Crew of 2

The Sennheiser G3 lavs are $700 per set - you'll need at least two (2) - and it is common practice among professionals to replace the lavs with a Sanken or CountryMan which would add another $300 each to your budget. (2 wireless @ $700 + 2 lavs @ $300 = $2,000) A quality recorder, shotgun and hypercardioid with the usual accessories like a shock-mount, boom-pole and wind protection are much better investments; I would get that before delving into wireless lavs. Using lavs can be a tricky proposition; I usually spend a lot of time trying to eliminate clothing rustle and other problems, like the actors going off-axis from the lav (turning their head away). Investing the time and effort to acquire the proper boom technique can go a long way to getting you solid production sound. When I edit dialog I much prefer boomed dialog; it sounds much more natural.

It is common practice to use the dialog from close-ups, two-shots and the like for the wide shots. As long as you have some audible dialog from the wide shots it's not that difficult to sync, especially if your dialog editor has Vocalign; dialog wilds are a good alternative as well.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/551607-REG/Audio_Technica_AT_875_Shotgun_Microphone.html - $600/kit

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...4053b_Hypercardioid_Condenser_Microphone.html - $600

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...MD661_PMD661_Professional_Portable_Flash.html - $600
 
Last edited:
Cracker Funk, I was responding to your "With that budget, though, you don't necessarily have to limit yourself to one lens..."

Audio Alcove I was reading this and your blog and it's great advice - thank you. A few years ago I bought the Azden Shotgun Microphone Bundle for around $500: Included Azden SGM-1000 Microphone (they call it a "super-cardioid"...) G11510 Shockmount, G556 Pole, Kata Bag, 25ft XLRM-F Cable. Do you think I could get away with limiting my expenses to a better hypercardioid? I also have the zoom H4N.

"Investing the time and effort to acquire the proper boom technique can go a long way to getting you solid production sound." GREAT! because I have time and I find film audio pretty fascinating, but I don't have a lot of money :)
Thanks!!
 
Last edited:
Shotguns can be used indoors, but it is the high degree of skill needed to avoid the overly "roomy" sound so prevalent in indie films that defeats the casual boom-op, which is why I recommend hypercardioids. Even experienced boom-ops prefer hypercardioids for "real" locations as opposed to sound stages.

Decent hypercardioids are relatively expensive - the $400 to $700 range - but are a solid investment as they can be used during audio post for recording Foley and sound FX. The Schoeps Colette at about $2,000 is very popular with the professional production sound crowd. I only mention that to show that something like the $700 Audio Technica AT4053b isn't really that expensive by comparison.

If the Azden is what you have stay with it, but plan on replacing it as soon as you can. The Rode NTG-3 is known as the poor mans MKH-416, and, although not quite that good, is an excellent shotgun. (BTW, shotguns can be super- or hyper-; it is the interference tube that give them their off-axis rejection.)

One thing to keep in mind is that a nice mic can last for decades; most of my mics are ten or more years old, some are over 20. Mics from the post WWII era through the '60's are still in high demand and the bidding can can stratospheric; I've seen them go for well over $10,000.
 
Last edited:
You CAN (and probably ought to) go back and edit that. ;)
I kinda like the vulgar version better. :cool:

Indiefilming, I forgot I wrote that, but I guess I did. Mr. Short-Term-Memory over here. Anyway, yeah I agree, don't spend too much money on equipment. IF I had included equipment in my overall budget, then roughly 25% of my budget went to equipment, so I guess that at least says something about where my priorities lie. People first.
 
If the Azden is what you have stay with it, but plan on replacing it as soon as you can. The Rode NTG-3 is known as the poor mans MKH-416, and, although not quite that good, is an excellent shotgun. (BTW, shotguns can be super- or hyper-; it is the interference tube that give them their off-axis rejection.)

One thing to keep in mind is that a nice mic can last for decades; most of my mics are ten or more years old, some are over 20. Mics from the post WWII era through the '60's are still in high demand and the bidding can can stratospheric; I've seen them go for well over $10,000.
Is it possible to use the zoom H4N as my shotgun mounted on the camera and the Azden on the boom?

And is it important to have either a super or hyper shotgun? or both? I really need to be in a class.... Thanks Alcove.

I love hearing that a good mic holds up over the years! That's wonderful news! I'm going to save to buy something worthwhile like the Schoeps Colette. When budget permits, we always hire pros, but these little shoots reinforce the need to learn audio. ... bad audio is colossally depressing.
 
Top