picture FPS and playback speed

NTICE

Member
So... this is probably going to make some of you laugh... but I wanted to get some clarification. I have footage that was filmed at 30 frames per second, and I'm slowing it down to try to find more detail. The issue is, although slowing it down does decrease the fps, shouldnt it still be 30fps per the timestamp of the video? For example, my dash cam has time and date embedded on the video... so shouldn't there still be 30 frames, per 1 second of THAT timestamp? Not the video project timestamp, but the actual time on the recorded video. Please let me know if I'm completely crazy here, thanks!
 

Sweetie

Member
I'm slowing it down to try to find more detail. The issue is, although slowing it down does decrease the fps.....Please let me know if I'm completely crazy here, thanks!
It's hard to tell if what you're asking doesn't make sense or the crazy option.
 
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NTICE

Member
It's hard to tell if what you're asking doesn't make sense or the crazy option.
Well that surely wasn't helpful. Read what I'm saying, carefully, once again. If you slow down a video that has a time signature on the actual video itself, shouldn't there still be 30 frames inside of that one second of time on the video... Even when slowed down? again, I'm not saying that there should be 30 frames on the video project when slowed down, but in the one second of the videos timestamp that's embedded on the screen.
 
Let's say that you don't slow it down but you actually do a freeze frame. That freeze frame has its own time stamp...it's own time code. If you play the freeze frame for 1 minute, the length of your playback is 1 minute, but the time stamp of your freeze frame stays the same.
 

NTICE

Member
Let's say that you don't slow it down but you actually do a freeze frame. That freeze frame has its own time stamp...it's own time code. If you play the freeze frame for 1 minute, the length of your playback is 1 minute, but the time stamp of your freeze frame stays the same.
Ok, my video actually has a timer on the screen... In the video... Not able to hide it. So I'm using that as my one second, to count frames. Since it's a timer/clock. Nothing to do with video playback timestamp or project timestamp. Just purely the actual clock on my video.
 

jax_rox

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Okay so assuming the time stamp is embedded, that the time stamp is extremely accurate and that the footage we're working with exactly 30fps (for argument's sake):
Each frame of your video will have 30 frames for every second. So theoretically there should be exactly 30 frames between 14:12:22 and 14:12:23. When you slow something down, you're actually increasing the frame rate, not decreasing. The computer creates new frames to facilitate the slow down. How it does that, exactly, is dependant on your software. So - if you were to take your 30 frames per second footage, take a screenshot of each frame and then arranged them all in a timeline, making each screenshot 1 minute long, it would take 30 minutes for your timestamp to increase from 14:12:22 to 14:12:23. That sequence would have 54,000 frames, it's just that every 1800 frames would be duplicates. You could slow your footage down so that one second equates to 30 minutes and you would still have 54,000 total frames. How similar each would be would depend on how your software interpolates that.
 

NTICE

Member
Okay so assuming the time stamp is embedded, that the time stamp is extremely accurate and that the footage we're working with exactly 30fps (for argument's sake):
Each frame of your video will have 30 frames for every second. So theoretically there should be exactly 30 frames between 14:12:22 and 14:12:23. When you slow something down, you're actually increasing the frame rate, not decreasing. The computer creates new frames to facilitate the slow down. How it does that, exactly, is dependant on your software. So - if you were to take your 30 frames per second footage, take a screenshot of each frame and then arranged them all in a timeline, making each screenshot 1 minute long, it would take 30 minutes for your timestamp to increase from 14:12:22 to 14:12:23. That sequence would have 54,000 frames, it's just that every 1800 frames would be duplicates. You could slow your footage down so that one second equates to 30 minutes and you would still have 54,000 total frames. How similar each would be would depend on how your software interpolates that.
Well said, thank you. The issue I'm having is that the manufacture says the fps is 30, but I'm not getting that on playback. So I'm attempting to prove that it's not 30fps... And having a difficult time doing so.
 
Why are you slowing it down? :huh: You say "to look for more detail" - but if you drop the footage into any standard editor, all the available frames will be laid out for you on the timeline, where you can inspect each one for whatever detail you're looking for.

If you want to know whether there are 30 frames per recorded second, you find the frame where the embedded timestamp changes, count from there to the next change, and either you have 30 or you don't. However, if you've imported 30fps footage into a project for which you've set the project parameters as 24fps (or not changed the software's default parameters), the software may strip out 6 frames per second to comply with your instructions.
 
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NTICE

Member
Why are you slowing it down? :huh: You say "to look for more detail" - but if you drop the footage into any standard editor, all the available frames will be laid out for you on the timeline, where you can inspect each one for whatever detail you're looking for.

If you want to know whether there are 30 frames per recorded second, you find the frame where the embedded timestamp changes, count from there to the next change, and either you have 30 or you don't. However, if you've imported 30fps footage into a project for which you've set the project parameters as 24fps (or not changed the software's default parameters), the software may strip out 6 frames per second to comply with your instructions.
Slowing it down to slow details of a car accident. I've set the project parameters to 4k 30fps. Also, that's exactly what I was doing to count frames... But was told that it was not possible to do it that way.
 
OK, so there are two different aspects to your enquiry - confirming the 30fps, and creating a slow-mo video.

As far as the first is concerned, count the frames as described and tell us how many you come up with (do it at three or four different time points in the clip to get a reliable average).

As for the second, you won't get a true slow motion because it wasn't recorded with that in mind. If you want to prove something about the accident on this basis, you're out of luck - if the point of interest happened in the millisecond between frames, no amount of digital extrapolation will make it appear. If it's purely for artistic purposes, though, there are a variety of plug-ins that'll draw new frames for you to create the impression of slow motion.
 

Sweetie

Member
>>Please let me know if I'm completely crazy here

After reading this thread, I wouldn't say completely crazy.

It sounds like you want to slow down footage to make footage that doesn't exist, suddenly exist.
 

NTICE

Member
>>Please let me know if I'm completely crazy here

After reading this thread, I wouldn't say completely crazy.

It sounds like you want to slow down footage to make footage that doesn't exist, suddenly exist.
Not even close to what I'm trying to do. But I like the passive aggressive comment, :clap:
 

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