Hi, Need Feedback on my Beginner Gear Selection

Todzilla

Member
I have a fairly hard budget of $2,000 to start doing videos.

I am a musician with a very nice audio studio for music production. I want to start learning how to make my own videos to promote my music. Nothing too elaborate, just a starter approach. I want to do close-ups, some time effects like slo-mo and fast motion. Mostly outdoor shooting or indoor with lighting. I want to do some cool camera movement and get as good results as I can get with decent entry level gear and learning. If video is anything like audio, the gear is 10% of the end product and the techniques used are 90%, so I'm more interested in learning technique than collecting the coolest gear available.

Proposed stuff via B and H photo:

Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T7i DSLR Camera with 18-55mm and 55-250mm Lenses Kit
Lighting: Dracast LED500 S-Series Daylight 3-Light Kit with V-Mount Battery Plates and Soft Case
Tripod: Magnus VT-4000 Tripod System with Fluid Head
Stabilizer: YELANGU Handheld DSLR Camera Stabilizer
Software: Girlfriend's 4 year old version of Final Cut Pro (free, as long as I'm not a jerk)
Accessories: Batteries, SD Cards

I already have a MacBook Pro with i7 quad core processor, 16G RAM and a 1TB HD.

This gives me a little wiggle room, budget wise. Am I missing anything important? Are these components relatively comparable in their semi-pro to entry level range?

I may try greenscreen later on, but thought I need to learn more about lighting first. I may get a Rode shotgun mic, but most of my audio will be pre-recorded and lip synced.

Thanks in Advance for your input.
 

BBfilms

Member
I have a scarlett pro studio plus many older portable studios like the Boss CD but honestly they are good for foley but you cant really use them on set, pre recording great for voice over etc... but syncing is just making your life harder.

try getting a zoom H1 or a Tascam DR-05 for sound and some lavs (purple panda is affordable and quite recommended)
 
I have a scarlett pro studio plus many older portable studios like the Boss CD but honestly they are good for foley but you cant really use them on set, pre recording great for voice over etc... but syncing is just making your life harder.

try getting a zoom H1 or a Tascam DR-05 for sound and some lavs (purple panda is affordable and quite recommended)
He wasn’t talking about recording sync sound:

I may get a Rode shotgun mic, but most of my audio will be pre-recorded and lip synced.
Music videos typically record to pre-recorded music playback. The scratch track recorded on the camera will be more than ample for syncing to the pre-recorded track in post.
 
I have a fairly hard budget of $2,000 to start doing videos.

Nothing too elaborate, just a starter approach. I want to do close-ups, some time effects like slo-mo and fast motion. Mostly outdoor shooting or indoor with lighting. I want to do some cool camera movement and get as good results as I can get with decent entry level gear and learning. If video is anything like audio, the gear is 10% of the end product and the techniques used are 90%, so I'm more interested in learning technique than collecting the coolest gear available.
This may seem counterintuitive, but... don’t. Don’t spend your $2k on all this stuff right now.

You can get a real starter approach that yields good results, on your phone. Seriously. Get the Filmic Pro app so you can manually control exposure and focus, shoot in different frame rates, and even shoot for slow-mo and high-speed effects. Then, if you’re gonna purchase anything, get a decent gimbal for your phone. The Zhiyun-Tech Smooth-4 is actually pretty good.

The stabilizer you were looking it is pretty much a knock-off of Steadicam and Glidecam handheld stabilizers. Thing is, those take HOURS of practice to get them right. Not for beginners. A 3-axis gimbal can have you up and running in a couple of hours. And even if you really get going on these music videos and get to a point where you do feel the justification for buying a nice camera and support kit, your phone and its gimbal will still potentially have some shelf life for speciaty shots.

The app plust the gimbal and you’re still under $150 for something that can help you learn. Seriously. And you could look at investing in a better light kit (and maybe a tutorial course on lighting), since that is really the make-or-break aspect of shooting indoors. Especially for music videos. You can actually do a lot with one really good light and can even get better results than with three cheap LED panels. Intellytech F-165 or Aputure C300D or C120D - any one of those with a softbox. That, a good stand, and a couple of large 5-in-1 reflectors can go a very long way.

And if your phone is an iPhone, get the SanDisk iXpand so you can easily transfer your raw video clips to your computer for editing in FCPX.
 

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