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misc Four completed scripts. Is it time to look for representation?

Chasing a Manager is just like chasing a shadow. Good luck, you're going to need it.

But if you check the websites of various Boutique Agencies and Management Firms regularly, once in a while you'll see one opens up to accepting queries. They don't stay open long because they get so many, so you have to be diligent and jump on it when it happens.
I don't actually know anyone who acquired a Manager until after they made that first sale. Usually they were referred to the Manager by the Agent who negotiated the deal. Agents are heartless. They won't refer you unless they see money in thier future, so they won't always do it.

As far as finding those Management websites, pop up Google Maps, hover over the Los Angels area, search Entertainment Managers, and stand back. Or check IMDP Pro. You can also back-track starting with an Actor or Producer or whatever and figure out who represents them.

A lot of this is about accolades. Anybody who sees potential in you will bend over backwards to help you advance your career. We all want to be part of the Next Big Thing, and nobody knows where it's coming from. The Elevator Pitch is a real thing. It's on you to be in the elevator when Spielberg steps in.
Good luck!
 
In the United States? Nope. You almost always have to get a REFERRAL to an agent. It's the same with Managers but you can also query Managers while most agents are never going to reply to a query. One man shops might if your query STINGS and IMPRESSES them with your logline but it's gotta be good... Think HIGH CONCEPT. Top agencies and many top management firms won't even open a query email. They will only meet you through a referral.

Middle tier management firms and one-man agencies will often read your query but even then? If you expect to get a foot in the door? Your pitching logline has got to be something they'll think they can sell. Again... Think High Concept. Some managers might be more willing to work with a screenwriter who can really write but doesn't have anything high concept... YET.

Other than that? You can perform some research on Producers who've produced similar films to what you've written but don't go to them with something too similar because they've already made that film. I'd never recommend blindly sending email queries to producers all over LA with some service. They get hit hard with these services all the time and while they might actually open an email if the subject line is tasty enough? Most of the time, their assistants will just hit delete.

Having said that... There are still Producers out there willing to accept an email query. There's no real list however. You've got to do some research and find their contact information and trust me... Some of them are NOT going to like getting an email query. While email queries used to be pretty standard back in the day? Today, more and more producers look at them as if you're possibly stalking them so you've got to make sure your email is clear. Obviously do NOT mention anything about NOT being a stalker... LOL. But let them know right off the bat that you're a screenwriter and you're querying them. Make that clear so they do NOT misinterpret your communication.

A lot of Producers will respond to a GOOD email query as long as you've got a great logline. IF they like your logline well enough? They will usually ask for the script or send you their release form to sign (digital signatures work) and send back to them along with your script. There's a handful of Producers out there who will EXPECT you to NOT send your script to anyone else WHILE they are evaluating your script. They'll let you know that in an email IF they like your logline well enough to ask for your script.

This is just my recommendation... IF you are lucky enough to get a Producer to request your script and they PASS on it as most obviously will? Don't be afraid to ASK FOR A REFERRAL to an agent or manager. You'll know RIGHT AWAY if they liked your writing or not... LOL. If they give you a referral? They liked your writing. If they do NOT respond or tell you they don't know anyone to refer you to? You can pretty much assume they didn't like your writing.

Another way to query is to cinematographers... I can't go into how to find them here but there's a ton of them who are in fact represented by agencies who have their resumes ONLINE. If you are willing to perform your due diligence and figure out how to search for those resumes via Google? You can get their contact information pretty easily. Many cinematographers aspire to become directors and many of them are passively looking for a great screenplay to break into directing with. If your scripts aren't high concept? This can be a good way to go because a lot of cinematographers want to try and break in with some kind of Indie fare. Cinematographers are not going to have you sign a release and if they like your writing well enough and your communication with them is NICE enough? Many are willing to refer you to their agency.

You're not gonna read this anywhere else... It ain't in any book either. It's just out of the box thinking.

*EDIT: I forgot to mention that when you query a Producer via email? Perform some research on them first. If you have to watch one or more of their movies? Do that. Why? So you can include some kind of information about them in your query that lets them know you admire them or their movies or hopefully... BOTH. LOL. Hollywood is RUN on EGOS. The more you STROKE those egos, the more willing they are to read your work but don't be an obvious brown-noser -- don't be a nuisance. It's got to feel ORGANIC to them.
You don't appear to know what a High Concept is.
Further, this stuff you post is just the same stuff on every Screenwriting Website. I used to write this kind of copy as a side gig a decade ago. It's for the fringe market and has little to do with the reality of the situation today. I live and work in the Hollywood Entertainment Box. So do all my friends and one of my kids. You're out of the box thinking is way, way, way out of the box.

