Homework help

I was helping my nephew with his homework last night and we were googling to find some information and this kind of thing kept popping up http://essayseek.com/ and it got us talking. I knew that people often got other people to do their assignments for them, that used to happen when I was in college, but I had no idea you could get it done professionally and there are hundreds of testimonials on there.
It got me thinking what kind of situation you need to be in to have to use something like that, anyone used one? The plagiarism thing is very hazy too, when you google it there's no clear answer, not one that can cope with the age of the internet.
Interesting stuff.
 
If it is a scratch written essay is not technically plagiarized. When the customer passes it off as their own original work, plagiarism occurs. The odds of being found out are fairly low unless the writer sells you an essay that was already submitted by someone else.
 
That's what I was wondering, while it is passing off something of your own that was written by someone else, it wouldn't show up on any plagiarism software if it was written to order, like these seem to be.
Playing devil's advocate here, but I kind of feel that if you've been to all the classes and done the work but just lack the ability to present it in essay form, is it really so bad to get someone else to write it for you? I used to type my friend's assignments up all the time as he was terrible at typing and just used two fingers :)
 
Having been to the classes doesn't mean that you understand the subject. If you can't express the subject in essay form, that's an indication that you're failing right there. This is cheating, pure and simple.
 
Most college professors have ways of determining if a work is from an "Essay Mill". I had a fellow student get bounced because he submitted a paper that he had bought.

When I was giving classes in the military I had a pretty good idea who was using "probability enhancement" to try to pass the class.
 

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one dude graduated college and he was illiterate. later he learned how to write and then he made a book about it. just cheated and copied his whole way through. you can't make this stuff up.
 
Most college professors have ways of determining if a work is from an "Essay Mill". I had a fellow student get bounced because he submitted a paper that he had bought.

When I was giving classes in the military I had a pretty good idea who was using "probability enhancement" to try to pass the class.

This is very true. To my understanding, many college professors even have a program they can run your essay through now to see if it pops up on the web pre-written. It's a very dangerous idea to play with, and one should never do so; it's not worth getting kicked out of school for.

Even in high school, most teachers can tell when a paper isn't from a student purely based off their academic performance. It doesn't take a genius to figure out that when a kid is aceing essays and bombing everything else, something else is at work.

Some of these aids online can be helpful, though, as long as they aren't writing the content for you. I had to read a monotonous civil war novel for my college US History class last semester, and I read about three chapters before just reading the Spark Notes (Online cliff-notes site if you're not familiar) and getting an 'A' on the test. In all honesty, I probably knew more about the book from those than half the students who either read it and didn't absorb much, or didn't read it at all. In times like that, these aids can be really beneficial. Whenever I read Shakespeare, whether it's for a class or not, (I love Shakespeare) I always use Sparknote's No Fear Shakespeare section which essentially summarizes and translates the text.

The reason I mention my practice of Sparknotes is because it seems to be the better part of the gray area of the using the internet to get quick and easy answers. However, I think Sparknotes is far different than turning in an essay you didn't write.

But, I don't see the harm in reading essays of topics you also need to write on, as long as you aren't pulling directly from them or stealing their ideas and words. I'm not a good analytical writer, so I struggle with college history essays, so awhile back I read a couple essays a buddy of mine had written for the same class. I didn't steal his ideas in any way, but reading an essay that was better than mine allowed me to figure out how to restructure my paper.
 
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