story Sending the main idea of screenplay before writing it

Hello to all friends

I have good story ideas (at least for those around me that I describe, they are very enthusiastic)

I wanted to know before the script is finished, the main idea can be sent to the agencies and even say that I have only the main idea and if you agree with The main idea then to start completing the script?

I know that in the beginning, a very brief summary of the script will be sent, and if the agencies accept, more details will be sent, and finally the whole script will be sent.

Thanks
 
Hello to all friends

I have good story ideas (at least for those around me that I describe, they are very enthusiastic)

I wanted to know before the script is finished, the main idea can be sent to the agencies and even say that I have only the main idea and if you agree with The main idea then to start completing the script?

I know that in the beginning, a very brief summary of the script will be sent, and if the agencies accept, more details will be sent, and finally the whole script will be sent.

Thanks
Generally no, because there 2 moments
1. As mentioned, you will lose the script and the idea almost for sure, in addition, real producers will not like hearing it from you, because they might be later accused by your of stealing your ideas
2. Even the greatest idea without details is nothing (as mentioned above). When you will however put your idea in a script or outline form, that's when you will find that the details sometimes matter most and are most difficult to write about. Meaning that your raw idea without details may sound nice, but once you write it, it might be banal, boring or just unuseable.
 
Hello to all friends

I have good story ideas (at least for those around me that I describe, they are very enthusiastic)

I wanted to know before the script is finished, the main idea can be sent to the agencies and even say that I have only the main idea and if you agree with The main idea then to start completing the script?

I know that in the beginning, a very brief summary of the script will be sent, and if the agencies accept, more details will be sent, and finally the whole script will be sent.

Thanks
Once upon a time, I had a finished script. I raised money and shot the pilot (one-hour film). I shopped it around the US and EU. Even with all that, the "idea" was stolen by two networks - and ruined, I might add. Shooping an idea is a sure-fire way to get it stolen. At least with a finished property, you have some back-up from copyright protection (don't forget to send in the form and pay the fee).

The best way to go is the Robert Rodriguez route. Write it, produce it, shoot it, and finish the whole project. You have a much better chance of making some money that way. Work deals with art hourses to show your film and split ticket revenues. It's also much easier to shop a finished project, even if the buyer redoes the entire thing (a la Robert Rodriguez).

There are so many outlets now, and with crowd funding, who needs Hollywood? They're a den of thieves looking for new stuff to steal.
Good luck!
 
Thank you so much, guys.

Thank you for your good and practical advice

I wish to sell pure works for a better world for all
 
Great ideas are a dime a dozen - it's the execution that counts.
So no - write the screenplay first. Then re-write it a hundred more times.

Good luck!

Well,

Yes and No

"Yes", the vast majority of ideas, even great ones, do not constitute anything except the potential for a great script; there simply is not enough material to flesh out the idea into a fully materialized screenplay or TV Series. It is only after a considerable number of rewrites and some luck that the original idea manifests into something special.

"No", there are times that an idea is so profound, so inspiring that the script just flows out of the writer like an avalanche. It's like the story writes itself. A good example of this is "Rocky" which Stallone wrote in three and a half days. That to me is just staggering that an Academy Award winning script can be written that fast, but I think the idea just resonated with Stallone so much that it became almost effortless to turn into a screenplay.

Something similar happened to me this weekend when I created an outline for a first time director. He wanted a short screenplay from an "idea" he had for a ghost story. I don't know what it was about his idea but it resulted in the most amazing flow of effortless creativity I have ever experienced. In one sitting, I had an outline to what I believe will be one heck of a script.

Originally I promised him a short story but after he read the outline, he is pitching it around to producers and wants it turned into a full feature screenplay. I told him I would only write it if I retained 50% rights to the full script to which he agreed.
 
Well,

Yes and No

"Yes", the vast majority of ideas, even great ones, do not constitute anything except the potential for a great script; there simply is not enough material to flesh out the idea into a fully materialized screenplay or TV Series. It is only after a considerable number of rewrites and some luck that the original idea manifests into something special.

"No", there are times that an idea is so profound, so inspiring that the script just flows out of the writer like an avalanche. It's like the story writes itself. A good example of this is "Rocky" which Stallone wrote in three and a half days. That to me is just staggering that an Academy Award winning script can be written that fast, but I think the idea just resonated with Stallone so much that it became almost effortless to turn into a screenplay.

Something similar happened to me this weekend when I created an outline for a first time director. He wanted a short screenplay from an "idea" he had for a ghost story. I don't know what it was about his idea but it resulted in the most amazing flow of effortless creativity I have ever experienced. In one sitting, I had an outline to what I believe will be one heck of a script.

Originally I promised him a short story but after he read the outline, he is pitching it around to producers and wants it turned into a full feature screenplay. I told him I would only write it if I retained 50% rights to the full script to which he agreed.
Thank you so much, Constantin.

Thank you for the valuable experience and good information you provided

I wish you all the best
 
Last edited:
Top