Sensor size vs. Color depth bit

Milad

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Hello all,

I'm preparing a documentary film to be shot in Antarctica. 1-2 man crew, very small.

My choices of the camera (considering the budget) are down to Sony A7 ii and Panasonic GH5S. I know they are different and cameras and both have strong and weak points. But my question is focused on one thing:

Which is more important in order to have a good 4K image that could be shown in DCP on the big screen?:

the bigger sensor ([24 MP Full frame (35.8 x 23.9 mm) CMOS Sensor] VS. [10 MP Four Thirds (17.3 x 13 mm) CMOS Sensor] or, more color depth (and dymanic range?) information ([4:2:2 10 bit] VS. [4:2:0 8bit])?

Thanks in advance,

Milad
 
I’ll take better color science and dynamic range any day. I prefer color from Panasonic over Sony (and Canon above those). But an icy and snowy environment will be pretty contrasty and that’s where higher dynamic range is going to be your best friend. On that level, have you considered the BMPCC 4K? Color science is decent, but DR is great. It’s backordered but I do hear of some folks getting their orders within a couple of weeks.

You’re going to be in Antarctica? You also need to check up on operating stability in extreme temperatures. I have no clue what that means for these two cameras.

And pack lots of hand warmers to keep in and around your camera and other gear.
 

jax_rox

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Both. But also neither. All things bring equal, colour and bit depth will be of benefit however in this particular case all things aren’t equal.

I’d go with the most appropriate for the project. Are you going to be shooting in low light situations? You’ll get more mileage from the Sony. Do you need to shoot vast, wide sweeping shots? You’ll probably find it easier on the Sony. Will you need to grade the crap out of it later? The Panasonic might then be the best bet.

Especially with a documentary, at this budget level I’d focus more on the practicalities of each camera. They’re both going to give you comparable 4K pictures.
 

Milad

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Thanks for your input.
BMPCC seems a bit too fancy for that ambient. Also fixed LCD is a deal breaker.
hand warmers a necessity, thanks.
 

Milad

Must post a Welcome thread before access is granted
I’ll take better color science and dynamic range any day. I prefer color from Panasonic over Sony (and Canon above those). But an icy and snowy environment will be pretty contrasty and that’s where higher dynamic range is going to be your best friend. On that level, have you considered the BMPCC 4K? Color science is decent, but DR is great. It’s backordered but I do hear of some folks getting their orders within a couple of weeks.

You’re going to be in Antarctica? You also need to check up on operating stability in extreme temperatures. I have no clue what that means for these two cameras.

And pack lots of hand warmers to keep in and around your camera and other gear.
Thanks for your input.
BMPCC seems a bit too fancy for that ambient. Also fixed LCD is a deal breaker.
hand warmers a necessity, thanks.
 

Milad

Must post a Welcome thread before access is granted
Both. But also neither. All things bring equal, colour and bit depth will be of benefit however in this particular case all things aren’t equal.

I’d go with the most appropriate for the project. Are you going to be shooting in low light situations? You’ll get more mileage from the Sony. Do you need to shoot vast, wide sweeping shots? You’ll probably find it easier on the Sony. Will you need to grade the crap out of it later? The Panasonic might then be the best bet.

Especially with a documentary, at this budget level I’d focus more on the practicalities of each camera. They’re both going to give you comparable 4K pictures.
Thanks for your message.
I will be staying more than a month in a scientific base. So I guess there will be a lot of low light interiors and vast icey exterior landscapes. 14 hours of day light at least. Why do you say Sony is better for the landscaspes? because of the larger sensor?
Funny thing is that it will probably be black and white, so color depth and dynamic range will have a particular use.
So I wouldn't think to push it too much in the post for color stuff, but to use the 10 bit to adjust some exposure imprecisions.
 

jax_rox

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The Sony sensor is double the size of the Panasonic, which means that not only is there a lot more light the sensor can capture, but you will be able to get significantly wider significantly easier.

But both are extremely capable of giving you a great image.
 

Milad

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The Sony sensor is double the size of the Panasonic, which means that not only is there a lot more light the sensor can capture, but you will be able to get significantly wider significantly easier.

But both are extremely capable of giving you a great image.
Thanks for your input.
 

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