How can I achieve this special effect?

I was told before on here not to go, as you don't learn anything that you cannot learn on your own. But then there are others who say that is not true and you learn a lot and make a lot of useful connections. In order to go, I would have to mortgage my place, and am considering it. Should I? Is it worth it? I will have to move back in with my parents for quite a few years at least, if I do, and I will have a lot less money for my own projects, so is film school worth it, to learn the fields in a more thorough way?
 
I was told before on here not to go, as you don't learn anything that you cannot learn on your own. But then there are others who say that is not true and you learn a lot and make a lot of useful connections. In order to go, I would have to mortgage my place, and am considering it. Should I? Is it worth it? I will have to move back in with my parents for quite a few years at least, if I do, and I will have a lot less money for my own projects, so is film school worth it, to learn the fields in a more thorough way?

It's really up to you to decide if film school is worth it or not. I've yet to meet a peer here that regrets putting their education in the hands of those in the industry.

But this industry doesn't require a degree, you CAN learn most of it online, and what you can't can be learned on set. However, some people can't learn online, they need hands on education.
 
In order to go, I would have to mortgage my place, and am considering it. Should I?

no. you prove, time and time again (often within the same thread), that you are incapable of taking advice and putting it to use. you are incapable of listening and even further incapable of applying knowledge.
 
I know a degree will not do anything, but perhaps I need hands on education. I tried learning a lot from Lynda.com, like I was told to, but I feel that those tutorials do leave a lot out. Vancouver film school costs $50,000 for the acting course alone. That is a lot and don't know if I can afford to take so much in the school to wear the hats. Each course is at least a year, so if I learn, directing, and sound design, that would be a lot of money. A fellow actor I know who is taking Vancouver Film school, says that it's worth it, and you learn a lot of the marketing side of filmmaking, which is the most important. But she is just learning the marketing and acting only, so I wonder if it's worth it for other fields other than those to.

Perhaps I could buy a place near Vancouver to live, and see what the filmmaking there is like and what they have to offer, before I decide on school. She says that I am in the wrong city, since she use to live here, and there are movies being made there every month you can get hands on experience with.

If I am incapable of putting advice to use, perhaps I just need to change my way of thinking. I often complain about not being able to put certain pieces of advice to use, because there is a problem that prevents it, or I feel it cannot help my situation cause of certain obstacles. Perhaps I just need to think outside the box more and come up with my own solution, rather than relying on "rules". Perhaps I should try to apply other people's advice more, even if there obstacles preventing it, in my situations. So what if there are obstacles, do it anyway and see what happens, and think positive. Perhaps I need to develop an attitude like that.
 
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I feel like you guys spend years, thinking you need to "master" something. What could possibly be so hard? Watch some videos, get some equipment, and make a goddamn movie. Why would you waste years not making something? (this doesn't necessarily apply to you harmonica, since I don't really know your situation or what you do, just saying)
 
I feel like you guys spend years, thinking you need to "master" something.
We don't spend years thinking we need to master something, we spend years mastering it. What you're saying is exactly what the rest of us are saying: just DO IT. make SOMETHING. then make SOMETHING ELSE. repeat a hundred times and you've got your mastery, on top of a bunch of portfolio work with which you can get gigs

Why would you waste years not making something?
you just described, with perfect accuracy, H44's modus operandi
 
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Okay thanks. I have been having trouble making something cause I have had people told me I am not ready yet and they pull out of my projects. A DP even told me I am not ready yet and need to learn before I jump in head first and make something. I told him that it was just a no budget short, and I am making it for a learning experience, and we do not need to hire expensive post production people to work on it, cause it's a learning experience, and he just looked appalled and dropped out because of that.

But I will keep looking for more people and attempt to make something. If I build a portfolio of work to get gigs, do I need to hire pro sound designers in post, since I want to concentrate mainly on directing? Or are those sound designers required to make a good impression with people even if the short films are just for practice, before mastering?
 
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Is their anything I can do to improve in that area, so I can get people to work with me off the ground?
Stop trying to write, produce, direct, etc.

