Why do you make films?

Hey richy, that's interesting. Can I ask then why you come to these forums? (out of curiosity)

Is it because you just like the community, or watching the films people here make? Or is it because you want to pursue animation a little more, like you said?

I dunno. :)

What have you been up to so far when it comes to filmmaking, roethatboat? What aspects have you been involved in? What are your goals?
 
I dunno. :)

What have you been up to so far when it comes to filmmaking, roethatboat? What aspects have you been involved in? What are your goals?

I only just took up the hobby :) I've done a lot of writing beforehand, so I've dabbled in screenplays, but as far as camerawork and all that, I'm an absolute beginner.

I'd like to do a few short films and some documentaries to get experience with the camera, and editing, and distribution :) then I'll go from there
 
I want to be filthy-stinking-rich. Like, I want a harem of beautiful ladies feeding me grapes and fanning me with palm fronds.

I also love filmmaking.
 
For the sheer joy of creation. I was exposed to the films of Don Bluth and Jim Henson at a young age and I knew then that that was what I wanted to do. There are a lot of directors and films that have had an influence on me over the years, but those two guys are the big ones.
 
I make films to see the world as it appears in my imagination. But sometimes my life is more cool than cinema, and that times I feel good and don't need to create movies.:lol:
However I think that it's necessary (to me, at least) to be deeply unhappy to create movies.
 
I tend to have a various amount of hobbies that I get extremely passionate about with a lot of concentration for about a month. After that, I tend to lose interest and focus my attention on a new hobby that is interesting to me. In about March of this year I became interested in how to create a cinematic look and why a lot of videos look amateurish. I found out that film making involves a great many talents, so I have been deep diving into each area to learn about how it's done.

Also, I'm a programmer by trade, so I need a creative outlet. It also ties in well with a lot of my previous hobbies such as song writing, recording, creative writing, 3d modeling etc.
 
I don't technically make films anymore. I used to wear all the hats (write, direct, DP, edit etc).
I started because in primary school a teacher saw that I was good and so taught me how to do video editing, which I then began with my friends. Working together to create something that somebody else enjoyed was always satisfying. I've always loved creative writing, and films as a medium attract me quite a lot, so creativity has always been an interest of mine.

These days I am a cinematographer (and a camera assistant, gaffer or best boy on larger productions) and the experiences I gain on set are at the peak of my own personal satisfaction. The relationships you have on set, adjusting a light and looking in the frame and everybody saying they like the shot, the rush of completing extremely difficult shots that are complex in focus or in movement or in a tight space.

While I am not yet at a point where I am living off it, I literally cannot see myself working any other job. For years, since about age 15 I've known this is all I can do, and I just have to keep working until I really get there. Of course ultimate goals could consist of 'Hollywood and all it's glory', but I'm really not aiming for that; the relationships and experiences you gain every day while simply earning enough for a living (and potentially support a future family) are all my goals need to really desire. Of course every goal you achieve you'll always be looking at the next greatest thing you can do.

Making films, watching films (or TV; stories) is at the peak of my satisfaction levels. :)
 
So you work cinematography on big budget movies and still can't live on that? To me, that is just so discouraging. I don't know much about the film industry business, but is it that a few people make tons of money while everyone else makes pennies?
 
So you work cinematography on big budget movies and still can't live on that? To me, that is just so discouraging. I don't know much about the film industry business, but is it that a few people make tons of money while everyone else makes pennies?

No no, I've really only just entered the industry. Mostly do small incorporate gigs, short films and student films. I almost can live off that and I've literally only just entered it. In 3 or 4 years I'll be fine. And I'm still studying FYI.
 
..............but is it that a few people make tons of money while everyone else makes pennies?

That's called 'winner takes it all economics'.
In some cases that can be the reality of life.
Actually, in a lot of cases that is applied.
But luckily not always :)
 
Sure, a CEO may take a 9 million dollar paycheck (Apple) while their developers make 90k. But really, 90k isn't a bad salary. I was saying pennies to where you can't live off the wages like minimum wages. And before you guys say lots of people make minimum wage, I would argue most of those jobs are skill less jobs. Film making obviously takes lots of skill.

Wow, that escalated quickly. I'm not trying to derail this thread, I was just generally surprised that you can gigs in cinematography and not make enough money to live on.
 
I was just generally surprised that you can gigs in cinematography and not make enough money to live on.

It can also depend on how many gigs you get. You may get a decent daily rate, but what does that matter if you only work 20 or 30 days out of the year?
 
Wow, that escalated quickly. I'm not trying to derail this thread, I was just generally surprised that you can gigs in cinematography and not make enough money to live on.

Yeah but as I said I'm only getting 2 or 3 days a fortnight at the moment (that are paid). I've really only just entered the paying game, a lot of the work I did last year and in the years before was voluntary. (due to high school). This is because I am still in the very indie/student crowd where there isn't really much money going around for anybody anyway. And some of the paying gigs are different levels as well, some they hire my equipment and me, some I'm told a rate and I just rock up, it's all variable anyway.
 

directorik

IndieTalk's Resident Guru
So you work cinematography on big budget movies and still can't live on that? To me, that is just so discouraging. I don't know much about the film industry business, but is it that a few people make tons of money while everyone else makes pennies?
Freelancing is tough. And it's not for everyone. I've been a freelancer
my entire career - even my "permanent" job (for Disney) is on a project
by project basis. I make an excellent day rate as a camera operator. If
I worked steady, five days a week all year I'd be close to the "ton of
money" side. I make Guild wages for writing - if I worked steady, five
days a week all year I'd be close to the "ton of money" side. But I
don't work that way. When I'm honest with myself I don't want to work
that way. I love what I do. Even when I'm between jobs for 3 to 5 months.

Most people in the business (film, TV, theater, new media) are freelancers.
 
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