Best Editing Pc for under $1,000

Ok so I plan to get the new black magic pocket cinema camera at the end of next month and my macbook pro is not going to cut it for video editing( it hardly does now for my .h264 files) So i have exactly 1,000 to spend on a desktop computer to fit my needs, id prefer a computer that is already built but i will build it myself if it would better suit my needs. Can anyone tell me or give me some options on what i will need in order to have a fast editing computer? Thanks for any help as always!
 
UPDATE

Had some car problems going to pick the computer up today gateway dx4870 8GB RAM I5 with intel graphics card, is that intel card upgradable? And what do you reccomend? HD video edting also some gaming (MMOS and minecraft) the cheapest but best card for a low price? And if assume ill need a bigger watt power supply for the card.

Ps is it hard to change the graphics card by yourself? Thanks for the help guys! You've all made this decision much easier and I understand more now
 
Ps is it hard to change the graphics card by yourself? Thanks for the help guys! You've all made this decision much easier and I understand more now

The graphics card itself is very easy; open it up and unscrew the backplate, pull it out, insert new one, screw it down. In this machines case, it's probably integrated into the MB, so there'll be nothing to take out.

The PSU is likely much harder, especially in those small cases. Make very clear notes for yourself on which plug went into where, there are a dozen or so cables coming out of the PSUs. Make damn sure the fans are all connected, or you're melt it pretty quickly. Also, a new video card will have a power plug or two of its own, which the default one (if it happens to be a card) likely won't.

CraigL
 
Yeah the default is built in the mb so there a slot behind the back plate for the new graphics card? And also why would I be worried about psu and unplugging stuff for just the graphics card? Btw if you know pcs well you think the model I'm purchasing is a good pick for the price? (600)
 
Yeah the default is built in the mb so there a slot behind the back plate for the new graphics card? And also why would I be worried about psu and unplugging stuff for just the graphics card?

Most of those boxed machines come with something in the order of a 300W supply and don't come with the plug for video cards. Most after market cards nowadays require more than that just for themselves, so they will recommend at least a 600W, and preferably a 750W supply. So, adding a card in there (one that's worth it at least) will require a larger PSU.

Btw if you know pcs well you think the model I'm purchasing is a good pick for the price? (600)

I've not bought for a while. If it's a 34XX/35XX i5, then it seems like a good price, if it's a 33XX then it's decent. Personally, I held off until I found an i7 I could afford, but I had a machine I could use while I waited. If I didn't, an i5 is a strong contender in the price/performance.

I just checked on the Gateway site, and it's a 33XX, but they also list the prices as 529 and 549... So, 600 seems high, unless the US models are different and it is a better chipset.

Those are just my thoughts on the price/performance. Contemplate them at your own risk... =)

CraigL
 
You can upgrade your cpu but it's one of the more intricate pieces of hardware to deal with because it's fragile and under so many other layers. It's a long process and if you're not comfortable building your PC in the first place then I'd advise against going down this route.
Processors are also among the most expensive parts of PCs, graphics cards being equal or sometimes more expensive.
From what people have said, I'd suggest avoiding the machine you have in mind because you can't easily add a graphics card and the "intel graphics card" is BS - it's just an integrated chip with bare minimum stats, pretty useless. Plus the PSU will most likely be junk anyway.
 
I don't know, I haven't looked into pre-built PCs for years, I built my own to save money. I researched for months before buying the components and everything was pretty straightforward thanks to that.
 
Oh damn id love to build but don't have the time no knowledge to do it. It would really be that hard to replace the gfx card on the gateway I suggested? All I'd need is a gfx card and psu doesn't seem to hard
 
I can always upgrade to i7 right? I wouldn't need to upgrade anything else with it for it to work?

I don't know how you could upgrade to an i7, it's a totally different chipset driving it, if not a completely different socket.

The prebuilt machines can be a decent price when a special is found. My i7 (also a Gateway) cost me like $800 on a Future Shop (local electronics store) special. Even with the new PSU and video card, was cheaper than I could have built. Now, building it I'd have a way better case, I was prepared to deal with it.

Go to a local computer store and show them the specs, see what they can do for you. Prices vary constantly, they will give you the best answer, they might have some components on special also.

Replacing the PSU isn't hard as such, it's just going to be a very tight squeeze in the little cases, and you need to make sure you get all the connectors right, especially the fans/cooling. I struggled like hell to get the 750W supply in my little gateway case.

CraigL
 
it would have 450 watts psu and buy a entry level graphics card

Actually, checking the specs on the Gateway site, and both 4870 models have a 300W supply. Seems that 300W is pretty typical for these branded PCs; my i7 Gateway also had only a 300W supply. And that's good for very little more than the PC comes with, hardware wise.

And for a graphics card, I'd suggest getting the best you can afford. Most video packages now offer some sort of support for GPU. I prefer AMD, but nVidia and their CUDA enjoy better support for the time being. OpenCL (works on both) is gaining rapidly though. And GPU benefit will only improve more and more as time goes on.

CraigL
 
Don't be afraid of buying 2nd hand on certain components either. For example, how often do you hear of a graphics card dying from "old age" in the same way you hear about HDDs? I got my GPU (XFX/AMD Black Edition 6850) from a friend at a fraction of the cost I would have paid otherwise. :)
Same goes for high quality fans, cases, accessories (mouse, screen) and sound cards.
 
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Before i make a final decision a friend who is going to school for computers has showed me a cart of a build he could make for me which is only 400 and its cheaper then the pre-built, i just want to get some opinions on.


Rosewill R363-M-BK Black Ultra High Gloss Finished MicroATX Computer Case with 400W ATX 2.2 12V Power Supply

MSI R4350-MD1GD3H/LP Radeon HD 4350 1GB 64-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Low Profile Video Card

AMD FX-4100 Zambezi 3.6GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) Socket AM3+ 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor FD4100WMGUSBX

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Desktop Memory Model F3-8500CL7D-8GBRL

Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive

LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 - OEM

D-Link DWA-552 32-bit PCI Xtreme Desktop Adapter

total is 397.42 and i still need to select a mother board. sound like a good build?
 
It could do with a slightly better CPU and GPU (processor and graphics card). Since you're saving money anyway you might as well add $50 to $80 more for each of those and get a:
AMD FX-8350 Eight-Core @ $180 (your build was at around $110)
and
Radeon HD 7750 graphics card @ $90 (your build was at around $40-$50) BONUS: This card doesn't use any extra cables.

I suggest both of these because that CPU you have there won't get the job done and that GPU, quite simply, is a waste of space on today's market. The graphics card I suggested still might not be enough though. Up to you to judge.
Add an Asus or Gigabyte motherboard (Mobo) and it should bring it up to $600, but this way you'll have a better PC than the shop-built one!
 
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