Take some time off from trying to manage your own projects, and just go be a PA on other people's projects. You will learn more ON SET faster than any other way. Especially if it's not YOUR set, so that you can just focus on doing what people need you to do, and paying attention to what's being done around you.

You've been busy trying to run a marathon, and haven't bothered learning to crawl.
 
Okay thanks. I have been working on other peoples sets two for the past few years. I feel I haven't learned enough and I need to learn more. I was even told on her to get out of other people's projects, three times, because they didn't know what they were doing, and it was going to come back and make me look bad. I was literally told to get out of those. So because of that, I felt I wasn't learning enough on other people's and that I had to do something for myself.

I have another project, a TV pilot episode, of someone else's, next month. I am recording the audio. I will concentrate on that one.
 
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/end popcorn

I would like to learn the multiple roles though.

You are incapable of learning a single role. What seriously makes you think you can learn multiples?

I was told before on here not to go, as you don't learn anything that you cannot learn on your own.

This is another case of you misquoting me. I SAID, "You're an idiot, you never learn".

If I am incapable of putting advice to use, perhaps I just need to change my way of thinking.

You need to listen. You need to think. You need to problem solve. Unfortunately you don't do any of it.

I often complain about not being able to put certain pieces of advice to use, because there is a problem that prevents it, or I feel it cannot help my situation cause of certain obstacles.

Let me rephrase you, "I make excuses which is better than making movies."

This is why you shouldn't direct. Successful directors have a burning desire to finish their story no matter what impassible obstacles pop up. You're the opposite. Even the smallest of obstacles force you to turn tails and head home. Hell, the amount of times you've given up on a project which could have been solved with a quick google search by anyone with an IQ high enough to breathe is longer than most directors credits at the end of their career. Any job that involved problem solving is well beyond you.

Perhaps I should try to apply other people's advice more, even if there obstacles preventing it, in my situations. So what if there are obstacles, do it anyway and see what happens, and think positive. Perhaps I need to develop an attitude like that.

Isn't it obvious? I'm a positive person. I NEVER EVER put people down. I always lift them up to their potential. You're my exception. For some reason you make my blood boil. You lie, you're an idiot, you have no common sense and you're an askhole (Yes, an askhole). If you were trapped in a wet paper bag, I doubt you'd find your way out. I don't see a chance on this green earth that your directing dream will ever become a reality. It's just not part of your future.

I do not have enough knowledge of filmmaking yet

If after more than 3 years you don't possess enough knowledge to put together a single short, scene, shot... hell... even a screen grab, you're probably at the point where you seriously need to find something else to do. Stop wasting your life trolling the internet and for the life of me, can you stop posting your lame ass excuses. I don't want other filmmakers thinking it's ok to make excuses instead of making movies.
 
Okay well I have a script right now, and I want to shoot it. As of now, I do not have a DP or PSM, but I want to do it anyway, and forget all obstacles. I am going to set up the camera but not be behind it. I am going to act in front of it with another actor, and do ADR after. I am not going to let any lack of crew get in the way.

However, I do not want the other actor to become discouraged by no one actually being behind the camera, or having to do ADR after. The last time I tried to get actors to do ADR cause no PSM showed up, they became discouraged by it, and I do not want that to happen. I will try my best to tell her it's okay and it's worth making a movie with obstacles, rather than not making one at all. hopefully she will do it.
 
/end popcorn



You are incapable of learning a single role. What seriously makes you think you can learn multiples?



This is another case of you misquoting me. I SAID, "You're an idiot, you never learn".



You need to listen. You need to think. You need to problem solve. Unfortunately you don't do any of it.



Let me rephrase you, "I make excuses which is better than making movies."

This is why you shouldn't direct. Successful directors have a burning desire to finish their story no matter what impassible obstacles pop up. You're the opposite. Even the smallest of obstacles force you to turn tails and head home. Hell, the amount of times you've given up on a project which could have been solved with a quick google search by anyone with an IQ high enough to breathe is longer than most directors credits at the end of their career. Any job that involved problem solving is well beyond you.



