Closer to Creating Life in the Laboratory

Interesting.

I wish Dr. Einstein were still alive to debate these guys and other scientists. In the biography, THE UNIVERSE AND DR. EINSTEIN, Dr. Einstein believes in a universal consciousness that exists everywhere and created the univeerse with a big bang of matter that continues to expand today as it spirals away. Einstein is said in this book to believe the Universe is too perfect a big machine to be created and happening randomly. The consciousness exists everywhere.

My personal belief is at some point, cloning, stem cell research,, AI, and Human Minds controlling machines by thought (which Honda in Japan is making remarkable breakthroughs with) will all merge together as we create an artificial consciousness after we get a full map of how the Human brain works and The Singularity will occur and the artificial life forms we will create will help us discover where we come from.
 
I know, MDMPL, interesting questions. Part of me wishes I'd live to see just what crazy (or cool or creepy) stuff our species is going to get up to through future generations, and part of me suspects that it's better I won't.
 
Interesting link; thanks for sharing it. To be frank, I'm not sure how it has any implications on much of anything Sci-Fi. All it does is help explain how life might have begun naturally, without the touch of God.

But it's not like this knowledge is going to turn us into Gods. So what if we can create life, or at least the building blocks of it? What are we going to do with that, other than talk about it?

MDM, Einstein was a freaking genius, and I love him for so many of his political philosophies. But just cuz something came out of his mouth doesn't make it scripture. He said a lot of crazy shit, too. He also made a bunch of shit up. For example, E=MC2 wasn't a scientific discovery; he just made it up. Seriously, that formula is completely arbitrary.

And for all his talk of peace-loving, he helped create the single-worst weapon in human history. Thanks, Einstein!

Furthermore, how the heck does any of what you said have anything to do with the link that richy posted?
 
I agree, Crackersan. I really just think that it's really cool that they seem to be getting closer to explaining how life got started via the natural processes of chemistry.

I agree. Maybe not much to do with writing sci-fi. On the other hand, I'm just thinking that as the origins of life via natural phenomena are better explained, proven, or described scientifically, the imagineer will no longer have to contend with the doubters (or their own doubts) who ask the question: If they (science) know the ingredients for life and say that it can arise out of chemistry on this or another planet without the aid of God, aliens, or comets (heheh, I'm also guessing that comets, though, may have some part in it if by no other means than by bringing whatever raw materials that they delivered to the early Earth), then how is it that they cannot reproduce it in the lab? Well, it has implications for the rise of life on this planet and possibly on other planets. It would show that simple chemistry and physics, not miracles, are all that is required.

So, Imagineers (if I may continue to borrow the term), go ahead and imagine a universe full of planets upon which this sort of chemistry births life galore. Yay!


P.S. Not that we couldn't do so before. :)
 
Einstein had a theory about the creation of life from the Big Bang with an element most scientists leave out, which is a universal consciousness that made it possible that Einstein believes still exists in all living things.

How are they simillar? They are both about the conception of where life came from.
 
Einsteins theory of relativity was also never proven either. Each time they did an experiment something went wrong or they weren't set up in time for the eclipse. However, I do agree with his idea of a collective consciousness through the entire universe. I think thats what causes sophisticated life to act in unexplainable ways ie. humans dreaming or abstract thinking leading to creation of religion and beliefs in God(S). I was talking to a friend during a smoke session and we came up with a thought, human expression is evidence of something greater then the self. The emotions we experience, the art we create in any form, the higher level thinking, I feel all come from and simultaneously contribute to this collective consciousness.

On another note, My favorite Einstein quote, "Be not a man of worth, but rather a man of value". I got this cool poster of him smoking a pipe with maybe 30 einsteinian proverbs. Very cool and brilliant guy.

And Cracker, even the most righteous person will create the most destructive and evil things, if paid enough. Einstein wasn't exactly swimming in dough, his marriage was even hurting from it. No one would first publish his papers-he was almost a nobody until relativity was "accidentally"(digression: I use quotes because perhaps it was meant to be that way-everything discovered about life is leading to something greater, I consider every step going in one direction forward-it was discovered because it had to be not exactly accidental) picked up by someone in America.
 
