need to be working on a project I have faith and belief in. By faith and belief, I don't necessarily mean in monetary or award terms. I mean I'm much more likely to be satisfied working for a really fantastic Director, or on a project that has a lot of worth, or a script that I think is absolutely fantastic than I am to work on something that gets funded on Kickstarter but was a pain to work on, or that I didn't believe in the project.

Keep in mind that everyone has their own set of reasons for working for free on your project - everyone has weighed up the benefit to them that working on this brings them. It may be as simple as helping a friend out on a fun project, or it may be hoping for a bit of cash reimbursement when it gets funded on crowdfunding. Assessing everyone's 'reason' for being there will probably make it a bit easier to keep everyone engaged.
 

indietalk

IndieTalk Founder
Staff member
Admin
And here's a tip for you. Pizza is ALWAYS a bad idea. ALWAYS! Pizza is cheap and easy and always seen as a cop out. The mac n cheese bar sounds awesome! If you are doing an early shoot you could do an omelet bar. Stay creative and best of luck!
 

onebaldman

Pro Member
indiePRO
Keep in mind that everyone has their own set of reasons for working for free on your project - everyone has weighed up the benefit to them that working on this brings them. It may be as simple as helping a friend out on a fun project, or it may be hoping for a bit of cash reimbursement when it gets funded on crowdfunding. Assessing everyone's 'reason' for being there will probably make it a bit easier to keep everyone engaged.
Good points. Thank you! I'm thinking its a combo of the script and practical FX that is drawing people in. I'd say my personality probably needs work, but that will take a few more "foot in mouth" experiences.
 
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