Which is better Audacity or HitFilm? - Sound editing

Personally, I think sound is more important than picture quality. (I can’t understand why people always think the other way around.) And there I got a question. Which is better for sound editing audacity or HitFilm Express?
 
One thing I'd suggest for using Reaper to mix films- suck it up and buy the Vordio application. It will allow you to bring an XML edit into Reaper just like going from Media Composer to Pro Tools. All your cuts remain intact. I briefly played with the demo version and it worked flawless.
 
PoorTools? Yeesh...

Look, Reaper may work fine for some. HitFilm may work fine for some. The thing is, those are perfectly fine if you’re doing your own thing in your own workspace. The minute you want to work collaboratively with other creators, you’re already hindered unless they’re on the exact same system.

There’s a reason ProTools is a standard in the industry. It’s powerful and it talks to other projects through standardized file transfer formats from Avid, Premiere, and (with a plug-in) FCPX. HitFilm cannot do that. Reaper requires a couple of workarounds to pull in those projects - whether it’s Vordio or AATranslator - but can it send those same projects out to other (non-Reaper) users?

We’ve gotten way beyond anything that Future_Screen is ever going to need. Lots of this info can be useful for others reading this thread, but to the OP:

Keep it simple. You still cannot get a screenplay started, much less finished. What audio work do you really need to do at this point? You’re editing in HitFilm (are you editing anything?!). Use Audacity to treat sound as needed and call it a day. Learn from that experience. When - and if - you get into a bigger project with more complex needs, then you can look at something better.
 
One thing I'd suggest for using Reaper to mix films- suck it up and buy the Vordio application. It will allow you to bring an XML edit into Reaper just like going from Media Composer to Pro Tools. All your cuts remain intact. I briefly played with the demo version and it worked flawless.

That looks like a nice app. I'd get it, but I'm already doing this with AATranslator, so no need for me. If I didn't have AAT, I'd definitely be looking at Vordio.
 
PoorTools? Yeesh...

Look, Reaper may work fine for some. HitFilm may work fine for some. The thing is, those are perfectly fine if you’re doing your own thing in your own workspace. The minute you want to work collaboratively with other creators, you’re already hindered unless they’re on the exact same system.

This is 100% true, but it all really depends at what level you're working at. If you're not getting paid, and collaborating with other people in the same boat... you're (IME) just as likely to be working in a studio running REAPER, or any number of other DAWs, as you are Pro-Tools. In fact, in the last 10 years, PT's market share outside of "real" studios has fallen hard. I know what you're saying though. At the serious, professional level, it's PT all the way.

Also, just wanted to add that PT isn't even a bad DAW, it's just that their constant updates and up-sell pricing schemes will make you poor. Unless you've got some really nice, steady, financially secure clients. :thumbsup:
 
You know, first you have to WRITE something. Until you've done that everything else is completely moot.

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You are also falling into the Indie Control Freak Trap; you feel that you have to do everything yourself. Filmmaking is a TEAM SPORT. You must relinquish control of many aspects of your projects if you ever want them completed in a reasonable amount of time. To the best of my knowledge you haven't even written a single completed script. If you can't do that, what in Bogs name makes you thing that you can do a proper preproduction, compile a budget, run a camera, light a set, use a sound kit, direct actors, edit the visuals, compose a score and do an audio post (DX editing, Foley, Sound FX, music editing & mixing)?

There's just too much to know. When I migrated from music engineering to audio post it took me a year to feel like a I had a complete grasp of the process, much less felt that I was competent - and I had 25+ years of audio experience going in!

Take human bites. Write a complete script. Then write a dozen more. After that then you can ask about how to shoot one of them.
 
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"Fix it in post" applies to audio as well as picture. You should not have annoying sounds on your audio. That's when you cut and retake, or you eliminate the noise (air conditioner, baby crying etc.) on set. Shit in shit out. NOTHING is going to clean up poorly recorded audio. Do it right on set.

Nothing except me. Although I am a professional, corporate film maker, occasionally I get paid for a sound cleanup.

Depends on how what it is. Sometimes, it is salvageable... for a price.
 
First, a dedicated audio editing app is ALWAYS better for editing audio than a dedicated video editing app or compositing app. That’s just... logical. Just like a screwdriver is always better than a hammer for sinking a screw.

