news Ken Leung Says His ‘Lost’ Character Almost Had a ‘True Detective’-Style Spinoff with Josh Holloway

Over a decade after the 2010 “Lost” finale, and star Ken Leung is ready for a spinoff.

The “Industry” actor said that a spinoff concept was pitched for his character Miles and Josh Holloway’s fan favorite Sawyer following the supernatural events of the original series.

“I know there was an idea being kicked around where Miles and Sawyer would have a ‘True Detective-style’ spinoff, but that would be so much its own thing that it wouldn’t feel like continuing ‘Lost,'” Leung told The Independent when asked if he would return for a follow-up series. “But on the face of it, sure. There’s nothing about ‘Lost’ where it’s like, ‘I never wanna do that again.’ So yeah, maybe.”

Leung continued, “I would love to go back to Hawaii. When I think of ‘Lost,’ I don’t think of the show as much as I think of Hawaii. But I guess it depends on where they wanted to take it and who was coming back.”

Since “Lost” concluded in 2010, Leung has starred in “Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens,” “The Night Shift,” “The Blacklist,” “Old,” and upcoming “Searching 2.” Holloway, meanwhile, appeared in “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol,” “Colony,” and “Yellowstone.”

However, Leung told The Independent that he is still approached for stereotypically Asian roles. “Will the world ever see us as something that doesn’t have anything to do with martial arts?” Leung said. “Why is that still happening? Why am I — a non-martial artist — still periodically getting approached for things where it’s just assumed that I know it? So yeah, there’s a lot more internal work to do. I know that we do it out in public, but that’s not where the work needs to happen.”

As for representation in Hollywood, Leung added, “My kid gets to see Shang-Chi and, instead of Batman and Superman, he can pretend to be him, which is a dream come true. But I have mixed views. It’s gratifying to a degree, but I’m weary of it. What we’re talking about is undoing centuries of a mindset, and that takes doing. We live in an age where companies and my kid’s school now have a diversity program. Whether that is sincere or not is a whole other question.”

Fellow “Lost” alum Daniel Dae Kim recently opened up fighting for pay disparity for “Hawaii Five-O,” his first series post-“Lost,” and a lack of onscreen racial representation for AAPI actors.

“When my kids are watching shows, my wife and I always did this natural thing, which was whenever there was an Asian face on screen, to point it out to say, ‘Look,’” Kim told Esquire. “Just by doing that, it kind of created a dynamic where you would notice when you didn’t see it.”

Kim concluded, “When we see a show that has no minority representation, we’d say, ‘Wow that, that’s an awfully homogeneous cast.’ It’s important that we look at all of our entertainment through our lens. But it always says something about the way that I grew up.”
 
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