REALITY: Wannabe Directors have ambition and no money. Don't waste your time trying to contact them. In the Hollywood Food Chain, Screenwriters-- even unsold ones-- are above the Below-the-Line-agents that rep Cinematographers. If those Agents have any pull, why are thier clients not Above-the-line Directors? I'll tell you why--I'm at the bottom of the Producer pile (still Above-the-Line), and I wouldn't give a Cinematographer's Orange County Agent the time of day. He's my natural enemy.
And you can't go into how to contact a Cinematographer? Because you don't know, maybe? I'll do it, no problem, because I do this for a living. Go to Mandy.com or call the Guild. Bingo! You got Cinematographers coming out your ears. Not that it will help, unless maybe you want to give the script away.
There might be a dozen top notch Cinematographers, but they're top notch because they're Cinematographers, not Directors in waiting.
It takes money to make a movie, and Producers raise money. It takes a Producer to get a project greenlit.

Also, ALL blind queries are turned away by legit Producers if they include a logline. The Assistant or someone lower will toss that unsolicited logline, because Producers hate getting sued. You can say, "I have a script that fits your needs" or "style" or "genre" or something, but no logline. These days people are litigation-happy, and a blind query is about asking permission to send in an actual submission query with a logline included. I didn't make the rules, it's just the way it is nowadays. We need a communications trail. That's from my Entertainment Lawyer's lips to your ears.

And mostly, if a producer says PASS, it means PASS. Drop it, or you will not get another shot. For god's sake don't ask him for anything or he'll never speak to you again. If he wants to develop you as a writer, he'll let you know, and then ask away. Buit know unless it's in his best interest, he's not going to give you notes, or even talk about your script. He has to make it perfectly clear that he has zero interest in your script to protect himself from lawsuits. And that stroke thier ego crap? Producers are not Actors or Writers. Stroking egos is the Producer's job-- nobody's does it better. Don't poke the bear.

If you want get read via the net, you need to meet someone or submit to script calls. A good logline gets you a request from a script call. I have heard good things about this place
https://virtualpitchfest.com/
They list wants of various Producers and Agencies, etc.
 
You don't appear to know what a High Concept is.
Further, this stuff you post is just the same stuff on every Screenwriting Website. I used to write this kind of copy as a side gig a decade ago. It's for the fringe market and has little to do with the reality of the situation today. I live and work in the Hollywood Entertainment Box. So do all my friends and one of my kids. You're out of the box thinking is way, way, way out of the box.

REALITY: Wannabe Directors have ambition and no money. Don't waste your time trying to contact them. In the Hollywood Food Chain, Screenwriters-- even unsold ones-- are above the Below-the-Line-agents that rep Cinematographers. If those Agents have any pull, why are thier clients not Above-the-line Directors? I'll tell you why--I'm at the bottom of the Producer pile (still Above-the-Line), and I wouldn't give a Cinematographer's Orange County Agent the time of day. He's my natural enemy.
And you can't go into how to contact a Cinematographer? Because you don't know, maybe? I'll do it, no problem, because I do this for a living. Go to Mandy.com or call the Guild. Bingo! You got Cinematographers coming out your ears. Not that it will help, unless maybe you want to give the script away.
There might be a dozen top notch Cinematographers, but they're top notch because they're Cinematographers, not Directors in waiting.
It takes money to make a movie, and Producers raise money. It takes a Producer to get a project greenlit.

Also, ALL blind queries are turned away by legit Producers if they include a logline. The Assistant or someone lower will toss that unsolicited logline, because Producers hate getting sued. You can say, "I have a script that fits your needs" or "style" or "genre" or something, but no logline. These days people are litigation-happy, and a blind query is about asking permission to send in an actual submission query with a logline included. I didn't make the rules, it's just the way it is nowadays. We need a communications trail. That's from my Entertainment Lawyer's lips to your ears.

And mostly, if a producer says PASS, it means PASS. Drop it, or you will not get another shot. For god's sake don't ask him for anything or he'll never speak to you again. If he wants to develop you as a writer, he'll let you know, and then ask away. Buit know unless it's in his best interest, he's not going to give you notes, or even talk about your script. He has to make it perfectly clear that he has zero interest in your script to protect himself from lawsuits. And that stroke thier ego crap? Producers are not Actors or Writers. Stroking egos is the Producer's job-- nobody's does it better. Don't poke the bear.

If you want get read via the net, you need to meet someone or submit to script calls. A good logline gets you a request from a script call. I have heard good things about this place
https://virtualpitchfest.com/
They list wants of various Producers and Agencies, etc.
@geckopelli -- What's your deal? Why do I threaten you so much? LOL. You sure as HELL do not threaten me. I stand by everything I've posted here on the site. Much of what you write is gobbledygook... Especially when it comes to writing specs. I know what HIGH CONCEPT is. LOL. And the stuff I write is NOT on every screenwriting website. What the hell are you even talking about?

Everything you post on here is BLACK or WHITE. Your way or the highway. That's simply not true. There are a myriad of ways to go about getting a start in the industry. I'm doing the same thing you're doing... Trying to help. I happen to know quite a few managers more than willing to read email queries on a daily basis in HOPES of finding the next big thing. Agents? No. But I never said agents. Do you even read my posts or are you simply too angry to read what I post because my posts simply do not agree with yours? LOL.

Dude... GET A GRIP.

Seriously... I've not said ANYTHING on this website that I do NOT stand by 100%. I seem to recall in the beginning of reading your posts? You didn't seem to even know the difference between a spec and a shooting script.

