Audio Gear - Shotgun mic's setup

Hi, new to the forum so i'm sorry if this is in the wrong place.

I'm looking for a setup to get into recording live sounds for films, games etc..

I understand that i'll need a shotgun mic setup. (Completely external from the camera) , boom poled shotgun mic is what I need really. Also something for that to record into... that parts always eluded me, and how do I hear my signal? Would that be a part of the same interface?

I was wondering if anyone could recommend me products that would be ideal? Price range is preferably under £1000 for the moment.

Thank you!
 
Thanks for the reply, I mean like, say an outdoor scene in film - or a scene for games where the audio is captured while the voice actors act 'similar to the last of us' .

(That's not worded very well, but i'm all set for post thanks) it's capturing the sounds in out door conditions etc..

EDIT: In the last of us, the actors physically acted the scene and all the voices were tracked via overhead mics, it's not too common in games I know, but it's something I'd like to be ready for
 
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I understand that i'll need a shotgun mic setup. (Completely external from the camera) , boom poled shotgun mic is what I need really. Also something for that to record into... that parts always eluded me...
Welcome, Ryan!

First, which camera are you using? If it's a higher-end camera with XLR inputs and decent sound recording, we may be able to utilize more of your budget for other or better mics and support gear instead of having to buy a recorder. If, however, you are using a DSLR or a consumer camcorder that offers only 1/8" input, you will need a recorder.

£1000 is about $1600USD, which can be a pretty good starting budget for a very basic kit. Assuming that your camera does NOT have good sound capabilities, I'd look first at a complete shotgun kit built around the RØDE NTG-2. You can use the shotgun on a boom for dialog, but you can also use it for VO work if you end up recording your game dialog in a more traditional way.

Next will be the recorder. Don't cheap out on a recorder, as handheld recorders don't generally have as much clean gain without a mixer on the front end. The Fostex FR2-LE is a good place to start, as is the TASCAM HD-P2. Don't forget memory cards.

With a mic and mic support, and a decent recorder, there's one more thing:

... and how do I hear my signal? Would that be a part of the same interface?
Headphones. Your camera or your sound recorder will have a headphone output, so you'll need a good pair of headphones. Look at the Sony MDR-7506.

Also, you might want to look at some sort of production bag for the recorder.

Side note: cheeseandachallenge, Foley is a proper name and should always be capitalized.
 
Hi,

I don't actually have a camera, I want to work solely as a audio engineer, boom operator really.
I'm only ever in the studio, but I like the idea of recording sound for film/tv/games instead of just mixing.

Thanks for the great response by the way!

That mic seems like a good one, good kit for a decent enough price! at least to get me started!

That's a cool little recorder too! Seems to be the whole package! My only other query now is, how is that recorder powered? it shows a dc input, but if i'm 'out and about' how am I going to power it?

Thanks again man, great response!
 
Here's the $1,200 buying guide. Select one from each category:


Shotgun mic kits will have the shotgun mic, boom-pole, shock-mount and simple wind protection (softie).

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/551607-REG/Audio_Technica_AT_875_Shotgun_Microphone.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...chnica_AT897BK_AT_897_Shotgun_Microphone.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/461493-REG/Rode_NTG_1_Shotgun_Condenser.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/747422-REG/Rode_NTG_2_Shotgun_Microphone_HDSLR.html


Be aware that the NTG-2 and the AT897 both have low output levels.


Hypercardioid mic:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/867157-REG/Avantone_Pro_CK1_CK_1_Small_Capsule_FET_Pencil.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/359043-REG/sE_Electronics_SE1A_SE1A_Small_Diaphragm.html



Audio recorders:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/832911-REG/Tascam_DR100MKII_DR_100mkII_Portable_Linear.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/821259-REG/Tascam_DR_40_DR_40_4_Track_Handheld_Digital.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/821260-REG/Roland_R_26_R_26_6_Channel_Digital_Field.html



More expensive audio recorders:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/432017-REG/Fostex_FR2_LE_FR_2_LE_2_Channel.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/404262-REG/Tascam_HD_P2_HD_P2_Portable_Stereo_CF.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...661mkii_Marantz_PMD661_MKII_Professional.html



Headphones:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/49510-REG/Sony_MDR_7506_MDR_7506_Headphone.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/507447-REG/Sennheiser_HD_25_1_II_HD_25_1_II.html



You'll also need cables, cases, battery packs and other miscellaneous items - about $200+.



Yes, some have recorded dialog for games and even done ADR "performing live," using a boom-op to capture the audio. This requires a great deal of skill - even more than doing production sound. However, audio post folks who specialize in games much prefer the traditional "VO" approach (stationary mic & talent) as the audio is usually much cleaner & much fuller and therefor much easier to edit, manipulate and mix.


If you are thinking of getting into audio post for media (film/TV/games, etc.) spend your money on better speakers and more appropriate software
 
I don't actually have a camera, I want to work solely as a audio engineer, boom operator really. I'm only ever in the studio, but I like the idea of recording sound for film/tv/games instead of just mixing.
If you're wanting to start a career as a mixer/recordist/boom op, you're going to need a much more thorough kit, and a whole lot of practice. You need to be able to record second-system (recorder separate from the camera) as well as direct-to-camera for professional productions with high-end cameras. And depending on how professional you want to get in TV/film, time code may be a necessity. Now we're in the range of Sound devices 633 and 664 mixer/recorders. $$$

The gear I suggested in my first post will be fine if all you're working is DSLR-based on indie films, and even then can always be expanded to include other necessary tools like wireless mics, plant mics, a hypercardioid, etc.

I'll PM you some decent resources to look at that will help you get started.

That's a cool little recorder too! Seems to be the whole package! My only other query now is, how is that recorder powered? it shows a dc input, but if i'm 'out and about' how am I going to power it?
AA Batteries.
 
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