Isn't it obvious? I'm a positive person. I NEVER EVER put people down. I always lift them up to their potential. You're my exception. For some reason you make my blood boil. You lie, you're an idiot, you have no common sense and you're an askhole (Yes, an askhole). If you were trapped in a wet paper bag, I doubt you'd find your way out. I don't see a chance on this green earth that your directing dream will ever become a reality. It's just not part of your future.



If after more than 3 years you don't possess enough knowledge to put together a single short, scene, shot... hell... even a screen grab, you're probably at the point where you seriously need to find something else to do. Stop wasting your life trolling the internet and for the life of me, can you stop posting your lame ass excuses. I don't want other filmmakers thinking it's ok to make excuses instead of making movies.

:clap:
 
I will try my best to tell her it's okay and it's worth making a movie with obstacles, rather than not making one at all

That's not entirely true.. if you're going to half-ass it, it's probably better not making it at all.

A complete lack of crew, isn't really what most people would call an "obstacle"

Filmmaking is all about creatively solving problems, but it's also a largely collaborative process, and really requires many different pieces to work well.

So you're going to set up a camera, and then act in front of it with another actor. Nobody behind camera.. fine, whatever. What are you going to do for lighting? Anything? What's the point of making this thing, other than just because you "really want to"?

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing right. You seem more preoccupied with just trying to do (EVERYTHING) rather than trying to do (ANYTHING) right.
 
Well I want to do it to gain experience, cause I am not DOING enough. I was thinking of using some 1000 watt halogen lights on stands. And I was told not to let obstacles get in the way, unless a course that's too much of an obstacle.
 
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Don't act if nobody handles the camera.
Don't ADR, because that will only be another excuse not to finish it.

I gave you this idea 1,5 years ago.
It can be even be done without recording dialogue, if that is a problem, but it shouldn't be problem if you use a c-stand to put the mic on it.

Another simple idea H44 did nothing with:
3 actors (or 2)
3 locations (max)
Most part: woman walking sad on the streets/a long the water/highway. Sad music in the score.
Flashback: in a fight with (ex)boyfriend (not a fight scene! maybe just 1 slab, besides smashing stuff and yelling in a living room: cold be your place!)
She starts crying (as she walks outside).
In the end someone says something that lifts her spirit. Or she drowns herself (depending on your mood then you need only 2 actors) or jumps from a bridge. (No need to show the drop! Suggest things!)

Length: 2-4 minutes. Shorter is better, but too short will lack time to convey the emotions to the public.
Writing: 1 day
Storyboarding: few hours only, but scout your locations.
Shooting: 1 day (or 2 or 3 days during magic hour)
Edit: 2 days

Style: you decide. (I'd go for handheld argument in living room, (mostly) tripod on the streets searching for poetic, desolate compositions that make her small combining with close ups that can be out of focus sometimes: keep it calm when shooting handheld.)

Result: moody video in portfolio. And more experience.

This sad girl story can be seen as an exercise in atmosphere.
You just bump right into the story after one beautiful shot without any person in it. The music already starts, maybe even before the fade in (? just making it up as i type) to create the sad atmosphere. While she wonders around real sad (near the sea or a river) you can either show a flashback of a fight or just use audiofragments (just made that up as well) as if she is still hearing that angry voice saying terrible things to her.
As a conclusion you can let her jump in the river (sad ending), walk into the sea/river and let her dissappear (sad ending with a mild magical touch) or you let a passerby (is that a real word?) give her a napkin and tell her it will be alright (a hopeful end). And then show the title (you will have to make it up, depending on the ending, the location, story). You could look at it as if it's a long commercial without selling anything where the title is part of the payoff.
Remember, it has to be short, so there's no need for a complicated plot.
You just want to convey an emotion through action and beautiful shots. (And you want something nice and finished for your portfolio :P )

I will help you little more:

It's the end of the day.
The sun is low.
A girl wonders outside.
She is sad and cold.
The wind plays with her hair. The low sun sets it 'aflame'. Lensflares.
Her arms crossed as if she is tryng to hug herself.
Close up: she cries.