And? Nothing you've said is earth shattering... LOL. It's simply YOUR OPINION.

I could sit here and name you name after name after name of cinematographers who have gone on to become directors and whether you want to believe it or not? There's a lot of them out there who do want to become directors but that's not what I was attempting to get across to anyone reading the post. I was simply explaining how you can get a referral to an agent. I've done it and I've seen it done time and time again. Jesus. It's no different than getting a repped actor friend to give you a referral to an agent.

Nobody said to hunker down and find a hundred cinematographers out there to query... LOL. Jesus. Get a fucking grip, Dude.

And NO... I wouldn't go to Mandy to do this. I also wouldn't call the guild. I prefer to perform Google searches because with the correct Google search? You can find cinematographers whose PDF resumes are online and those resumes say who they're repped by. If it were me personally? I'd want to narrow that search down to some specific agencies and then perform searches in Google for those resumes who are repped by specific agencies and YES... There is a way to do that. Why in the HELL would I go to Mandy and browse through a shit ton of cinematographers? Waste of time.

The numbers tell the truth... It's not written down anywhere of course but if you know how to write a fucking good email query and perform your due diligence on each and every producer you query? Assuming your pitch is really good and hopefully, high concept? You'll get one to three bites to read the script. Like it or not? Those are the numbers. You don't have to agree. It is what it is. Nobody... Especially ME ever said it was EASY. It's HARD but if you want to get your foot in the door and you have no representation? There are ways to get meetings. It's DONE every DAY whether you see it or not -- whether YOU like it or not -- whether you agree with it or not.

At the same time while we're on this bullshit pissing contest? You can do the same thing with actors. Find an actor in a movie you like. Perform some research. Find out who they're repped by. If they're repped by an agency you wouldn't mind getting a meeting with? Reach out to the actor about your script. Don't send it to them of course but pitch it to them. Let them know you saw them in whatever movie that compelled you to reach out and tell them you think they are perfect for such and such part in the script. If they read it and like it? They too may very well be able to refer you to their agency. I've seen it done HUNDREDS of times so don't tell me THAT'S NOT THE WAY IT'S DONE. LOLOLOLOLOLOL. I'm certainly not telling anyone to go throw their script over some well-known actor's wall and into their back yard.

Legit producers turn away blind queries? Sure, a lot of them do. I never said they didn't but it only takes ONE yes to get your script read. LOLOLOLOLOL. I am pretty sure everyone on this site understands this is a NUMBERS game. I'm not advocating any ONE way to get your script read. There are in fact numerous ways to get that accomplished. And to be honest? I've checked out your website. No offense but producers like YOU are in fact the EASIEST producers to approach because they are in fact looking for material to kick them up to the next rung on the ladder.

You're sitting there telling us when a Producer PASSES, it means PASS! Drop it!

No shit? Is this not fucking OBVIOUS? Why would ANYONE turn around and fucking pester a producer who's just passed on your script and or query?

MOVE ON.

Now go transcribe another spec into a shooting script.
 
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That's how it's done-- send it out on request.
Sure there are better possibilities, but they ain't gonna happen. Screenwriters have zero chance if they don't put thier workout there. And the fact is that you can make all the friends in the Industry you want, but you'll find they're not so quick to lay their reputation and maybe their job on the line for your script, because that's what they're doing if they go to bat for you.
As far as Producers not trusting Writers, that's on the Writers. They claim their scripts were stolen all the time because of similarities. I had a guy pitch a TV Show at me once. It was a show I watched when I was a kid, "It's About Time", but he thought it was an original idea, and I was trying to steal it. It was so close, he must have seen the show as a small child. He didn't believe me until I sung the show's theme song at him. So don't be so quick to think your "original" script is original, muchless worth stealing. Producers need Screenwriters more than they need scripts.
In any case, fish or cut bait. If you're not willing to send your script out on the Producer's Terms, you're wasting your time writing it.

Attached is the standard Release Form we use at Secret Life Productions.
I read your release form and it sounds quote sensible. So I'm curious, would it then make more practical sense — instead of submitting finished screenplays to whomever — to develop general creative and business relationships with independent producers so that both parties can feel comforatable working together on new projects, developing them together? That's how I often work as a marketing content writer, where editors and writers will shoot pitches, ideas, general requirements etc. back and forth until something sticks.
 
I read your release form and it sounds quote sensible. So I'm curious, would it then make more practical sense — instead of submitting finished screenplays to whomever — to develop general creative and business relationships with independent producers so that both parties can feel comforatable working together on new projects, developing them together? That's how I often work as a marketing content writer, where editors and writers will shoot pitches, ideas, general requirements etc. back and forth until something sticks.
That's exactly how it works and what I did. That's why I work even though I've never earned screen credit. I'm know screenwriting inside-out, but my imagination has never lined up with the times closely enough to have original material produced, until now.

To a Producer unsolicited screenplays are like listing skills on your resume. Can you handle characters? Continuity? Can you format? It's all there in your scripts.
 
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