Whilst true, I disagree mostly when it comes to software like Audacity. Personally I’d rather use Resolve (which also happens to be free) than Audacity. I’d prefer to use Media Composer or FCPXs audio tools than Audacity. They’re not necessarily anything special (though they’re certainly not bad) and I’d always prefer to do an audio edit and mix in Pro Tools, but if it was Media Composer/FCPX or Audacity... I’d go for the video app...
 
Neither of those two are proper hardcore DAWs for audio.

No professional specialist would use either for audio.

So as much as I like HitFilm I would have to say *no* to that! (I even run a forum for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/426174967509293/ )

Instead go for one of these two:

1) Pro Tools, if this is your planned career path and you need to work with others on a post sound team

2) Reaper if you're a serious hobbyist or someone who'll mainly be doing the sound solo by yourself rather than part of a wider large post sound department, as Reaper is a greater priced, powerful, and modern DAW.

https://www.reaper.fm
 
One thing I'd suggest for using Reaper to mix films- suck it up and buy the Vordio application. It will allow you to bring an XML edit into Reaper just like going from Media Composer to Pro Tools. All your cuts remain intact. I briefly played with the demo version and it worked flawless.

AATranslator is a very good option as well, better than Vordio for many users.

http://www.aatranslator.com.au

Ideally, get both!
 
Neither of those two are proper hardcore DAWs for audio.

No professional specialist would use either for audio.

So as much as I like HitFilm I would have to say *no* to that! (I even run a forum for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/426174967509293/ )

Instead go for one of these two:

1) Pro Tools, if this is your planned career path and you need to work with others on a post sound team

2) Reaper if you're a serious hobbyist or someone who'll mainly be doing the sound solo by yourself rather than part of a wider large post sound department, as Reaper is a greater priced, powerful, and modern DAW.

https://www.reaper.fm

Audacity is an app best for no-budgets and amateurs to do select surgery on idividual clips.

But if you pay attention to the OP and her post history so far... ProTools and Reaper are WAY above the point where we are and are just going to confuse things. That’s why, at this point, it’s better for Future_Screen simply to finish writing something - anything - and try to make it on basic tools rather than getting into anything even remotely complex.

Just because PT is “the best” for industrial use, does not mean that it’s the best for an inexperienced individual user under her particular set of circumstances. And to that, I say go with HitFilm and Audacity and see where it takes her... if she can even finish a screenplay, and if she can even see it to completion.
 
Audacity is more a simple audio editor rather than a full blown DAW. So I wouldn't recommend it.

But yeah, if we take into OP's posting history then I'd say probably just stick with whatever audio editing tools your NLE already gives you.

True, though Vordio is like half the cost of AATranslator. A bit more modern UI too.

Yup, but AATranslator has more capabilities in conversion types. Each have their pros and cons.
 
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Really? Then why are you comparing an audio editing program to a compositing and 3D model editing program? Compare HitFilm Pro to After Effects, not Audacity.

For Audiacity compare it to Protools, Audition, and Sound Forge Pro.

I am thnking, the original poster doesn't want to invest money to make great audio. There are some people in this world who honestly believe cheaper or no cost is the best choice. They don't understand you get what you pay for all too often.

However, the real thing the poster must be honest with themselves with is, if sound really is as important to them as they originally posted, how much is sound worth to the poster--financially. You have to come up with the money.

I am in a financial situation where I cannot afford studio equipment and experience. As some people say on FaceBook very wisely, the only one to compete with is oneself. Do the best one can for their own situation. For audio, I can't afford Protools. I have Sound Forge Pro. And, it works for me. I can fix audio much more with it than with a NLE. It cannot do everything Protools can. But, it fits my needs. Works for me with Final Cut Pro. It may not have plugins for FCPX. But, I can work around that by saving the audio I create with Sound Forge Pro as AIFF files and import the audio into Final Cut Pro and place them where I need them on the timeline. I don't make music. I edit sound effects, VOs, and dialogue with it. I work with a music composer who uses Protools. At the end of the day, the poster has to make up their own mind. But, I recommend trying to raise some cash where it is possible to even buy and older version of an audio editor from Ebay or Amazon. I saved 50% on the cost of Roxio Titanium Toast for my Mac buying a last year's version from Amazon. I don't need the latest version for Blu-rays and DVD creation with my Blu-ray burner.

This is just an example of ways to save money with software. I have the free version of Wave Pad Audio Editor from the Apple Store. However, I can't save files with the free version. I have to pay $100 to get the upgrade to save audio files.

My two cents is compete with yourself. But, know the shortcomings of free software.
 
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