Video editing software that imports Pro Res

All on my C drive.
Well, there’s your other problem. Never, ever, ever store your video media on your boot drive. The drive has to do way too much work when it has to run the OS, run the NLE, and read, process, and render the video all at the same time. There comes a point where the drive just decides it’s too much and the app goes down.

Get an external drive on the fastest bus you have (ideally USB3 or Thunderbolt). Make sure the drive spins at 7200rpm. Use that for all of your video media, render files, etc.
 
Get an external drive on the fastest bus you have (ideally USB3 or Thunderbolt). Make sure the drive spins at 7200rpm. Use that for all of your video media, render files, etc.
Maybe just adding a second drive inside the machine via a SATA port? Might need to add a fan inside too.
I just bought this PC about 6 months ago. Dell XPS 8930
 
Maybe just adding a second drive inside the machine via a SATA port? Might need to add a fan inside too.
I just bought this PC about 6 months ago. Dell XPS 8930
Even better. Just get a large drive (7200rpm if you can) and use it to keep your video media separate.
 

WalterB

Member
Always seperate OS from footage. Even better if you have a seperate disk for previews as well.

And read the BMD manual for system specs for resolve.
Otherwise you might just stumble from problem to problem.

In the end the software is still free, but you need hardware as well ;)
 
Just playing a clip, working with it in the timeline, etc is basically accessing a video file, just as adjusting it's color properties. Seems strange that adjusting the color would suddenly cause it not to be able to "catch up with" or keep pace the editing program.
 
Just playing a clip, working with it in the timeline, etc is basically accessing a video file, just as adjusting it's color properties. Seems strange that adjusting the color would suddenly cause it not to be able to "catch up with" or keep pace the editing program.
And the bigger the video file, the more data it has to deal with. Adjusting the color writes (or rewrites) a new render file from which to play. And moving all your video to a secondary drive will likely also improve the rendering time for you in AE.

Further, how full is your C drive? If it’s past 80% full, it can slow down your computer even more. Keeping your media there can fill it up fast.

As far back as computer-based editing has existed it has always been best practice to keep your media on a separate drive. Now, we’re dealing with HD, 2k, 4k... much larger files. Yes, you’re accessing a file, but it’s a video file and not something simple like a Word file. It’s not even a still image. It’s a large, processor-intensive video file. Especially in a codec like ProRes.
 
Hooked up the secondary drive, re-linked clips in my timeline to the clips on the secondary drive, cranked up the blue color, then I tried to tweek the contrast. It froze up for a about 4 seconds then the program crashed. I'm convinced that I just have to do any color correcting in After Effects then import to Resolve. AE can do a lot of fancy stuff with multiple layers that Resolve can't do anyway.
 

jax_rox

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Resolve is ultimately more powerful than AE for grading, but it is a very different way of working as it uses nodes instead of layers.

I’ve not used Windows PCs for over 10 years, and I don’t have any crashing issues with Resolve on my computers (iMacs & Macbook Pros), so it’s possible it’s more of a ‘windows thing’. Have you tried non-Pro Res source material? As Pro Res is not native to Windows there may be a struggle with trying to constantly re-render changes to a non-native format, particularly in your CPU. Have you tried creating proxies to work/edit from?

I’m not sure what you mean exactly when you talk about contrast. Are you trying to adjust the curves?
 
Resolve is ultimately more powerful than AE for grading, but it is a very different way of working as it uses nodes instead of layers.

I’ve not used Windows PCs for over 10 years, and I don’t have any crashing issues with Resolve on my computers (iMacs & Macbook Pros), so it’s possible it’s more of a ‘windows thing’. Have you tried non-Pro Res source material? As Pro Res is not native to Windows there may be a struggle with trying to constantly re-render changes to a non-native format, particularly in your CPU. Have you tried creating proxies to work/edit from?

I’m not sure what you mean exactly when you talk about contrast. Are you trying to adjust the curves?
I'm using all kinds of clips from VideoBlocks. QuickTime, AVI, etc. It wasn't a ProRes clip that I was tweeking when it crashed.

Proxy server?

In AE it's called "contrast". In Resolve I forget what it's called.
 

jax_rox

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
By proxies, I mean transcoding your original files to smaller, easier to use, generally lower quality files that will allow you to do your offline edit with speed. Then you re-link in the online (I.e. grade and final output).
 
The simplest solution is for you to get a format converter, and convert your files into a format that your editor can ingest. I use a PRISM format converter that is available for free trial. It's at https://www.nchsoftware.com/prism/index.html When your "free trial" expires, simply download the prism again. I've been using it for ten years and still haven't bought one. I think a free trial lasts about a week.
 

Top