Flashback: fight with (ex)boyfriend (or whatever)

Ending:
version 1:
close up: she looks down, cries and looks up.
Shot of a lake, river or bridge.
Walks into the water to dissappear. Only refection of sunset remains and goes out of focus to show title and credits.
(Or walks onto the bridge to jump. Don't show the jump.)

Version 2:
She cries, looks down.
Suddenly a voice sounds: "Are you alright?"
She looks up.
A stranger gives her a handkerchief to dry her tears.

..................

So:
no acting by you
no stunts
no special effects
no hiring of locations
no shooting at night

you just need to scout your locations, find the right music (or composer) and use some creativity (because there is still room to add things to this very baic script. Or you don't and keep it this simple.)

DO SOMETHING
 
Why are you so harsh people? He's reaching out for help. Give him a break, come on.

.....................

Well, it started in 2011... and it looked promising...

I am shooting a suspense thriller short film and there is a psycho femme fatale character. Now in most movies them female villain who uses sex as a weapon is a good looking, thin to average sized woman. I don't have a lot of actresses to pick from and don't wanna hire on beauty or body size mainly, because that would be kinda shallow really. I wanna hire based on acting skill. So does it matter if the femme fatale is not good looking, or is over weight to most mature audiences? I want to send this into film festivals to get my foot in the door as a newcomer director. Therefore, I want to make the right casting call that most critics will get the right tone from, and not feel that that the casting choice takes them out of the story, or gets any unintentional laughs. So can a unconventional choice pull it off, and make it different? Thanks.

Although H44 worked on different things, we hardly saw anything else than 5 second selfies and excuses why he can't do something.

He has been given a few thousand breaks.

Do an advanced search for threads he started and you'll see how he got to thousands of posts.

BTW, welcome to IT!
We do try to help everyone, even H44.
He just has a mental blockade:
he can't be creative and ponders instead of does.
Add a rigid worldview where every 'rule' is cast in stone and there is no way to find an alternative for anything.
The reluctance to do something doesn't help either, leaving him in catch22, since he needs to do things to get experience.
 
These are good points. Perhaps I have been trying to learn everything too fast. Perhaps I should take a break from the filmmaking community where I live. .........

If I take maybe 10 years off to learn everything, including writing, camera work, audio, vfx, make up, etc, do you think that would be enough time?..............But I will try my best not to cut corners.

Don't you see the paradox?
Taking a break from the filmmaking community won't help you to get those skills.

And then after 10 years you won't feel ready either, because you can't master everything.
Actually you can't master anything without doing.

Do you think you can master karate or soccer by reading?
Do you think you can master painting by only watching Bob Ross?
(Well, by watching you can at least learn that there are no mistakes, just happy accidents and you can improvise to work around the 'problem'.)

You need to DO.
Not a half year from now, because you have to book a venue for castings.
No.
You need to DO NOW.

This means:
work out a simple idea (I just presented one again), so it's ready to shoot.
Cast and recruit (2 or 3 actors, 1 person for sound is enough, although an assistant can be nice to carry stuff, take notes or keep an eye on traffic when shooting outside.

Go. do. it.

ACTION!
 
Okay thanks. The script I wrote is similar to WalterB's idea from before, it's just two actors, and it's only 1 page long. It should be very easy to do, but if I cannot get someone to record sound perhaps I can do it with narration or something, and keep the dialogue quiet, and the narrator is just telling what they are saying or something.

The reason why I haven't showed much is because the stuff I have worked on for other people, they did not give me permission to show it on here. I only got permission to show the one short film, the slasher one, a few months ago. If I write the short film to have narration, explaining what the two actors are saying to each other, do you think that it will make sense to the audience as to why it's narrated. I could do the sad girl one as well, I just didn't know where to take it before. But I will try the one I wrote first with narration over silent dialogue and see if I can make that work as well.
 
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