And Cracker, even the most righteous person will create the most destructive and evil things, if paid enough.

Confession: I kind of exaggerated. I prefer to call it hyperbole, because it's exaggeration to make a point.

Einstein was not paid one penny to help create the atomic bomb. Contrary to popular myth, he was not part of any team of scientists who created, or even just helped to create it. His theory of relativity played heavily into their work, but that's the extent of his scientific contribution.

What he did was write a couple letters to the president of the US, urging him to build the bomb, because if we didn't, the Germans surely would have. Oops, I guess his prediction was wrong.

Thanks, Einstein!
 
Life could have came from Meteorites from space see this article.

http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/195...eteorites-nucleobases-nasa-meteorites-dna.htm

Saw something like that recently, where within the past few years they captured dust from a comet and it had organic compounds and amino acids.

I think we are getting very close for scientists to soon definitively say there IS life out there- even if it's at the microscopic level for the time being-but even that will be quite the shake up, because the question will go from "is there life in the universe" to "how ADVANCED is life in the universe"

We're at the edge of a very exciting time I think.

*Please be sure to up this thread when the aliens come down to rule our earth with a hearty "Exciting times, eh Tinalera??!!!" :D
 
What he did was write a couple letters to the president of the US, urging him to build the bomb, because if we didn't, the Germans surely would have. Oops, I guess his prediction was wrong.

He wasn't exactly wrong about that. German scientists were very close behind us in making the bomb. And us using the bomb helped end the war (I know, I know, it was D-Day and the Russian front that ended had a bigger impact on ending the European front of the war, but still, the bomb put a definitive 'period' on the end of the sentence, so to speak.)

In fact, and you probably know this, but their scientists were so good that part of the treaty ending the war was that we got half of them and Russia/USSR got the other half. Thus begineth the space race. Another interesting tidbit is that during the cold war, there were times that our spy-planes encountered USSR planes of almost identical design, all of which were top secret. The reason being that the German scientists had all been working on those designs before the war was over.
 
He wasn't exactly wrong about that. German scientists were very close behind us in making the bomb. And us using the bomb helped end the war (I know, I know, it was D-Day and the Russian front that ended had a bigger impact on ending the European front of the war, but still, the bomb put a definitive 'period' on the end of the sentence, so to speak.)

Well, that's two different subjects. True, the Germans were working on one, but the war was over before they could finish; that's all I meant.

As for dropping the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, I don't think it had anything to do with ending the war. By that point, the Japanese had already surrendered, but with one condition -- they wanted to keep their emperor. We said no, we wanted an unconditional surrender, then dropped the bombs. Japan surrendered, unconditionally, at which point we told them they could keep their emperor.

Thanks, Einstein!

As for the other bit about the near-identical spy-planes, no, actually I didn't know that. Interesting story.









I love Einstein, actually; I'm just making feeble attempts at sarcasm/humor.
 
In addition to trying to find life outside of Earth, I think they should start thinking about seeding Earth life out there, especially if they find there is no life on the other planets. Perhaps they should take some of the hardy, extreme-conditions-living-microorganisms from this planet and seed them on places like Mars and Europa, even send them into interstellar space, like Johnny Appleseed. And, no, I don't think I care if that violates the Prime Directive.
 
@CFunk, that's really interesting, and sounds just like us (unfortunately.)

In addition to trying to find life outside of Earth, I think they should start thinking about seeding Earth life out there, especially if they find there is no life on the other planets. Perhaps they should take some of the hardy, extreme-conditions-living-microorganisms from this planet and seed them on places like Mars and Europa, even send them into interstellar space, like Johnny Appleseed. And, no, I don't think I care if that violates the Prime Directive.

Now I want to watch this episode of TNG:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqkCJvTGSEQ
 
I hate, HATE, HATE, HATE that episode of TNG. As far as I'm concerned, it never happened, and I will not accept that as part of the Star Trek canon.

This is how I feel, when I watch that episode:

:angry::rofl::bang::grrr::mad:
 
Well, that's two different subjects. True, the Germans were working on one, but the war was over before they could finish; that's all I meant.

As for dropping the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, I don't think it had anything to do with ending the war. By that point, the Japanese had already surrendered, but with one condition -- they wanted to keep their emperor. We said no, we wanted an unconditional surrender, then dropped the bombs. Japan surrendered, unconditionally, at which point we told them they could keep their emperor.

Thanks, Einstein!

As for the other bit about the near-identical spy-planes, no, actually I didn't know that. Interesting story.


I love Einstein, actually; I'm just making feeble attempts at sarcasm/humor.

Sorry bro, your gonna have to site on this one.

The A-bombs saved hundreds of thousands of American lives and even more Japanese! The Emperor vowed to fight to the LAST Japanese standing. The Abom's took 150,000 lives as opposed to the 1,000,000+ that was destined to fight. We could have invaded, but that would have cost more American, British and Russian lives.


That said, isnt this OP really old news? Seems I read this in the '80's?
 
The A-bombs saved hundreds of thousands of American lives and even more Japanese! The Emperor vowed to fight to the LAST Japanese standing. The Abom's took 150,000 lives as opposed to the 1,000,000+ that was destined to fight. We could have invaded, but that would have cost more American, British and Russian lives.

I think we might be citing different sources of information. As Ron Burgundy would say, "Agree to disagree". Or, apropos, "When in Rome". :D
 
@CFunk, that's really interesting, and sounds just like us (unfortunately.)



Now I want to watch this episode of TNG:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqkCJvTGSEQ


I hate, HATE, HATE, HATE that episode of TNG. As far as I'm concerned, it never happened, and I will not accept that as part of the Star Trek canon.

:lol:

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Sorry bro, your gonna have to site on this one.

The A-bombs saved hundreds of thousands of American lives and even more Japanese! The Emperor vowed to fight to the LAST Japanese standing. The Abom's took 150,000 lives as opposed to the 1,000,000+ that was destined to fight. We could have invaded, but that would have cost more American, British and Russian lives.


That said, isnt this OP really old news? Seems I read this in the '80's?

Oops, sorry if this is old news, Wheat. I guess I can't say that it isn't. But it is a recent show. And the scientists in the show sure seem to think it's new and groundbreaking. I hadn't heard it before, so I thought, hey, wow-za cool cool cool. But I know I haven't heard a whole lot of things before, so, there ya go.

Speaking of Nova, PBS did an outstanding biopic of him some years ago. I happened to be looking at more of Nova's online catalogue available for streaming last night and found this. I'm not absolutely sure that it's the same doc (I didn't watch it to verify that it is). But I'm pretty sure. And it looks like the whole thing can be streamed. How cool is that? Anyway, we find out, sadly, that on a personal level, he was a lousy husband and a lousy father. And that's probably too kind of a way to put it. I remember when I first saw it, names like dirtbag came to mind. On the other hand, I was probably being too judgemental.

Here it is. Very good show, as Nova usually does produce: Einstein Revealed

About the dropping of not one but two atom bombs upon Japan, I too have strong opinions. But that's a political debate (among other things!), and politics are devisive, right? So I'll simply say that I agree with Cracker. Beyond that, I better just keep my mouth shut. =/
 
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its "debatable" as is any prediction of events that did NOT occur.. so agree to disagree sounds good..

regarding the OP.. maybe I read the wrong link? :)

Its cool and fascinating regardless! And does not threaten my fundamentalist Christian beliefs in any way.
 
I hate, HATE, HATE, HATE that episode of TNG. As far as I'm concerned, it never happened, and I will not accept that as part of the Star Trek canon.

This is how I feel, when I watch that episode:

:angry::rofl::bang::grrr:

Whaaaaa? Really? It's not my favorite but it's up there.

Ok, ok, I know it's got a really low-budget feel and the guest stars were awful and didn't feel right for their respective species. But come on! Fragments of DNA coming together to express an artificially created algorithm to tell everyone that we're not so different and to get along(also a convenient explanation for the absurd idea of inter-species procreation). Plus the Romulan interaction at the end is classic Picard and TNG. It's so good!

Maybe it just suffers from being in the middle of a great group of TNG eps: Starship Mine, Ship in a Bottle, Frame of Mind, Lessons (j/k :lol:)?
 
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